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I was asked the output of the following code in my interview yesterday

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void){
       printf ("%x" ,-1<<4); 
}

I was given 2 minutes to tell the answer. I responded fffffff0. The result of the interview has not been declared yet. I want to know was my answer correct?

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1  
Doesn't that depend on the representation of signed integers? –  You Nov 24 '10 at 17:46
29  
Well, there's one way to find out. Compile and run the code, silly! –  cdhowie Nov 24 '10 at 17:46
8  
@cdhowie - if you're joking, it's funny but probably not fully apparent to the OP. If you're not, shame on you. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 24 '10 at 18:07
    
In addition to the -1<<4 issue, the program has undefined behaviour because there's no return statement in main (this could have practical implications to the "output" question on some platform - can imagine the clean up code that flushes buffers to stdout at the OS level might not get invoked). –  Tony D Nov 25 '10 at 0:45
4  
@Tony: main doesn't need a return statement. See stackoverflow.com/questions/2637671 –  MSalters Nov 25 '10 at 10:23
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8 Answers

up vote 46 down vote accepted

Technically left-shifting a negative integer invokes Undefined Behaviour. That means -1<<4 is UB. I dont know why they asked you this question. Probably they wanted to test your depth of knowledge of the C and C++ Standards.

C99 [6.5.7/4] says

The result of E1 << E2 is E1 left-shifted E2 bit positions; vacated bits are filled with zeros. If E1 has an unsigned type, the value of the result is E1× 2E2, reduced modulo one more than the maximum value representable in the result type. If E1 has a signed type and nonnegative value, and E1× 2E2 is representable in the result type, then that is the resulting value; otherwise, the behavior is undefined.

C++03 makes it undefined behaviour by omitting the relevant text.

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22  
Either they wanted to test depth of knowledge, or they just plain don't know. I've been to more than a few interviews where they didn't actually know the correct answer to a technical question. More often than not, especially early stages, the interviewer is HR or management. As I learned, the somewhat hard way, being highly proficient on the technical aspects doesn't help at all in becoming management...can even hurt your chances. And HR...it's just not their area at all. Trick questions like this are often asked by the least knowledgeable...in my experience. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 24 '10 at 18:05
    
kkk thankx for that info. i will wait for the results. –  Girish Mittal Nov 24 '10 at 18:14
2  
@Noah: Yeah - I remember being told I was wrong about there being such a thing as a signed char type when I mentioned it in a response to being asked about the difference between unsigned char and plain-old char. But that was by a technical lead, not HR or management. –  Michael Burr Nov 24 '10 at 18:35
    
I'd need to check, but my understanding of the C standard was that shifting by a negative value was indeed undefined, but that shifting a negative value was "implementation-defined", i.e. it doesn't have to be the same on all platforms, but it needs to be defined. In any case, on any recent platform, -1<<4 better give -16 or else there's a lot of things that will break (starting with most media codecs). –  Jean-Marc Valin Nov 24 '10 at 19:21
3  
@Jean-Marc: Prasoons' answer quotes directly from the C99 standard. Left-shifting a negative value is undefined behavior. However, if right shifting a negative value, the result is implementation defined. –  Michael Burr Nov 24 '10 at 21:55
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No. You're not correct. That's the bad news. Good news is that the interviewer probably doesn't know that and will assume you are because it's the result THEY get when they compile and run it.

True answer is that it is implementation defined. I'm not 100% confident to say it IS undefined behavior because of the overload, but I think it may be. At the very least though the result is dependent upon how negative numbers are represented, etc... Neither language you've claimed this is in define what the output will be.

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3  
Its UB in C and in C++ :) –  Prasoon Saurav Nov 24 '10 at 17:55
3  
...and I said that I thought it was. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 24 '10 at 17:58
    
"Because of the overload"? Do you mean the "overloading" of tagging the question with c and c++? If so: Could you possibly have chosen a more ambiguous term? :-P –  j_random_hacker Jan 9 '11 at 10:11
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On my machine:

chris@zack:~$ cat > test.c
#include <stdio.h>
int main(void){
       printf ("%x" ,-1<<4);
}

chris@zack:~$ gcc -o test test.c && ./test
fffffff0

However, the result will depend on your architecture and compiler. So the correct answer is "it could output anything."

