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I've become interested in algorithms lately, and the fibonacci sequence grabbed my attention due to its simplicity.

I've managed to put something together in javascript that calculates the nth term in the fibonacci sequence in less than 15 milliseconds after reading lots of information on the web. It goes up to 1476...1477 is infinity and 1478 is NaN (according to javascript!)

I'm quite proud of the code itself, except it's an utter monster.

So here's my question: A) is there a faster way to calculate the sequence? B) is there a faster/smaller way to multiply two matrices?

Here's the code:

//Fibonacci sequence generator in JS
//Cobbled together by Salty
m = [[1,0],[0,1]];
odd = [[1,1],[1,0]];
function matrix(a,b) {
    /* 
    	Matrix multiplication
    	Strassen Algorithm
    	Only works with 2x2 matrices.
    */
    c=[[0,0],[0,0]];
    c[0][0]=(a[0][0]*b[0][0])+(a[0][1]*b[1][0]);
    c[0][1]=(a[0][0]*b[0][1])+(a[0][1]*b[1][1]);
    c[1][0]=(a[1][0]*b[0][0])+(a[1][1]*b[1][0]);
    c[1][1]=(a[1][0]*b[0][1])+(a[1][1]*b[1][1]);
    m1=(a[0][0]+a[1][1])*(b[0][0]+b[1][1]);
    m2=(a[1][0]+a[1][1])*b[0][0];
    m3=a[0][0]*(b[0][1]-b[1][1]);
    m4=a[1][1]*(b[1][0]-b[0][0]);
    m5=(a[0][0]+a[0][1])*b[1][1];
    m6=(a[1][0]-a[0][0])*(b[0][0]+b[0][1]);
    m7=(a[0][1]-a[1][1])*(b[1][0]+b[1][1]);
    c[0][0]=m1+m4-m5+m7;
    c[0][1]=m3+m5;
    c[1][0]=m2+m4;
    c[1][1]=m1-m2+m3+m6;
    return c;
}
function fib(n) {
    mat(n-1);
    return m[0][0];
}
function mat(n) {
    if(n > 1) {
        mat(n/2);
        m = matrix(m,m);
    }
    m = (n%2<1) ? m : matrix(m,odd);
}
alert(fib(1476)); //Alerts 1.3069892237633993e+308

The matrix function takes two arguments: a and b, and returns a*b where a and b are 2x2 arrays. Oh, and on a side note, a magical thing happened...I was converting the Strassen algorithm into JS array notation and it worked on my first try! Fantastic, right? :P

Thanks in advance if you manage to find an easier way to do this.

share|improve this question
    
your function stops working if called repeatedly - it will return NaN on the second call... –  Christoph Jan 9 '09 at 11:46
    
adding m = [[1,0],[0,1]]; as first line to fib() fixes this... –  Christoph Jan 9 '09 at 11:48
    
btw: have you noticed that you compute c twice - the code before m1 is already 2x2 matrix manipulation - which you overwrite in the following steps... –  Christoph Jan 9 '09 at 20:43
add comment

9 Answers 9

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Don't speculate, benchmark:

edit: I added my own matrix implementation using the optimized multiplication functions mentioned in my other answer. This resulted in a major speedup, but even the vanilla O(n^3) implementation of matrix multiplication with loops was faster than the Strassen algorithm.

<pre><script>

var fib = {};

(function() {
    var sqrt_5  = Math.sqrt(5),
        phi     = (1 + sqrt_5) / 2;

    fib.round = function(n) {
        return Math.floor(Math.pow(phi, n) / sqrt_5 + 0.5);
    };
})();

(function() {
    fib.loop = function(n) {
        var i = 0,
            j = 1;

        while(n--) {
            var tmp = i;
            i = j;
            j += tmp;
        }

        return i;
    };
})();

(function () {
    var cache = [0, 1];

    fib.loop_cached = function(n) {
        if(n >= cache.length) {
            for(var i = cache.length; i <= n; ++i)
                cache[i] = cache[i - 1] + cache[i - 2];
        }

        return cache[n];
    };
})();

(function() {
    //Fibonacci sequence generator in JS
    //Cobbled together by Salty
    var m;
    var odd = [[1,1],[1,0]];

    function matrix(a,b) {
        /*
            Matrix multiplication
            Strassen Algorithm
            Only works with 2x2 matrices.
        */
        var c=[[0,0],[0,0]];
        var m1=(a[0][0]+a[1][1])*(b[0][0]+b[1][1]);
        var m2=(a[1][0]+a[1][1])*b[0][0];
        var m3=a[0][0]*(b[0][1]-b[1][1]);
        var m4=a[1][1]*(b[1][0]-b[0][0]);
        var m5=(a[0][0]+a[0][1])*b[1][1];
        var m6=(a[1][0]-a[0][0])*(b[0][0]+b[0][1]);
        var m7=(a[0][1]-a[1][1])*(b[1][0]+b[1][1]);
        c[0][0]=m1+m4-m5+m7;
        c[0][1]=m3+m5;
        c[1][0]=m2+m4;
        c[1][1]=m1-m2+m3+m6;
        return c;
    }

    function mat(n) {
        if(n > 1) {
            mat(n/2);
            m = matrix(m,m);
        }
        m = (n%2<1) ? m : matrix(m,odd);
    }

    fib.matrix = function(n) {
        m = [[1,0],[0,1]];
        mat(n-1);
        return m[0][0];
    };
})();

