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I'm calling a javascript function that sets the opacity of an iframe an unknown amount of times in rapid succession. Basically this tweens the alpha from 0 to 100. here is the code


   function setAlpha(value)
   {
       iframe.style.opacity = value * .01;
       iframe.style.filter = 'alpha(opacity =' + val + ')';
   }

My problem is that for the first time it is working in ie (7) and not in firefox (3.02). in Firefox I get a delay and then the contentdocument appears with an opacity of 100. If I stick an alert in it works, so I'm guessing it is a race condition (although I thought javascript was single threaded) and that the setAlpha function is being called before the last function has finished executing. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I've read the 'avoiding a javascript race condition post' but I think this qualifies as something different (plus I can't figure out how to apply that example to this one).

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Can you provide more information about how you are looping to call this function? –  Rob Jan 9 '09 at 2:12
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4 Answers

The issue is that most browsers don't repaint until there is a pause in the javascript execution.

This can be solved by using setTimeout, as others have suggested. However, I recommend using something like jQuery, or any of the javascript libraries to do animations. Running setTimeout 100 times is a bad idea because the length of the animation will vary based on the browser and speed of the user's computer. The correct way to do animations, is to specify how long they should last and check the system time to determine how far the animation should progress.

function fadeIn(elem,animation_length) {
   var start = (new Date()).getTime();

   var step = function() {
      window.setTimeout(function() {
        var pct = ((new Date()).getTime() - start)/animation_length;
        elem.style.opacity = Math.min(pct,1);
        if (pct < 1) 
           step();
      },20);
   };
   step();
}

[edit:] The code above is only to illustrate how to do animations based on the system clock instead of simple intervals. Please use a library to do animations. The code above will not work on IE, because IE uses "filter:opacity(xx)" instead of "opacity". Libraries will take care of this for you and also provide nice features such as completion events, and the ability to cancel the animation.

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Some browsers are smart enough to delay changes to the DOM until the call stack is empty.

This is a generally a smart thing to do. For example, if you call a function that changes an element to yellow, and immediately call a function that changes the same element back to it's original state, the browser shouldn't waste time making the change, since it should happen so quickly as to be imperceptible to a user.

The setTimeout(func, 0) trick is commonly used to force Javascript to delay execution of func until the call stack is empty.

In code:

function setAlpha(opacity){
   some_element.style.opacity = opacity;
}

/** 
* This WON'T work, because the browsers won't bother reflecting the 
* changes to the element's opacity until the call stack is empty, 
* which can't happen until fadeOut() returns (at the earliest)
**/
function fadeOut(){
    for (var i=0; i<10; i++){
        setAlpha(0.1*i);    
    }
}

/** 
* This works, because the call stack will be empty between calls
* to setAlpha()
**/
function fadeOut2(){
    var opacity = 1;
    setTimeout(function setAlphaStep(){
        setAlpha(opacity);
        if (opacity > 0){
            setTimeout(setAlphaStep, 10);        
        }
        opacity -= 0.1;  
    }, 0);
}

All this boils down to being a wonderful excuse to use one of many javascript libraries that handle this tricky stuff for you.

Edit: and here's a good article on the tricky Javascript call stack

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Are you using setTimeout or a tight loop? If you're using just a loop to call the function, then switch to using setTimout.

example:

   function setAlpha(value)
   {
       iframe.style.opacity = value * .01;
       iframe.style.filter = 'alpha(opacity =' + val + ')';
       if(value < 100 ) {
       setTimeout(function () {setAlpha(value+1)},20);
       }
   }
   setAlpha(0);

Because you see, it's not just javascript that's single threaded. It's the whole damn browser. If your javascript goes into a tightloop, you hang the whole browser. So the browser pauses waiting for javascript to finish, and doesn't even have a chance to update the screen, while your code is rapidly changing some dom values.

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Javascript doesn't run across multiple threads so you're safe from race conditions (ignoring upcoming Worker thread support in Safari and Firefox :D ).

Simple question, how are you calling setAlpha multiple times, firefox, safari and opera all coalesce style sheet updates -- eg. they won't repaint or even recalc style info while js is running unless they have to. So they will only paint if JS has completed.

So if you're doing

while(...) setAlpha(...)

they won't update, you'll probably need to use setTimeout to trigger multiple distinct calls to update the style.

An alternative would be to use a library such as jQuery, mootools,etc that i vaguely recall provide a simplified mechanism to do these types of animations and transitions. As an added bonus i believe at least a few libraries will also use webkit transition and animation css rules when available (eg. Safari, and i think the latest firefox builds)

[edit: caveat: i haen't actually used any of these libraries, i only read about what they're supposed to do. My sites render the same in lynx as any other browser because i couldn't design my way out of a paper bag :D ]

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