Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In other words, can I do something like

for() {
    for {
       for {
       }
    }
}

Except N times? In other words, when the method creating the loops is called, it is given some parameter N, and the method would then create N of these loops nested one in another?

Of course, the idea is that there should be an "easy" or "the usual" way of doing it. I already have an idea for a very complicated one.

share|improve this question
    
Can you clarify what parameters would be within each for()? –  Greg Case Jan 9 '09 at 2:43
    
I'm just curious, what was your "complicated" way of doing n-level loops? –  Dan Herbert Jan 9 '09 at 3:32

10 Answers 10

up vote 18 down vote accepted

It sounds like you may want to look into recursion.

share|improve this answer
    
Got me by 1 second. –  Michael Haren Jan 9 '09 at 2:42
2  
... and learn the meaning of the term "Stack Overflow"! :) –  Sarel Botha Jan 9 '09 at 2:43
    
Maybe quicksort could be a good example –  Herrmann Jan 9 '09 at 3:06
    
This still does not answer the question. For-iteration IS a kind of recursion. Perhaps you intend to include an example of mutual recursion? –  Apocalisp Jan 9 '09 at 6:59
    
Man..I can't think of a good, compact, example –  jjnguy Jan 9 '09 at 14:19

jjnguy is right; recursion lets you dynamically create variable-depth nesting. However, you don't get access to data from the outer layers without a little more work. The "in-line-nested" case:

for (int i = lo; i < hi; ++i) {
    for (int j = lo; j < hi; ++j) {
        for (int k = lo; k < hi; ++k) {
            // do something **using i, j, and k**
        }
    }
}

keeps the variables i, j, and k in scope for the innermost body to use.

Here's one quick hack to do that:

public class NestedFor {

    public static interface IAction {
        public void act(int[] indices);
    }

    private final int lo;
    private final int hi;
    private final IAction action;

    public NestedFor(int lo, int hi, IAction action) {
        this.lo = lo;
        this.hi = hi;
        this.action = action;
    }

    public void nFor (int depth) {
        n_for (0, new int[0], depth);
    }

    private void n_for (int level, int[] indices, int maxLevel) {
        if (level == maxLevel) {
            action.act(indices);
        } else {
            int newLevel = level + 1;
            int[] newIndices = new int[newLevel];
            System.arraycopy(indices, 0, newIndices, 0, level);
            newIndices[level] = lo;
            while (newIndices[level] < hi) {
                n_for(newLevel, newIndices, maxLevel);
                ++newIndices[level];
            }
        }
    }
}

The IAction interface stipulates the role of a controlled action which takes an array of indices as the argument to its act method.

In this example, each instance of NestedFor is configured by the constructor with the iteration limits and the action to be performed by the innermost level. The parameter of the nFor method specifies how deeply to nest.

Here's a sample usage:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; ++i) {
        final int depth = i;
        System.out.println("Depth " + depth);
        IAction testAction = new IAction() {
            public void act(int[] indices) {
                System.out.print("Hello from level " + depth + ":");
                for (int i : indices) { System.out.print(" " + i); }
                System.out.println();
            }
        };
        NestedFor nf = new NestedFor(0, 3, testAction);
        nf.nFor(depth);
    }
}

and the (partial) output from its execution:

Depth 0
Hello from level 0:
Depth 1
Hello from level 1: 0
Hello from level 1: 1
Hello from level 1: 2
Depth 2
Hello from level 2: 0 0
Hello from level 2: 0 1
Hello from level 2: 0 2
Hello from level 2: 1 0
Hello from level 2: 1 1
Hello from level 2: 1 2
Hello from level 2: 2 0
Hello from level 2: 2 1
Hello from level 2: 2 2
Depth 3
Hello from level 3: 0 0 0
Hello from level 3: 0 0 1
Hello from level 3: 0 0 2
Hello from level 3: 0 1 0
...
Hello from level 3: 2 1 2
Hello from level 3: 2 2 0
Hello from level 3: 2 2 1
Hello from level 3: 2 2 2
share|improve this answer
    
This should be the correct answer! –  Skip Head Jan 9 '09 at 4:49
    
@Pacerier, yes, the explicit recursion occurs in the private n_for method on the NestedFor class. (I would write this differently in Java 8, of course :) –  joel.neely Jun 3 at 13:19

You might want to explain what you really want to do.