(function() {
    var a;

    function square() {
        var a00 = a[0][0],
            a01 = a[0][1],
            a10 = a[1][0],
            a11 = a[1][1];

        var a10_x_a01 = a10 * a01,
            a00_p_a11 = a00 + a11;

        a[0][0] = a10_x_a01 + a00 * a00;
        a[0][1] = a00_p_a11 * a01;
        a[1][0] = a00_p_a11 * a10;
        a[1][1] = a10_x_a01 + a11 * a11;
    }

    function powPlusPlus() {
        var a01 = a[0][1],
            a11 = a[1][1];

        a[0][1] = a[0][0];
        a[1][1] = a[1][0];
        a[0][0] += a01;
        a[1][0] += a11;
    }

    function compute(n) {
        if(n > 1) {
            compute(n >> 1);
            square();
            if(n & 1)
                powPlusPlus();
        }
    }

    fib.matrix_optimised = function(n) {
        if(n == 0)
            return 0;

        a = [[1, 1], [1, 0]];
        compute(n - 1);

        return a[0][0];
    };
})();

(function() {
    var cache = {};
    cache[0] = [[1, 0], [0, 1]];
    cache[1] = [[1, 1], [1, 0]];

    function mult(a, b) {
        return [
            [a[0][0] * b[0][0] + a[0][1] * b[1][0],
                a[0][0] * b[0][1] + a[0][1] * b[1][1]],
            [a[1][0] * b[0][0] + a[1][1] * b[1][0],
                a[1][0] * b[0][1] + a[1][1] * b[1][1]]
        ];
    }

    function compute(n) {
        if(!cache[n]) {
            var n_2 = n >> 1;
            compute(n_2);
            cache[n] = mult(cache[n_2], cache[n_2]);
            if(n & 1)
                cache[n] = mult(cache[1], cache[n]);
        }
    }

    fib.matrix_cached = function(n) {
        if(n == 0)
            return 0;

        compute(--n);

        return cache[n][0][0];
    };
})();

function test(name, func, n, count) {
    var value;

    var start = Number(new Date);
    while(count--)
        value = func(n);
    var end = Number(new Date);

    return 'fib.' + name + '(' + n + ') = ' + value + ' [' +
        (end - start) + 'ms]';
}

for(var func in fib)
    document.writeln(test(func, fib[func], 1450, 10000));

</script></pre>

yields

fib.round(1450) = 4.8149675025003456e+302 [20ms]
fib.loop(1450) = 4.81496750250011e+302 [4035ms]
fib.loop_cached(1450) = 4.81496750250011e+302 [8ms]
fib.matrix(1450) = 4.814967502500118e+302 [2201ms]
fib.matrix_optimised(1450) = 4.814967502500113e+302 [585ms]
fib.matrix_cached(1450) = 4.814967502500113e+302 [12ms]

Your algorithm is nearly as bad as uncached looping. Caching is your best bet, closely followed by the rounding algorithm - which yields incorrect results for big n (as does your matrix algorithm).

For smaller n, your algorithm performs even worse than everything else:

fib.round(100) = 354224848179263100000 [20ms]
fib.loop(100) = 354224848179262000000 [248ms]
fib.loop_cached(100) = 354224848179262000000 [6ms]
fib.matrix(100) = 354224848179261900000 [1911ms]
fib.matrix_optimised(100) = 354224848179261900000 [380ms]
fib.matrix_cached(100) = 354224848179261900000 [12ms]
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the philosophy and the thoroughness –  annakata Jan 9 '09 at 13:07
    
Could you include the "naive" O(n^3) matrix multiplication too? I would guess it works better than Strassen for small n (upto 50? 100?) and after that it's slower. –  ShreevatsaR Jan 9 '09 at 14:02
    
@ShreevatsaR: posted a new answer addressing this - there seems to be a bug somewhere... –  Christoph Jan 9 '09 at 14:15
    
@ShreevatsaR: the Strassen algorithm sucks; the problems I had with my other (now deleted) implementation came from the recursion - using global variables fixed this... –  Christoph Jan 9 '09 at 17:05
    
I honestly have no idea how you got those times, considering I benchmarked my code in Firefox with the firebug console.time and ALWAYS got a time less than 15 milliseconds, no matter how large n is (besides, of course, if n is greater than 1476) –  Salty Jan 9 '09 at 18:08
show 2 more comments

There is a closed form (no loops) solution for the nth Fibonacci number.