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1  
Irrelevant, but interesting. Nevertheless, there is nothing about my answer that is incorrect. –  cdhowie Nov 24 '10 at 17:58
3  
"This answer is not useful." - quit crying about points. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 24 '10 at 17:59
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Not complaining about points (I'm capped anyway, I could care less) but when someone downvotes I usually expect them to leave feedback as to why, so that I have the opportunity to improve my answer. –  cdhowie Nov 24 '10 at 18:02
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I don't see how compiler output is irrelevant. I would argue that it's more relevant than quoting the standard. Especially when you get the same output for every compiler that anybody cares about. –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 24 '10 at 18:05
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@PigBen compiler output is irrelevant because it is undefined behavior and the result may change for the next release of <insert name of your favorite compiler here> –  Praetorian Nov 24 '10 at 18:16
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Binary of 1  : 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 00001

Replace occurrence of 0 with 1 as you are going to calculate binary of negative no

How to calculate binary of negative numbers

Binary of -1 : 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 11111

Left shift 4 : 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 0000

Hex Representation of of resultant Left shift 4 will be

1111 : F 

0000 : 0

so calculated output will be :

FFFFFFF0

Your answer is Right.

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2  
And who says the machine has to use twos complement? –  Martin Beckett Oct 23 '11 at 3:31
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Left shifting a negative number is undefined for the general case but we have to understand why this undefined behavior (UB)? Keep in mind that Most Significant Bit (MSb) is the sign bit. If this bit is a 1 the number is negative. If it is a zero the number is positive. This is critical information is lost with the first left shift. For example

-32768<<4

is the same thing as

0x8000<<4

(assuming a 16 bit machine for simplicity)

The result is, of course, 0 which doesn't really make any sense and is therefore UB.

In the specific case of the interview question from the OP, there is only one specific value we are concerned with...not the general case. -1 (0xffffffff on a 32 bit machine) shifted left 4 times will yield 0xfffffff0 as the OP originally thought.

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What you're describing is not undefined behavior, it's unspecified/implementation defined (depending on doc reqs). Furthermore, -1 is not always '1111...111'. It could be '1000...0001' or '111...1110'. I'm still not completely convinced that -1 << X is undefined (the first sentence in 5.8/2 would seem to allow it), but we still can't say what the result is going to be without knowing what kind of negative number representation is being used and how large the type is. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 24 '10 at 20:29
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If it is undefined, my guess as to reason is the possible involvement of overflow exceptions that's addition to the picture would mean the committee couldn't guarantee it to be even possible to let the program continue or how the OS would respond to such an event. THAT is undefined behavior. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 24 '10 at 20:32
    
@Noah - I didn't realize -1 was represented by something other than '1111...111'. Just out of curiosity, what kind (examples ?) of implementation does not use '1111...111' to represent -1? –  semaj Nov 24 '10 at 21:26
    
1  
@semaj: The C standard allows implementations using 2's complement, 1's complement and sign-magnitude representations. –  ninjalj Nov 24 '10 at 21:50
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It's undefined behavior.

$ cat undef.c 
#include <stdio.h>
int main(void){
       printf ("%x" ,-1<<4); 
}
$ clang -fsanitize=undefined undef.c
$ ./a.out
undef.c:3:24: runtime error: left shift of negative value -1
fffffff0
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I ran this code on 3 different compilers and OS. All gave me this same answer as mentioned in the question. Until and unless someone came up with the compiler on which this is really undefined behavior, I will say the answer is RIGHT. If this is stable in 99.99% of the situations, then there are more chances of standard getting changed, than the compiler stop supporting it.

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7  
Well, on 16-bit DOS the answer is fff0. –  Christoffer Nov 26 '10 at 11:20
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I just wrote the code in a text file, compiled it, and YES, the answer is correct.

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3  
I usually upvote to counter anonymous downvotes, but in this case the answer is not only wrong but actively misguiding. Checking the behavior of a program compiled with a particular compiler and run on a particular system doesn't tell you what the standard requires (not to mention that the compiler can have a bug). Almost-exception: Comeau is a very conforming compiler that you can generally trust, and it's a great idea to test small code snippets with Comeau Online (free), but even Comeau has some bugs... –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 24 '10 at 18:15
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@Akf: I understand. Thank you for your advice. It's been a long time since I worked with a compiled language and forgot all of this. I deserve the downvotes. Lesson learned u_u –  Erik Escobedo Nov 24 '10 at 18:57
    
+1 for a good attitude anyway :-). Might as well delete the answer though...? Same point's exhaustingly covered by cdhowie, who for no more reason than having cut-and-pasted his code, got 3 votes! @Alf: useful insight re Comeau's to share - thanks (interesting counter-example here though - as you'd know, even Comeau compiles/test-runs on some particular CPU, so it's shift behaviour here is no more authoratative than any other compilers / this is a case where undefined behaviour can be expected to be allowed to fall through to the CPU level rather than a Standards-compliance issue). –  Tony D Nov 25 '10 at 0:56
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