If the outer for loops are doing nothing but controlling a count, then your nested for loops are simply a more complicated way of iterating by a count that could be handled by a single for loop.

For example:

for (x = 0; x < 10; ++x) {
  for (y = 0; y < 5; ++y) {
    for (z = 0; z < 20; ++z) {
      DoSomething();
    }
  }
}

Is equivalent to:

for (x = 0; x < 10*5*20; ++x) {
  DoSomething();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good answer. This captures the essence of nesting loops. See my answer for a generalization of this idea. –  Apocalisp Jan 9 '09 at 5:27
    
@Michael, It's quite obvious this is not the case.... –  Pacerier Jun 1 at 22:08

I was actually thinking about this the other day.

An example that is probably not perfect but pretty close to what I think is being asked would be printing out a directory tree

public void printTree(directory) {
   for(files in directory) {
      print(file);
      if(file is directory) {
          printTree(file);
      }
   }
}

this way you end up with a stack of for loops nested inside each other, without the hassle of figuring out exactly how they should go together.

share|improve this answer
    
Apparently you are supposed to do something not what I did to add code.. –  Wayne Jan 9 '09 at 3:24
    
@Wayne: I fixed the formatting, just indent your code by four spaces. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 9 '09 at 3:31
    
Your printTree function doesn't print anything.. –  dancavallaro Jan 9 '09 at 3:34
2  
use your imagination... –  Wayne Jan 9 '09 at 3:42
    
This is a typical use for recursion, where you are traversing a recursive datastructure. –  Rolf Rander Jan 9 '09 at 8:40

Problem needs more specification. Maybe recursion will help you, but keep in mind that recursion is almost always an alternative to iteration, and vice versa. It may be that a 2-level nested loop can be sufficient for your needs. Just let us know what problem you're trying to solve.

share|improve this answer

The essential idea behind nesting loops is multiplication.

Expanding on Michael Burr's answer, if the outer for loops are doing nothing but controlling a count, then your nested for loops over n counts are simply a more complicated way of iterating over the product of the counts with a single for loop.

Now, let's extend this idea to Lists. If you're iterating over three lists in nested loops, this is simply a more complicated way of iterating over the product of the lists with a single loop. But how do you express the product of three lists?

First, we need a way of expressing the product of types. The product of two types X and Y can be expressed as a generic type like P2<X, Y>. This is just a value that consists of two values, one of type X, the other of type Y. It looks like this:

public abstract class P2<A, B> {
  public abstract A _p1();
  public abstract B _p2();
}

For a product of three types, we just have P3<A, B, C>, with the obvious third method. A product of three lists, then, is achieved by distributing the List functor over the product type. So the product of List<X>, List<Y>, and List<Z> is simply List<P3<X, Y, Z>>. You can then iterate over this list with a single loop.

The Functional Java library has a List type that supports multiplying lists together using first-class functions and product types (P2, P3, etc. which are also included in the library).

For example:

for (String x : xs) {
   for (String y : ys) {
     for (String z : zs) {
       doSomething(x, y, z);
     }
   }
}

Is equivalent to:

for (P3<String, String, String> p : xs.map(P.p3()).apply(ys).apply(zs)) {
   doSomething(p._1(), p._2(), p._3());
}

Going further with Functional Java, you can make doSomething first-class, as follows. Let's say doSomething returns a String:

public static final F<P3<String, String, String>, String> doSomething =
  new F<P3<String, String, String>, String>() {
    public String f(final P3<String, String, String> p) {
      return doSomething(p._1(), p._2(), p._3());
    }
  };

Then you can eliminate the for-loop altogether, and collect the results of all the applications of doSomething:

List<String> s = xs.map(P.p3()).apply(ys).apply(zs).map(doSomething);
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't this actually employing recursion as well internally? –  Pacerier Jun 1 at 22:10

To demonstrate that recursion is not the only way of doing such a thing, here's another pretty simple way. This allows you to simply set a range for each for-loop variable, as well as maintain access to all of them at any level:

public class NNestedForLoop {

    // Number of for loops.
    static int n;

    // Arrays of length 'n'.
    static int[] indices; // Keeps each index in for loops.
    static int[] ranges;  // Range of each index in for loops.