See Wikipedia.

share|improve this answer
    
Where's your justification that it's O(1)? The closed form uses f^n, and powers of n can only be calculated with O(n) algorithms as far as I recall. –  paxdiablo Jan 9 '09 at 0:21
2  
Closed form means not an infinite series. It doesn't mean O(1) by any stretch of the imagination. –  paxdiablo Jan 9 '09 at 0:23
1  
Ok, it's O(1) for hardware that has exponentiation instructions. In any case, f^n can be calculated in O(log n) given O(1) multiplication, by caching power of 2 exponents instead of naively looping. –  recursive Jan 9 '09 at 0:25
    
I've removed references to O(1). –  recursive Jan 9 '09 at 0:26
    
And I've removed the downvote :-). –  paxdiablo Jan 9 '09 at 0:33
show 2 more comments

There may well be a faster way to calculate the values but I don't believe it's necessary.

Calculate them once and, in your program, output the results as the fibdata line below:

fibdata = [1,1,2,3,5,8,13, ... , 1.3069892237633993e+308];  // 1476 entries.
function fib(n) {
    if ((n < 0) || (n > 1476)) {
        ** Do something exception-like or return INF;
    }
    return fibdata[n];
}

Then, that's the code you ship to your clients. That's an O(1) solution for you.

People often overlook the 'caching' solution. I once had to write trigonometry routines for an embedded system and, rather than using infinite series to calculate them on the fly, I just had a few lookup tables, 360 entries in each for each of the degrees of input.

Needless to say, it screamed along, at the cost of only about 1K of RAM. The values were stored as 1-byte entries, [actual value (0-1) * 16] so we could just do a lookup, multiply and bit shift to get the desired value.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, I'm not shipping this to clients. I'm just trying to find the best (and for that matter, most interesting) way to generate the nth term. Storing them in an array isn't that interesting :P –  Salty Jan 9 '09 at 0:42
1  
Best in terms of what? If 'speed', then pre-calculation is the way to go. If 'readability', simply create an array where you set the first two terms and calculate all the others as f(n) = f(n-2) + f(n-1). If 'interest to you', then the question is subjective/argumentative and has no real answer. –  paxdiablo Jan 9 '09 at 0:59
    
Fine, speed when actually generating the sequence. I'm looking for much faster algorithms, not the fastest way to return the nth number (like arrays). –  Salty Jan 9 '09 at 11:43
    
The argument is very persuasive, but only where the seed numbers are known. In practice this rarely seems to be the case (not that I've personally used fib more than, ooh, about once in production) –  annakata Jan 9 '09 at 13:06
add comment

Here is a very fast solution of calculating the fibonacci sequence

function fib(n){
    var start = Number(new Date); 
    var field = new Array();
    field[0] = 0;
    field[1] = 1;
    for(var i=2; i<=n; i++)
        field[i] = field[i-2] + field[i-1]
    var end = Number(new Date); 
    return 'fib' + '(' + n + ') = ' + field[n] + ' [' +
        (end - start) + 'ms]';

}

var f = fib(1450)
console.log(f)
share|improve this answer
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How about memoizing the results that where already calculated, like such:

var IterMemoFib = function() {
    var cache = [1, 1];
    var fib = function(n) {
        if (n >= cache.length) {
            for (var i = cache.length; i <= n; i++) {
                cache[i] = cache[i - 2] + cache[i - 1];
            }
        }
        return cache[n];
    }

    return fib;
}();

Or if you want a more generic memoization function, extend the Function prototype:

Function.prototype.memoize = function() {
    var pad  = {};
    var self = this;
    var obj  = arguments.length > 0 ? arguments[i] : null;

    var memoizedFn = function() {
        // Copy the arguments object into an array: allows it to be used as
        // a cache key.
        var args = [];
        for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) {
            args[i] = arguments[i];
        }

        // Evaluate the memoized function if it hasn't been evaluated with
        // these arguments before.
        if (!(args in pad)) {
            pad[args] = self.apply(obj, arguments);
        }

        return pad[args];
    }

    memoizedFn.unmemoize = function() {
        return self;
    }

    return memoizedFn;
}

//Now, you can apply the memoized function to a normal fibonacci function like such:
Fib = fib.memoize();

One note to add is that due to technical (browser security) constraints, the arguments for memoized functions can only be arrays or scalar values. No objects.

