Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi I have a large list of data: http://paste-it.net/public/y17027d/ It is 67859 rows by 10 columns. The 6th column contains values that represent Z-Scores from 1 to 6 in .01 increments. What I would like to do is to total all of the other column values that have the same Z-score value, but my current code is not working.

What I have now prints out values but the totals for each Z-Score are incorrect.
Here is my code:

#! /usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use POSIX;
use Data::Dumper;



my $input = $ARGV[0];
open (DATAFILE, $input) or die $!;
open(OUT,">>"."final.output.txt");

my($line,$fMeasure,$filename,$recall,$precision,$z_score,$computer_calls,$johns_calls,$false_negatives,$false_positives,$true_positives,$count);
$fMeasure=$filename=$recall=$precision=$z_score=$computer_calls=$johns_calls=$false_negatives=$false_positives=$true_positives=$count = 0;




my %stats=();
my %zscore=();
while($line = <DATAFILE>){ 
     # Chop off new line character, skip the comments and empty lines.                 
     chomp($line); 
     my @temp = split(/\t/, $line);
     $true_positives = $temp[0];
     $false_positives = $temp[1];
     $false_negatives = $temp[2];
     $johns_calls = $temp[3];
     $computer_calls = $temp[4];
     $z_score = $temp[5];
     $fMeasure = $temp[6];
     $precision = $temp[7];
     $recall =  $temp[8];
     $filename = $temp[9];
     $stats{$z_score}{$filename}[0] = $true_positives;
     $stats{$z_score}{$filename}[1] = $false_positives;
     $stats{$z_score}{$filename}[2] = $johns_calls;
     $stats{$z_score}{$filename}[3] = $computer_calls;
     $stats{$z_score}{$filename}[4] = $fMeasure;
     $stats{$z_score}{$filename}[5] = $precision;
     $stats{$z_score}{$filename}[6] = $recall;
     $stats{$z_score}{$filename}[6] = $filename;
     $zscore{$z_score}++;

}


my $false_positives_new = 0;
my $true_positives_new = 0;
my $johns_calls_new = 0; 
my $computer_calls_new = 0;
my $file_name = 0;


foreach $z_score ( sort keys %stats ) {
foreach $filename( keys %{$stats{$z_score}} ){
    my $tp = $stats{$z_score}{$filename}[0];
    my $fp = $stats{$z_score}{$filename}[1];
    my $jc = $stats{$z_score}{$filename}[2];
    my $cc = $stats{$z_score}{$filename}[3];
    my $fn = $stats{$z_score}{$filename}[6];
    #print "$z_score\t$jc\n";
    $false_positives_new = $false_positives + $fp;
    $true_positives_new = $true_positives + $tp;
    $johns_calls_new = $johns_calls + $jc; 
    $computer_calls_new = $computer_calls + $cc;

    #print OUT "$fn\n";
}

print OUT"$true_positives_new\t$false_positives_new\t$johns_calls_new\t$computer_calls_new\t$z_score  \n";
$false_positives_new = 0;
$true_positives_new = 0;
$johns_calls_new = 0;
$computer_calls_new = 0;
$file_name = 0;

}



close(OUT);
close (DATAFILE);

I know that I must be doing something wrong but I am not able to figure out what. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you

share|improve this question
    
What is Math::Complex doing in there? –  Sinan Ünür Nov 24 '10 at 15:59
    
Nothing now but I will most likely alter the program later and will require it. It should not affect the functionality of the code though. –  Alos Nov 24 '10 at 16:01
    
I have a hard time grasping how complex numbers would come in to data tabulation, but anyway. –  Sinan Ünür Nov 24 '10 at 16:05
    
I removed Math::Complex –  Alos Nov 24 '10 at 16:08
    
That huge variable declaration/initialization line at the beginning is incredibly ugly, and totally unnecessary. –  Ether Nov 24 '10 at 17:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you want to say

$false_positives_new = $false_positives_new + $fp;
# etc.

instead of

$false_positives_new = $false_positives + $fp;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you mobrule that was a good catch! –  Alos Nov 24 '10 at 17:29
    
@Alos: I hope this does not mean you are going to keep using these variables instead of a hash. –  Sinan Ünür Nov 24 '10 at 17:55
    
@Sinan no I have since modified it to use a hash. Thanks –  Alos Dec 13 '10 at 14:17

OK. I was able to get the data from pastebin and I think the following code does what you want.

#! /usr/bin/perl

use strict; use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my ($input) = @ARGV;
open my $DATAFILE, '<', $input
    or die "Cannot open '$input': $!";

my @field_names = qw(
    fMeasure
    recall
    precision
    z_score
    computer_calls
    johns_calls
    false_negatives
    false_positives
    true_positives
    count
);

my @track_fields = qw(
    false_positives
    false_negatives
    johns_calls
    computer_calls
);

my (%stats, %by_zscore);

while ( my $line = <$DATAFILE> ) {
    last unless $line =~ /\S/;
    chomp $line;
    my @temp = split /\t/, $line;
    my $filename = pop @temp;

    my %fields;
    @fields{ @field_names } = @temp;

    my $z_score = $fields{z_score};

    $stats{ $z_score }{$filename} = \@temp;

    for my $f ( @track_fields ) {
        $by_zscore{$z_score}{ $f } += $fields{ $f };
    }
}

print Dumper \%by_zscore;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Sinan –  Alos Nov 24 '10 at 16:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.