Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to unit test the following piece of code:

@Override
public void update() {
  if (isStopped() || isPaused()) {
    return;
  }
  // ...
}

This method is from an audio stream. It needs to be called regularly so the stream reads new data. If the playback is stopped or paused the stream should not advance so I return immediately. However, I can't find a way to write a test for this code.

share|improve this question
    
We need to see more code as that method changes no visible state - so what instance variables are there and what do isStopped and isPaused do? –  Mark Nov 24 '10 at 22:29
1  
Validate that whatever the // ... does, has not happened? –  Paul Creasey Nov 24 '10 at 22:32
    
Total unit test coverage is hard to achieve, and probably not worth the effort. Unless there are some funky interactions going on, this looks like a case that you could put in the "too hard" basket. –  Stephen C Nov 25 '10 at 1:01

3 Answers 3

Perhaps return a boolean indicating what happened?

share|improve this answer

In this case, you should test that there are no side effects to the method call. For example, if the ... has a method call on a collaborator, you should mock that collaborator and then verify that no methods on the collaborator were called.

You might also be able to test that properties on the object on which update is called are not changed, depending on what is actually in your class....

share|improve this answer

Here's a complicated approach:

One idea would be to implement the Observer pattern, define a listener interface that can subscribe to events from your tested class. the event would in this case be sent after the if block:

public interface EventListener{
    // EventDetails would be an object that encapsulates
    // event type and extra data
    void process(EventDetails type); 
}


private void dispatchEvent(EventType type){
    for(EventListener listener : this.listeners){
        listener.process(new EventDetails(type
           /* you'll want to add more data than that here */));
    }
}


@Override
public void update() {
  if (isStopped() || isPaused()) {
    return;
  }
  dispatchEvent(EventType.UPDATE);
  // ...
}

And in the test class:

yourClass.addEventListener(new EventListener(){
    public void process(EventDetails details){
        if(EventType.UPDATE.equals(details.getEventType())){
            fail("Received update event");
        }
    }
});
// set to stopped or paused
yourClass.update();
// if we got here, test has succeeded

Of course this approach is a huge intrusion into the way things are working now, and it only makes sense if your application could actually use an event notification system (the unit testing capability being but a nice side effect).


Or something completely different:

in the unit test, use a subclass that overrides whatever method is called after the if block.

So let's say the original code is this:

@Override
public void update() {
  if (isStopped() || isPaused()) {
    return;
  }
  doUpdate();
}

then the subclass would override the doUpdate() method:

protected void doUpdate(){
    fail("I shouldn't be here");
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.