Reference: http://talideon.com/weblog/2005/07/javascript-memoization.cfm

share|improve this answer
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To expand a bit on Dreas's answer:

1) cache should start as [0, 1]
2) what do you do with IterMemoFib(5.5)? (cache[5.5] == undefined)

fibonacci = (function () {
  var FIB = [0, 1];

  return function (x) {
    if ((typeof(x) !== 'number') || (x < 0)) return;
    x = Math.floor(x);

    if (x >= FIB.length)
      for (var i = FIB.length; i <= x; i += 1)
        FIB[i] = FIB[i-1] + FIB[i-2];

    return FIB[x];
  }
})();

alert(fibonacci(17));    // 1597 (FIB => [0, 1, ..., 1597]) (length = 17)
alert(fibonacci(400));   // 1.760236806450138e+83 (finds 18 to 400)
alert(fibonacci(1476));  // 1.3069892237633987e+308 (length = 1476)


If you don't like silent errors:

// replace...
if ((typeof(x) !== 'number') || (x < 0)) return;

// with...
if (typeof(x) !== 'number') throw new TypeError('Not a Number.');
if (x < 0) throw new RangeError('Not a possible fibonacci index. (' + x + ')');
share|improve this answer
    
Really nice. Still the same execution time as the code in my original post. I'm looking for something that really blows the first code out of the water. :P –  Salty Jan 9 '09 at 1:03
    
I'm getting 60ms in IE6 (10ms cached) and 1ms in FF3 for [0, 1] to fibonacci(1476). How fast do you need it to be? ;) –  Jonathan Lonowski Jan 9 '09 at 1:32
add comment

My previous answer got a bit crowded, so I'll post a new one:

You can speed up your algorithm by using vanilla 2x2 matrix multiplication - ie replace your matrix() function with this:

function matrix(a, b) {
    return [
        [a[0][0] * b[0][0] + a[0][1] * b[1][0],
            a[0][0] * b[0][1] + a[0][1] * b[1][1]],
        [a[1][0] * b[0][0] + a[1][1] * b[1][0],
            a[1][0] * b[0][1] + a[1][1] * b[1][1]]
    ];
}

If you care for accuracy and speed, use the caching solution. If accuracy isn't a concern, but memory consumption is, use the rounding solution. The matrix solution only makes sense if you want results for big n fast, don't care for accuracy and don't want to call the function repeatedly.

edit: You can even further speed up the computation if you use specialised multiplication functions, eliminate common subexpressions and replace the values in the existing array instead of creating a new array:

function square() {
    var a00 = a[0][0],
        a01 = a[0][1],
        a10 = a[1][0],
        a11 = a[1][1];

    var a10_x_a01 = a10 * a01,
        a00_p_a11 = a00 + a11;

    a[0][0] = a10_x_a01 + a00 * a00;
    a[0][1] = a00_p_a11 * a01;
    a[1][0] = a00_p_a11 * a10;
    a[1][1] = a10_x_a01 + a11 * a11;
}

function powPlusPlus() {
    var a01 = a[0][1],
        a11 = a[1][1];

    a[0][1] = a[0][0];
    a[1][1] = a[1][0];
    a[0][0] += a01;
    a[1][0] += a11;
}

Note: a is the name of the global matrix variable.

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Closed form solution in JavaScript:

function fib(n){
   var sqrt5 = Math.sqrt(5);
   var a = (1 + sqrt5)/2;
   var b = (1 - sqrt5)/2;
   var ans = Math.round((Math.pow(a, n) - Math.pow(b, n))/sqrt5);
   return ans;
}

Granted, even multiplication starts to take its expense when dealing with huge numbers, but this will give you the answer. As far as I know, because of JavaScript rounding the values, it's only accurate up to n = 75. Past that, you'll get a good estimate, but it won't be totally accurate unless you want to do something tricky like store the values as a string then parse those as BigIntegers.

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I've just written my own little implementation using an Object to store already computed results. I've written it in Node.JS, which needed 2ms (according to my timer) to calculate the fibonacci for 1476.

Here's the code stripped down to pure Javascript:

var nums = {}; // Object that stores already computed fibonacci results
function fib(n) { //Function
    var ret; //Variable that holds the return Value
    if (n < 3) return 1; //Fib of 1 and 2 equal 1 => filtered here
    else if (nums.hasOwnProperty(n)) ret = nums[n]; /*if the requested number is 
     already in the object nums, return it from the object, instead of computing */
    else ret = fib( n - 2 ) + fib( n - 1 ); /* if requested number has not
     yet been calculated, do so here */
    nums[n] = ret; // add calculated number to nums objecti
    return ret; //return the value
}

//and finally the function call:
fib(1476)

EDIT: I did not try running this in a Browser!

EDIT again: now I did. try the jsfiddle: jsfiddle fibonacci Time varies between 0 and 2ms

share|improve this answer
    
Btw: I compared the results of this function with a for loop: the for loop is way faster than this recursive function (at least if you try numbers < 30000, I couldn't try higher than 34150 with this function and NodeJS, because I get an max stack size error) –  Jonathan Jul 2 at 21:50
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