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I have simple web application based on JSP. Root of application looks like this:

|
|--META-INF
|--WEB-INF
|  `--web.xml
|--img
|--css
|--index.jsp
|--some1.jsp
|--some2.jsp
|--some3.jsp

Where web.xml contains lines below:

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>servlet-jsp</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>org.apache.jasper.servlet.JspServlet</servlet-class>
    <load-on-startup>1</load-on-startup>
</servlet>

<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>servlet-jsp</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/*.jsp</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>

Now I want change file structure of project - move all *.jsp files to special directory:

|
|--META-INF
|--WEB-INF
|  `--web.xml
|--img
|--css
|--jsp
   |--index.jsp
   |--some1.jsp
   |--some2.jsp
   |--some3.jsp

Can I configure "servlet-jsp" to process jsp/some1.jsp when "/some1.jsp" url requested?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think many (all?) containers already map *.jsp (in any directory) to the JSP servlet, so writing such an explicit servlet-mapping is only necessary if you want to use custom file extensions for your JSPs. To state it more directly: you can probably just remove the servlet-mapping you have written.

Forwarding requests for JSP files in / to /jsp might best be accomplished by defining a filter mapping. You will also need to write your own filter class. Filters are a little like Servlets, but instead of generating content like a JSP or Servlet would, they are a bit more like a traffic controller, [re]directing requests.

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Yes, just remove it. It makes no sense to duplicate the JspServlet in webapp's web.xml. Unless it's for some reason turned off on the servletcontainer (which in turn makes much less sense, I'd fix that first). –  BalusC Nov 24 '10 at 19:48
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>servlet-jsp</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/jsp/*.jsp</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>

I think this should do the trick.

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I am under the impression that these patterns are not allowed. But let him give it a try. –  Bozho Nov 24 '10 at 15:51
    
@Bozho: it's possible. Don't have right now an environment to test this. But from this document, it should be allowed. –  darioo Nov 24 '10 at 15:53
2  
only /path/* and *.ext are. a combination is not, as far as I remember. –  Bozho Nov 24 '10 at 16:03
    
@Bozho is right. This is disallowed. Read the servelt spec. –  BalusC Nov 24 '10 at 19:50

You can create a servlet that is mapped to /jsp/ then parse the path after the servlet mapping and forward to the JSP, using request.getRequestDispatcer(targetJsp).forward()

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