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I'm learning C++. I'm trying to do an exercise where I define several implementations of a pure virtual class with a single function. I'm having trouble linking the class that uses these implementations.

==> BasicMath.h <==
#ifndef BASIC_MATH_H
#define BASIC_MATH_H

#include<string>
#include<vector>    

class BasicMath { };


#endif // BASIC_MATH_H

==> Operation.h <==

#ifndef OPERATION
#define OPERATION

#include<string>
#include<vector>    

class Operation {
 public:
  virtual void perform(std::vector<std::string> vec) = 0;
};


#endif // OPERATION

==> Sum.h <==
#ifndef SUM_H
#define SUM_H

#include "Operation.h"

class Sum: public Operation {
 public:
  void perform(std::vector<std::string> vec);
};

#endif // SUM_H

==> BasicMath.cpp <==
#ifndef BASIC_MATH_C
#define BASIC_MATH_C

#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include "BasicMath.h"
#include "Sum.h"

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
  Sum op;
}

#endif // BASIC_MATH_C

==> Sum.cpp <==
#ifndef SUM_C
#define SUM_C

#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include "Sum.h"

void Sum::perform(std::vector<std::string> vec) {
    using namespace std;
    int total = 0;
    cout << "Total: " << total << "\n";
};

#endif // SUM_C

Compilation:

$ g++ -c Sum.cpp
$ g++ -o BasicMath BasicMath.cpp
/tmp/cc1VXjNl.o:BasicMath.cpp:(.text$_ZN3SumC1Ev[Sum::Sum()]+0x16): undefined reference to `vtable for Sum'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

I'm 95% sure I'm doing at least one foolish thing here - but my brain is refusing to tell me what.

I have see this question but have not managed to fix my issue.

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1  
Side note: You definitely want to pass an std::vector by reference, not by value. –  EboMike Nov 24 '10 at 23:23
    
Side note 2: Classes with virtual functions should have a virtual destructor. –  EboMike Nov 24 '10 at 23:24
    
yep - will add these now I have the skeleton in place. –  Ben Nov 24 '10 at 23:39
    
I have added the g++ tag, as your problem is in how to get the compiler (more precisely linker) to link object files, and that is compiler dependent. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 25 '10 at 0:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're not including the Sum.o object file on your compile&link line (second g++ use).

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ok that was excruciatingly easy. Thanks Noah. Take the other points about pass by ref etc. I'll work on that next now I'm past this error. g++ manual goes on the reading list! –  Ben Nov 24 '10 at 23:38

You're just compiling BasicMath.cpp without Sum.cpp - your linker has no idea about Sum.cpp. You'll need to compile them both together, i.e. Sum.cpp BasicMath.cpp in one go, or you can compile the .cpp files independently and then create the executable by calling g++ with both .o files.

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Understood EboMike. Thanks. –  Ben Nov 24 '10 at 23:38

A couple of people have already pointed out the solution to the problem you've seen.

I'll add something rather different. You only need header guards in your headers. You've included them in your source files as well, where they really don't make sense. For example, I've commented out the lines you really don't need (or even want) in sum.cpp:

//#ifndef SUM_C
//#define SUM_C
//
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include "Sum.h"

void Sum::perform(std::vector<std::string> vec) {
    using namespace std;
    int total = 0;
    cout << "Total: " << total << "\n";
};

//#endif // SUM_C

Just FWIW, instead of perform, I'd use operator():

class Operation {
 public:
  virtual void operator()(std::vector<std::string> vec) = 0;
};

and (obviously) that's also what you'd overload for Sum. To use it, instead of something like:

Sum op;
op.perform();

You'd use something like:

Sum op;
op();

This is particularly convenient when you combine your class with others (e.g., those in the standard library) that invoke operations like functions, whether they're really functions, or "functors" (classes like this, that overload operator() so syntactically they can be used almost like functions).

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Hi Jerry - I added the guards in my source after reviewing some of the ACE code, which had this style cs.wustl.edu/~schmidt/ACE.html. Perhaps this is required for some frameworks or is just now defunct? –  Ben Dec 2 '10 at 10:09

I normally encounter this error when I accidentally forget the =0 at the end of one of my functions in a pure virtual class.

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That has nothing to do with it. =0 means that your class will be abstract. I guess the problem is that you forgot to write a function body. –  EboMike Nov 25 '10 at 0:05

I Just encountered the same problem, but my problem was that I had not written the destructor codein my .cpp file.

class.h:

    class MyClass {
    public:
        MyClass();
        virtual ~MyClass();
    };

class.cpp:

    MyClass::MyClass() {
    }

It just gave me the vtable error message, and implementing the (empty) destructor solved the problem.

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