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I have some question about AVL, lets assume I created some avl-tree of integers, how do I need to manage insertion into my tree to be able to take out the longest sequence of numbers, (insertion have to be with complexity O(logn)), for example:

          _   10   _
   _  7 _                _  12  _
6          8

in this case the longest sequence will be 6,7,8 so in my function void sequence(int* low, int* high) I'll do *low = 6, *high = 8...

comlexity of the function(sequence) have to be O(1)

thanks in advance for any idea

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my question was, how do I need to manage my insertion with complexity O(log(n), to be able to take out the longest sequence of the numbers with complexity O(1) –  rookie Nov 24 '10 at 13:50
1  
What do you mean by "longest sequence of numbers"? The height if the tree? The number of elements in it? –  MAK Nov 24 '10 at 14:08
    
@MAK: That question is a bit hard to answer, actually. Um. In poker, we'd call it a straight. Basically, if your total ordering has the possibility for immediate adjacency, where the next possible element in the ordering is your next actual element in sequence, then you can have a straight. He wants longest possible straight. –  Jake Kurzer Nov 24 '10 at 22:57
    
Can you tell me if there are any other constraints? Like a finite set of possible values? –  Jake Kurzer Nov 24 '10 at 23:06
    
@Jake Kurzer: yes, I initialize my data structure with finite number of numbers N... thanks for the answer –  rookie Nov 25 '10 at 6:53

2 Answers 2

Actually, if you build an interval list or something very-like-it, then store the components of it in an AVL tree, you could probably do okay. The thing is that you don't just want a given sequence, you want longest sequence. Longest run of lexically immediately adjacent keys*, to be more exact. Which, curiously, is quite hard I think without bashing up a custom metric to build your AVL tree on. I guess if your comparator for the AVL tree built on the interval list was f(length-of-interval), you could get it in o(logn) or maybe faster if your AVL implementation has fast max\min.

I'm terribly sorry, I was hoping to be more help, but the fact that we have to use an AVL tree is a little troubling. I'm wondering if there's a trick that one could pull involving sub-trees, but I'm simply seeing no good way to make such an approach o(1) without so much preprocessing as to be a joke. Something with bloom filters might work?

* Some total orderings can create similar runs, but not all have a meaningful concept of immediate adjacency in their... well... phase space I guess?**

**My lackluster formal education is really biting me right about now.

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The basic insertion & rotation in AVL Trees guarantees close to O(logn) performance.

Coming to the 2nd part of your question, to find the "complexity" of your sequence, you first need to find (or traverse to) the "low" element in your AVL Tree, that itself will take you AT MOST O(logn).

So O(1) sequence() complexity is out of the window... If O(1) is a must then maybe AVL tree is not your data structure here.

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Actually, if you build an interval list, then store the components of it in an AVL tree, you could probably do okay. The thing is that you don't just want a given sequence, you want longest sequence. Mind if I build on this answer? –  Jake Kurzer Nov 24 '10 at 22:48

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