Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have several collections of classes/structs in my app.

The class is just a class with fields

class A
{
  public int somevalue;
  public string someothervalue
}

And my collection

List<A> _myList;

I need to be able to save _myList and load. I just want to save all class fields to file and load. I don't want to spend time writing my own save/load. Are there any tools in .NET to help me. I don't care about the file format.

share|improve this question
1  
How large is this collection? How many of these class(es) are you going to want to place in the collection? Your response to this comment will depend on which answer I post. –  Ramhound Nov 24 '10 at 12:43
    
quite a few, less than a hundred. This is just a test project where app is loading collection at startup and saves when exits. I just don't want to spend time on that. Because I am constatly adding new classes and collections. –  Captain Comic Nov 24 '10 at 12:45
1  
Do you want to save fields or properties? Some serializers(BinarySerializer) work on the fields, others (XmlSerializer) work on public properties. –  CodesInChaos Nov 24 '10 at 12:51
    
Good question. I am fine with public fields only. –  Captain Comic Nov 24 '10 at 12:52

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

XMLSerializer isn't hard to use. As long as your objects aren't huge, it's pretty quick. I serialize out some huge objects in a few of my apps. It takes forever and the resulting files are almost 100 megs, but they're editable should I need to tweak some stuff. Plus it doesn't matter if I add fields to my objects. The serialized files of the older version of the object still deserialize properly.. I do the serialization on a separate thread so it doesn't matter how long it takes in my case. The caveat is that your A class has to have a constructor for XMLSerialziation to work.

Here's some working code I use to serialize/deserialize with the error handling ripped out for readibility...

private List<A> Load()
{
    string file = "filepath";
    List<A> listofa = new List<A>();
    XmlSerializer formatter = new XmlSerializer(A.GetType());
    FileStream aFile = new FileStream(file, FileMode.Open);
    byte[] buffer = new byte[aFile.Length];
    aFile.Read(buffer, 0, (int)aFile.Length);
    MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(buffer);
    return (List<A>)formatter.Deserialize(stream);
}


private void Save(List<A> listofa)
{
    string path = "filepath";
    FileStream outFile = File.Create(path);
    XmlSerializer formatter = new XmlSerializer(A.GetType());
    formatter.Serialize(outFile, listofa);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
What's coilsfile in your demo? –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Dec 11 '13 at 22:00
    
Looks like that was a typo. Tried to remove anything specific to the code, and the original FileStream was probably called coilsfile. In my clean up effort, I neglected to rename coilsfile to aFile. But it's been three years now, so hard to tell. Good catch, though. Wow. Edited to reflect this. –  Tim Coker Dec 16 '13 at 20:10

There are many serializers:

Part of .net framework

  • XmlSerializer (standardized format, slow and verbose)
  • BinarySerializer (proprietary format, medium speed, supports cyclic graphs, serializes fields instead of properties => annoying versioning)

3rd party:

  • Json-Serializers (standardized format, text-based, shorter than xml)
  • ProtoBuf-Serializers (standardized format, binary, very fast)

I'd probably use a ProtoBuf Serializer if the file may be binary, and a json serializer if it needs to be plain-text.

share|improve this answer
    
The DataContractJsonSerializer is part of 3.5 and above (System.Runtime.Serialization.Json). Although for this specific instance, the BinaryFormatter would be a good choice. –  Tom Nov 24 '10 at 12:47
    
I don't the standard BinaryFormatter because its file format is opaque and its use of private fields breaks encapsulation and causes versioning problem. –  CodesInChaos Nov 24 '10 at 12:55

You can serialize your List<> using XML serializer or Binary Serializer and save the serialized list into a file.

Later , you can read this file content and retrieve your original list.

Make your type for which you are creating list [Serializable]

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. What about Dictionary<>? The same? Or my own IEnumerable/IEnumerator collection –  Captain Comic Nov 24 '10 at 13:03

I usually use the XML Serilizer, is fast, easy to implement and keep the objects in a hummand readable fashion, you can see a nice example.

You can use a binary serialization if you want a more size effective obfustated solution. (for example if you want to transmit the serialization over a network.)

EDIT: To get more control over the elements you serialize take a look of this example

share|improve this answer
    
Great example. But. The container is wrapped in Serializable class. How can serialize 'just the one variable of type List<>'. –  Captain Comic Nov 24 '10 at 12:56
    
Hi, you need to use XmlArray and XmlArrayItem control attributes, take a look to the new example. You must serialize the container of the list and the list have to be a public property. –  SubniC Nov 24 '10 at 15:49

I just wrote a blog post on saving an object's data to Binary, XML, or Json; well writing an object or list of objects to a file that is. Here are the functions to do it in the various formats. See my blog post for more details.

