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I have a read function in a module.

If I perform that function simultaneously I need to timestamp it.

How do I do this?

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please give more detail. where is the timestamp supposed to be recorded? Are you reading from a file? Are you saying that the timestamping has to be simultaneous with the read function, or that you need to timestamp if simultaneous reads occur? –  John Mulder Jan 9 '09 at 5:33
    
what do you mean by timestamping a function? –  hasenj Jan 9 '09 at 6:22
    
what do you mean by simultaneous? –  Jim Carroll Jan 9 '09 at 6:42
    
"Simultaneous" doesn't mean anything. Even if there are multiple threads, only one of them is actually scheduled at a given time. If it's across multiple processes, it's not the "same" function, it's two copies, one in each process. –  S.Lott Jan 9 '09 at 11:44

4 Answers 4

I'll offer a slightly different approach:

import time

def timestampit(func):
    def decorate(*args, **kwargs):
        decorate.timestamp = time.time()
        return func(*args, **kwargs)
    return decorate

@timestampit
def hello():
    print 'hello'


hello()
print hello.timestamp

time.sleep(1)

hello()
print hello.timestamp

The differences from Swaroop's example are:

  1. I'm using time.time() and not datetime.now() for a timestamp, because it's more suitable for performance testing
  2. I'm attaching the timestamp as an attribute of the decorated function. This way you may invoke and keep it whenever you want.
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He is asking about simultaneous calls of the function. With this approach the slightly later call will overwrite the timestamp from the call before. –  unbeknown Jan 9 '09 at 8:31
    
Yes, but this is an intentional example with the same function. He can decorate two different functions. And frankly what does simultaneous mean ?? –  Eli Bendersky Jan 9 '09 at 14:38
    
Right, I'm pretty sure he did't talk about threads or other parallelization techniques. But in absence of an other explanation of what "simultaneous" might mean, I thought, I would mention it here. –  unbeknown Jan 9 '09 at 17:18

#!/usr/bin/env python

import datetime

def timestampit(func):
    def decorate(*args, **kwargs):
        print datetime.datetime.now()
        return func(*args, **kwargs)
    return decorate

@timestampit
def hello():
    print 'hello'

hello()

# Output:
# $ python test.py 
# 2009-01-09 11:50:48.704584
# hello
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I am a beginner in Python.Please dont mind of my question. Can you please explain what is happening ,Swaroop??? –  user46646 Jan 9 '09 at 6:27
    
@rejinacm, We are using decorators, you can read about it in this introduction. –  Swaroop C H Jan 9 '09 at 6:29

If you're interested, there's a wealth of information about decorators on the python wiki.

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Some example code by Terik Ziade

(more polished version, which uses timeit module, can be found in his recent book Expert Python Programming)

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