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        // Change the variables here.
        n = 3;
        ranges = new int[] {2,3,2};


        indices = new int[n];

        // Start off at indices = [0,...,0]
        System.out.println( java.util.Arrays.toString(indices) );
        do {
            advanceIndices();
            System.out.println( java.util.Arrays.toString(indices) );
        }
        while( !allMaxed() );

    }

    // Advances 'indices' to the next in sequence.
    static void advanceIndices() {

        for(int i=n-1; i>=0; i--) {
            if(indices[i]+1 == ranges[i]) {
                indices[i] = 0;
            }
            else {
                indices[i] += 1;
                break;
            }
        }

    }

    // Tests if indices are in final position.
    static boolean allMaxed() {

        for(int i=n-1; i>=0; i--) {
            if(indices[i] != ranges[i]-1) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;

    }

}

Output:

[0, 0, 0]
[0, 0, 1]
[0, 1, 0]
[0, 1, 1]
[0, 2, 0]
[0, 2, 1]
[1, 0, 0]
[1, 0, 1]
[1, 1, 0]
[1, 1, 1]
[1, 2, 0]
[1, 2, 1]

Obviously, you could do something more interesting than print the indices at each step. If you need to do something after, say, the n-1th for loop, but still in the nth: you can use:

if( indices[(n-1) -1] == 0 ) {
    // Do something inspirational...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great answer. I prefer this one over recursion –  liang Apr 15 at 2:39
String fors(int n){
StringBuilder bldr = new StringBuilder();
for(int i = 0; i < n; i++){
    for(int j = 0; j < i; j++){
        bldr.append('\t');
    }
    bldr.append("for() {\n");
}
for(int i = n-1; i >= 0; i--){
    for(int j = 0; j < i; j++){
        bldr.append('\t');
    }
    bldr.append("}\n");
}
return bldr.toString();
}

Creates a nice nested for-loop skeleton ;-) Not completely serious and i'm aware that a recursive solution would have been more elegant.

share|improve this answer
1  
So you propose generating code at runtime? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Aug 22 '11 at 10:43
    
no, i'm just saying the question is not clear. The whole issue could also be something like "how do i get my IDE to give me a n-level for-loop template". My code is pretty far away from generating code at runtime, it was meant as code-generation at development-time, aka templates. Btw. the author has not once said he wanted to execute the loops right away. I am just interpreting the question a little different than the other people who answered it before me. –  Michael Kutschke Aug 22 '11 at 11:12
    
You can always generate a perl file from java code and then execute it. :) And we are totally serious about doing so. :) –  Ajeet Feb 18 '13 at 8:20
public void recursiveFor(Deque<Integer> indices, int[] ranges, int n) {

    if (n != 0) {

       for (int i = 0; i < ranges[n-1]; i++) {

          indices.push(i);
          recursiveFor(indices, ranges, n-1);
          indices.pop();
       }
    }

    else {

       // inner most loop body, access to the index values thru indices
       System.out.println(indices);
    }
}

Sample call:

int[] ranges = {2, 2, 2};

recursiveFor(new ArrayDeque<Integer>(), ranges, ranges.length);
share|improve this answer

In the interest of conciseness I am putting my code here :

void variDepth(int depth, int n, int i) {
    cout<<"\n d = "<<depth<<" i = "<<i;
    if(!--depth) return;
    for(int i = 0;i<n;++i){
        variDepth(depth,n,i);
    }
}
void testVariDeapth()
{   variDeapth(3, 2,0);
}

Output

 d = 3 i = 0
 d = 2 i = 0
 d = 1 i = 0
 d = 1 i = 1
 d = 2 i = 1
 d = 1 i = 0
 d = 1 i = 1
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.