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I'm reading a book on WCF and author debates about pros of using message-level security over using transport-level security. Anyways, I can't find any logic in author's arguments

One limitation of transport security is that it relies on every “step” and participant in the network path having consistently configured security. In other words, if a message must travel through an intermediary before reaching its destination, there is no way to ensure that transport security has been enabled for the step after the intermediary (unless that interme- diary is fully controlled by the original service provider). If that security is not faithfully reproduced, the data may be compromised downstream.

Message security focuses on ensuring the integrity and privacy of individ- ual messages, without regard for the network. Through mechanisms such as encryption and signing via public and private keys, the message will be protected even if sent over an unprotected transport (such as plain HTTP).

a)

If that security is not faithfully reproduced, the data may be compromised downstream.

True, but assuming two systems communicating use SSL and thus certificates, then the data they exchange can't be decrypted by intermediary, but instead it can only be altered, which the receiver will notice and thus reject the packet?!

b) Anyways, as far as I understand the above quote, it is implying that if two systems establish a SSL connection, and if intermediary system S has SSL enabled and if S is also owned by a hacker, then S ( aka hacker ) won't be able to intercept SSL traffic travelling through it? But if S doesn't have SSL enabled, then hacker will be able to intercept SSL traffic? That doesn't make sense!

c)

Message security focuses on ensuring the integrity and privacy of individ- ual messages, without regard for the network. Through mechanisms such as encryption and signing via public and private keys, the message will be protected even if sent over an unprotected transport (such as plain HTTP).

This doesn't make sense, since transport-level security also can use encryption and certificates, so why would using private/public keys at message-level be more secure than using them at transport-level? Namelly, if intermediary is able to intercept SSL traffic, why wouldn't it also be able to intercept messages secured via message-level private/public keys?

thank you

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I agree. The trust problem is the same for both cases. –  Alex Brown Nov 24 '10 at 19:51
    
What do you mean by "for both cases"? –  user437291 Nov 24 '10 at 20:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think I see what he's getting at. Say like this:

Web client ---> Presentation web server ---> web service call to database

In this case you're depending on the middle server encrypting the data again before it gets to the database. If the message was encrypted instead, only the back end would know how to read it, so the middle doesn't matter.

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Do you agree that if author was actually implying what I thought he was implying, that his arguments would be off? –  user437291 Nov 24 '10 at 20:07
1  
Yes I would. Transport level security does not require the network components in between to be involved in the security. The whole reason for using it is you don't trust them to be secure. –  JOTN Nov 24 '10 at 20:20
    
much appreciated –  user437291 Nov 24 '10 at 20:38
    
I apologize for bothering you, but it appears msdn also claims that transport level security only secures messages from point-to-point, while message level security offers end-to-end security. Is it possible that your assumption is wrong? –  user437291 Nov 24 '10 at 23:41
    
20 pages further into the book author of the quote I've posted in my edit explained what he actually meant by it, and it is as you've said it. I apologize for any inconveniences, but I was really sure author meant something else, since msdn docs made similar claims. Anyways, thank you for your help –  user437291 Nov 26 '10 at 19:52

Consider the case of SSL interception.

Generally, if you have an SSL encrypted connection to a server, you can trust that you "really are* connected to that server, and that the server's owners have identified themselves unambiguously to a mutually trusted third party, like Verisign, Entrust, or Thawte (by presenting credentials identifying their name, address, contact information, ability to do business, etc., and receiving a certificate countersigned by the third party's signature). Using SSL, this certificate is an assurance to the end user that traffic between the user's browser (client) and the server's SSL endpoint (which may not be the server itself, but some switch, router, or load-balancer where the SSL certificate is installed) is secure. Anyone intercepting that traffic gets gobbledygook and if they tamper with it in any way, then the traffic is rejected by the server.

But SSL interception is becoming common in many companies. With SSL interception, you "ask" for an HTTPS connection to (for example) www.google.com, the company's switch/router/proxy hands you a valid certificate naming www.google.com as the endpoint (so your browser doesn't complain about a name mismatch), but instead of being countersigned by a mutually trusted third party, it is countersigned by their own certificate authority (operating somewhere in the company), which also happens to be trusted by your browser (since it's in your trusted root CA list which the company has control over).

The company's proxy then establishes a separate SSL-encrypted connection to your target site (in this example, www.google.com), but the proxy/switch/router in the middle is now capable of logging all of your traffic.

You still see a lock icon in your browser, since the traffic is encrypted up to your company's inner SSL endpoint using their own certificate, and the traffic is re-encrypted from that endpoint to your final destination using the destination's SSL certificate, but the man in the middle (the proxy/router/switch) can now log, redirect, or even tamper with all of your traffic.

Message-level encryption would guarantee that the message remains encrypted, even during these intermediate "hops" where the traffic itself is decrypted.

Load-balancing is another good example, because the SSL certificate is generally installed on the load balancer, which represents the SSL endpoint. The load balancer is then responsible for deciding which physical machine to send the now-decrypted traffic to for processing. Your messages may go through several "hops" like this before it finally reaches the service endpoint that can understand and process the message.

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