Binary

/// <summary>
/// Writes the given object instance to a binary file.
/// <para>Object type (and all child types) must be decorated with the [Serializable] attribute.</para>
/// <para>To prevent a variable from being serialized, decorate it with the [NonSerialized] attribute; cannot be applied to properties.</para>
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of object being written to the XML file.</typeparam>
/// <param name="filePath">The file path to write the object instance to.</param>
/// <param name="objectToWrite">The object instance to write to the XML file.</param>
/// <param name="append">If false the file will be overwritten if it already exists. If true the contents will be appended to the file.</param>
public static void WriteToBinaryFile<T>(string filePath, T objectToWrite, bool append = false)
{
    using (Stream stream = File.Open(filePath, append ? FileMode.Append : FileMode.Create))
    {
        var binaryFormatter = new System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter();
        binaryFormatter.Serialize(stream, objectToWrite);
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Reads an object instance from a binary file.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of object to read from the XML.</typeparam>
/// <param name="filePath">The file path to read the object instance from.</param>
/// <returns>Returns a new instance of the object read from the binary file.</returns>
public static T ReadFromBinaryFile<T>(string filePath)
{
    using (Stream stream = File.Open(filePath, FileMode.Open))
    {
        var binaryFormatter = new System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter();
        return (T)binaryFormatter.Deserialize(stream);
    }
}

XML

Requires the System.Xml assembly to be included in your project.

/// <summary>
/// Writes the given object instance to an XML file.
/// <para>Only Public properties and variables will be written to the file. These can be any type though, even other classes.</para>
/// <para>If there are public properties/variables that you do not want written to the file, decorate them with the [XmlIgnore] attribute.</para>
/// <para>Object type must have a parameterless constructor.</para>
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of object being written to the file.</typeparam>
/// <param name="filePath">The file path to write the object instance to.</param>
/// <param name="objectToWrite">The object instance to write to the file.</param>
/// <param name="append">If false the file will be overwritten if it already exists. If true the contents will be appended to the file.</param>
public static void WriteToXmlFile<T>(string filePath, T objectToWrite, bool append = false) where T : new()
{
    TextWriter writer = null;
    try
    {
        var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
        writer = new StreamWriter(filePath, append);
        serializer.Serialize(writer, objectToWrite);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (writer != null)
            writer.Close();
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Reads an object instance from an XML file.
/// <para>Object type must have a parameterless constructor.</para>
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of object to read from the file.</typeparam>
/// <param name="filePath">The file path to read the object instance from.</param>
/// <returns>Returns a new instance of the object read from the XML file.</returns>
public static T ReadFromXmlFile<T>(string filePath) where T : new()
{
    TextReader reader = null;
    try
    {
        var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
        reader = new StreamReader(filePath);
        return (T)serializer.Deserialize(reader);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (reader != null)
            reader.Close();
    }
}

Json

You must include a reference to Newtonsoft.Json assembly, which can be obtained from the Json.NET NuGet Package.

/// <summary>
/// Writes the given object instance to a Json file.
/// <para>Object type must have a parameterless constructor.</para>
/// <para>Only Public properties and variables will be written to the file. These can be any type though, even other classes.</para>
/// <para>If there are public properties/variables that you do not want written to the file, decorate them with the [JsonIgnore] attribute.</para>
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of object being written to the file.</typeparam>
/// <param name="filePath">The file path to write the object instance to.</param>
/// <param name="objectToWrite">The object instance to write to the file.</param>
/// <param name="append">If false the file will be overwritten if it already exists. If true the contents will be appended to the file.</param>
public static void WriteToJsonFile<T>(string filePath, T objectToWrite, bool append = false) where T : new()
{
    TextWriter writer = null;
    try
    {
        var contentsToWriteToFile = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(objectToWrite);
        writer = new StreamWriter(filePath, append);
        writer.Write(contentsToWriteToFile);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (writer != null)
            writer.Close();
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Reads an object instance from an Json file.
/// <para>Object type must have a parameterless constructor.</para>
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of object to read from the file.</typeparam>
/// <param name="filePath">The file path to read the object instance from.</param>
/// <returns>Returns a new instance of the object read from the Json file.</returns>
public static T ReadFromJsonFile<T>(string filePath) where T : new()
{
    TextReader reader = null;
    try
    {
        reader = new StreamReader(filePath);
        var fileContents = reader.ReadToEnd();
        return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(fileContents);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (reader != null)
            reader.Close();
    }
}

Example

// Write the list of objects to a file.
WriteToXmlFile<List<A>>("C:\myObjects.txt", _myList);

// Read the list of objects from the file back into a variable.
List<A> _myList = ReadFromXmlFile<List<A>>("C:\myObjects.txt");
share|improve this answer

Old topic, but I modified Tim Coker's answer above to utilize the using blocks to properly dispose of the stream objects and save only a single class instance at a time:

public static T Load<T>(string FileSpec) {
    XmlSerializer formatter = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));

    using (FileStream aFile = new FileStream(FileSpec, FileMode.Open)) {
        byte[] buffer = new byte[aFile.Length];
        aFile.Read(buffer, 0, (int)aFile.Length);

        using (MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(buffer)) {
            return (T)formatter.Deserialize(stream);
        }
    }
}

public static void Save<T>(T ToSerialize, string FileSpec) {
    Directory.CreateDirectory(FileSpec.Substring(0, FileSpec.LastIndexOf('\\')));
    FileStream outFile = File.Create(FileSpec);
    XmlSerializer formatter = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));

    formatter.Serialize(outFile, ToSerialize);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.