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My code compiles but throws an the exception: "An unhandled exception of type 'System, Access Violation Exception' occured in HealthCareProvider.exe Additional Information: Attempted to read or write protected memory. . ." HELP??

Problem is with print() method. I don't know why. Iterator only prints out a bunch different numbers (needs toString ())

Humbly,

Mike

#ifndef _HEALTHCAREPROVIDER_H
#define _HEALTHCAREPROVIDER_H

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class HealthCareProvider{

public:

 //constructor
 HealthCareProvider(const string &lname, const string &fname, const string &type, const int &yearsExperience, const string &coType):
 lastName(lname),firstName(fname),providerType(type),yearsExp(yearsExperience),companyType(coType)
 {
 }

 //Last Name
 void setLastName(const string &lname){
  lastName = lname;
 } 

 string getLastName()const{
  return lastName;
 }

 ... etc.

 //coType
 void setCompanyType(const int &coType){
  companyType = coType;
 } 

 string getCompanyType()const{
  return companyType;
 }

 void print() const {
  cout<<"Name: "<< getLastName()<<", " <<getFirstName()<<"\nType : "<<getProviderType()<<"\nYears Experience: "<<getYearsExp()<<" \nCompany Type : "<<getCompanyType()<<endl;
 }

 virtual double billForTreatment() = 0;


private:

 int yearsExperience, yearsExp;
 string type, coType, lname, fname;
 string lastName, firstName, providerType, companyType;


};

#endif




#include <vector>
#include <list>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <typeinfo>
#include <iterator>
#include "HealthCareProvider.h"
#include "Dentist.h"

using namespace std;

int main (){

  string value;

  cout << fixed << setprecision (2);

  //populate 
  vector < HealthCareProvider*> healthCareProviders (6);

  healthCareProviders [0]=new Dentist("Thatcher","Donald","Dentist",10, "sole proprietorship"); 

  healthCareProviders [1]=new Dentist("Parker","Michelle","Dentist",5, "LLC"); 

  healthCareProviders [2]= new Dentist("Bradford","Michael","Dentist",12, "LLC"); 

  healthCareProviders [3] = new Dentist("Craig","Elizabeth","Dentist",4, "sole proprietorship");

  for (size_t i=0; i<healthCareProviders.size(); i++){
   healthCareProviders[i] ->print();
   cout<<endl;
  }

  for (size_t j =0; j< healthCareProviders.size(); j++){
   delete healthCareProviders [j];   
  }


  cout<<"Pause . . ."<<endl;
  cin>>value;

}
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried running through a debugged and stepping through the code line by line until it crashes? This will tell you EXACTLY where it crashes. –  Goz Nov 24 '10 at 18:02

2 Answers 2

You are creating a vector of size 6 but you have initialized only the first 4 entries. The remaining two pointers are NULL and that's why you get an access violation when you call healthCareProviders[i] ->print();.

A simple solution would be to use vector::push_back to add elements as required instead of specifying the size ahead of time:

healthCareProviders.push_back(new Dentist(...));
share|improve this answer
    
Yep, not entirely obvious to a novice. +1 –  Crazy Eddie Nov 24 '10 at 18:10

If you re-write your code as follows:

//populate 
  vector < HealthCareProvider*> healthCareProviders;

  healthCareProviders.push_back( new Dentist("Thatcher","Donald","Dentist",10, "sole proprietorship") ); 

  healthCareProviders.push_back( new Dentist("Parker","Michelle","Dentist",5, "LLC") ); 

  healthCareProviders.push_back( new Dentist("Bradford","Michael","Dentist",12, "LLC") ); 

  healthCareProviders.push_back( new Dentist("Craig","Elizabeth","Dentist",4, "sole proprietorship") );

Then you will no longer have the problem.

You intialise the vector to have 6 elements and then only fill 4 of them up. If you wish to reserve space to later push entries into the vector use the "reserve" function. This allocates the memory but does not change the "size" of the vector.

share|improve this answer
    
Although correct, you don't explain why, which is more important. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 24 '10 at 18:10

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