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I've got a file of CSS elements, and I'm trying to check for any duplicate CSS elements,.. then output the lines that show the dupe lines.

    ###Test
    ###ABC
    ###test
    ##.hello
    ##.ABC
    ##.test
    bob.com###Test
    ~qwerty.com###Test
    ~more.com##.ABC

###Test & ##.ABC already exists in the list, and I'd like a way to output the lines that are used in the file, basically duplication checking (case sensitive). So using the above list, I would generate something like this..

    Line 1: ###Test
    Line 7: bob.com###Test
    Line 8: ~qwerty.com###Test

    Line 5: ##.ABC
    Line 9: ~more.com##.ABC

Something in bash, or maybe perl?

Thanks :)

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4 Answers 4

I've been challenged by your problem, so I wrote you a script. Hope you liked it. :)

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

sub loadf($);

{
    my @file = loadf("style.css");
    my @inner = @file;
    my $l0 = 0; my $l1 = 0; my $l2 = 0; my $dc = 0; my $tc;
    foreach my $line (@file) {
        $l1++;
        $line =~ s/^\s+//;
        $line =~ s/\s+$//;
        foreach my $iline (@inner) {
            $l2++;
            $iline =~ s/^\s+//;
            $iline =~ s/\s+$//;
            next if ($iline eq $line);
            if ($iline =~ /\b$line\b/) {
                $dc++;
                if ($dc > 0) {
                    if ($l0 == 0) {
                        print "Line " . $l1 . ": " . $line . "\n";
                        $l0++;
                    }
                    print "Line " . $l2 . ": " . $iline . "\n";
                }
            }
        }
        print "\n" unless($dc == 0);
        $dc = 0; $l0 = 0; $l2 = 0;
    }
}

sub loadf($) {
    my @file = ( );
    open(FILE, $_[0] . "\n") or die("Couldn't Open " . $_[0] . "\n");
    @file = <FILE>;
    close(FILE);
    return @file;
}

__END__

This does exactly what you need. And sorry if it's a bit messy.

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Too many issues with that script, needs to check for end of lines, so Line 1781: ##.test Line 1782: ##.test-leaderboard Line 1787: ##.abc Line 1788: ##.abcng since ##.adc isn't the same as ##.abcng –  user349418 Nov 25 '10 at 3:34
    
@user349418 edited, try it again. –  Ruel Nov 25 '10 at 3:56

This seems to work:

sort -t '#' -k 2 inputfile

It groups them by the part after the # characters:

##.ABC
~more.com##.ABC
###ABC
##.hello
##.test
###test
bob.com###Test
~qwerty.com###Test
###Test

If you only want to see the unique values:

sort -t '#' -k 2 -u inputfile

Result:

##.ABC
###ABC
##.hello
##.test
###test
###Test

This pretty closely duplicates the example output in the question (it relies on some possibly GNU-specific features):

cat -n inputfile | 
  sed 's/^ *\([0-9]\)/Line \1:/' |
  sort -t '#' -k 2 |
  awk -F '#+' '{if (! seen[$2]) { \
      if ( count > 1) printf "%s\n", lines; \
      count = 0; \
      lines = "" \
    }; \
    seen[$2] = 1; \
    lines = lines "\n" $0; ++count}
    END {if (count > 1) print lines}'

Result:

Line 5: ##.ABC
Line 9: ~more.com##.ABC

Line 1: ###Test
Line 7: bob.com###Test
Line 8: ~qwerty.com###Test
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I think you might have a typo in the first example of sort. Is it possible you meant to type sort -t '#' -k 2 inputfile (without the -u)? –  martineno Nov 25 '10 at 4:26
    
@martineno: Yes, thanks. –  Dennis Williamson Nov 25 '10 at 7:21

I'd recommend using the uniq function if you can install MoreUtils:

how-do-i-print-unique-elements-in-perl-array

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Too much work.⁠ –  tchrist Nov 24 '10 at 13:13

Here is one way to do it, which is fairly easy to extend to multiple files if need be.

With this file find_dups.pl:

use warnings;
use strict;

my @lines;
while (<>) {                                     # read input lines
    s/^\s+//; s/\s+$//;                          # trim whitespace
    push @lines, {data => $_, line => $.} if $_  # store useful data
}

@lines = sort {length $$a{data} <=> length $$b{data}} @lines; # shortest first 

while (@lines) {
    my ($line, @found) = shift @lines;
    my $re = qr/\Q$$line{data}\E$/;              # search token 
    @lines = grep {                              # extract matches from @lines
        not $$_{data} =~ $re && push @found, $_
    } @lines;
    if (@found) {                                # write the report
        print "line $$_{line}: $$_{data}\n" for $line, @found;
        print "\n";
    }
}

then perl find_dups.pl input.css prints:

line 5: ##.ABC
line 9: ~more.com##.ABC

line 1: ###Test
line 7: bob.com###Test
line 8: ~qwerty.com###Test
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Tried this but it doesn't check for end of lines, for example, line 10476: test.com###plf-ysm line 10477: test.com###plf-ysm-side Arent the same. Otherwise its a decent script :) –  user349418 Nov 24 '10 at 22:03
    
@user349418 => test.com###plf-ysm is contained within test.com###plf-ysm-side and matches according to the test data you gave. I have made an edit that probably fixes the problem you have, but next time, please provide more test data. also, if you think an answer to your question is decent, there is an up arrow next to it you can click on. –  Eric Strom Nov 25 '10 at 3:55

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