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My program goes into a directory and searches for pdf files to parse them. This program is always running so I need to make sure to don't parse the same file over again.

I used a list to store the file names and then check if they are in there.

My code does not work in respect to that, if anyone can take a look and see whats wrong it would be greatly appreciated.

FileInfo[] filePaths = di.GetFiles("*.pdf");
for (int i = 0; i < filePaths.Length; i++)
{
    foreach (string fileName in usedFileNames)
    {
        if (fileName.Equals(filePaths[i].Name))
        {
            isInList = true;
        }
        else
        {
            isInList = false;
        }
    }
    if (isInList == false)
    {
        PDFReaderChooser chooser = new PDFReaderChooser(filePaths[i].Name);
        usedFileNames.Add(filePaths[i].Name);
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Your code doesn't work because you have to insert a break statement after "isInList = true;". – as-cii Nov 24 '10 at 19:27
    
@AS-CII: that doesn't make any sense, as he tests isInList == false later; it's effectively breaking there... – Domenic Nov 24 '10 at 19:31
    
Yes but every time the loop executes the isInList variable updates also if a fileName is found. Example: #1 - Equal, isInList = true; #2 - NotEqual, isInList = false. In this case the last value that the variable assumes is false and so the result is completely wrong. If you don't trust me, test the code yourself :) P.s. An alternative could also be to remove the else statement. – as-cii Nov 24 '10 at 19:34
    
I'll back up AS-CII with an example. Assume filePaths contains one item, "first.pdf", and that usedFileNames contains two items, "first.pdf" and "second.pdf". Now let's trace through the code. – phoog Nov 24 '10 at 19:38
    
You're totally right AS-CII; I just didn't think through the next iteration. The else is so far outside of what I would do normally that I just kind of glossed over it; the alternative of removing it is exactly what I'm used to. – Domenic Nov 24 '10 at 19:40

More concise still:

var fileNames = di.GetFiles("*.pdf")
                  .Select(f => f.Name)
                  .Where(n => !usedFileNames.Contains(n));
usedFileNames.AddRange(fileNames);

foreach (var fileName in fileNames)
{
    var chooser = new PDFReaderChooser(fileName);
}

This nicely abstracts away the logic that figures out which file names you need to process (outside the loop), from the logic that processes them (inside the loop).

share|improve this answer
    
lol I was just writing this. 2 seconds too slow I suppose. +1 – Kelly Nov 24 '10 at 19:20
    
Haha that makes me feel better about my own "two seconds two slow" on another question ten minutes ago :D – Domenic Nov 24 '10 at 19:22

While the other answers are better solutions to the problem, they don't explain why the original code didn't work. The problem is that the algorithm overwrites the value of the isInList variable, which will therefore only be true for the last file in the list. This would fix that problem:

FileInfo[] filePaths = di.GetFiles("*.pdf"); 
for (int i = 0; i < filePaths.Length; i++) 
{ 
    isInList = false
    foreach (string fileName in usedFileNames) 
    { 
        if (fileName.Equals(filePaths[i].Name)) 
        { 
            isInList = true;
            break;
        } 
    } 
    if (isInList == false) 
    { 
        PDFReaderChooser chooser = new PDFReaderChooser(filePaths[i].Name); 
        usedFileNames.Add(filePaths[i].Name); 
    } 
} 

I would add that it is better to use a HashSet instead of a List for your usedFileNames collection. The hash set is designed to determine efficiently whether it contains a given item. The list, if I recall correctly, does a linear search, which (for large numbers of items) is inefficient.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for good explanation of original problem, and a special invisible +1 for mention of HashSet; that's not something I do in my own code, but I should!! – Domenic Nov 24 '10 at 19:41

A LINQ Contains operation would make this much more concise (assuming usedFileNames is a List<string>):

FileInfo[] filePaths = di.GetFiles("*.pdf");
foreach(FileInfo myInfo in filePaths)
{
    if (!usedFileNames.Contains(myInfo.Name))
    {
        PDFReaderChooser chooser = new PDFReaderChooser(myInfo.Name);
        usedFileNames.Add(myInfo.Name);
    }

}
share|improve this answer

Try this:

FileInfo[] filePaths = di.GetFiles("*.pdf");
foreach(FileInfo fInfo in filePaths)
{
    if (!usedFileNames.Contains(fInfo.Name))
    {
        PDFReaderChooser chooser = new PDFReaderChooser(fInfo.Name);
        usedFileNames.Add(fInfo.Name);
    }
}

As I commented on your question, the code you posted doesn't work because you have to insert a break statement, like this:

for (int i = 0; i < filePaths.Length; i++)
{
    bool isInList = false;

    foreach (string fileName in usedFileNames)
    {
        if (fileName.Equals(filePaths[i].Name))
            isInList = true;
    }

    if (isInList == false)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Not in list! #{0}", x);
        usedFileNames.Add(filePaths[i].Name);
    }
}

Anyway I recommend you to use one of the techniques shown in this question replies.

share|improve this answer
    
May I suggest a foreach? – Domenic Nov 24 '10 at 19:17
    
Well, I hadn't changed the code because maybe he has to use the counter. Anyway I fix it. Thanks :) – as-cii Nov 24 '10 at 19:19

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