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I recently received some job applicant test results in which one person claimed the the solution they gave was more efficient (I won't say which since I don't want to influence the answers). Needless to say, I was sceptical, but I don't know enough about the inner workings of RE compilers to comment intelligently.

The question was: Give a regular expression to recognise numbers from 0 through 99 inclusive.

The answers were:

[0-9]{1,2}
[0-9]?[0-9]
[0-9]|([0-9][0-9])

I'd be interested as to why any of these are faster (or better in any other way). Bonus points for providing evidence rather than conjecture, but I'll still take conjecture if you make it sound convincing enough :-)

share|improve this question
1  
It would depend on the regexp implementation being used. –  Slomojo Nov 24 '10 at 23:51
2  
Not to be too pedantic, but they all match more that 0-99. They also match 00-09 which are possibly NOT values that you want to match. –  dietbuddha Nov 25 '10 at 5:35
    
@dietbuddha, maybe we should offer you the job :-) Good catch. –  paxdiablo Nov 25 '10 at 7:22

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The expression [0-9]{1,2} should be the fastest I would imagine, although it will depend on the specific engine.

My reasoning is:

  • [0-9]{1,2} - this exactly describes what you want to match.
  • [0-9]?[0-9] - this could result in a backtrack if the first match fails.
  • [0-9]|([0-9][0-9]) - this requires the first character to be checked twice if it fails, and the parentheses here are unnecessary and cause an unneeded capture.

Here are the iterations per second I got when testing this in .NET (without RegexOptions.Compiled):

Regex                      100% valid input   50% valid input  100% invalid input
"^[0-9]{1,2}$"             749086             800313           870748
"^[0-9]?[0-9]$"            731951             725984           740152
"^(?:[0-9]|([0-9][0-9]))$" 564654             687248           870378

With RegexOptions.Compiled:

Regex                      100% valid input   50% valid input  100% invalid input
"^[0-9]{1,2}$"             1486212            1592535          1831843
"^[0-9]?[0-9]$"            1301557            1448812          1559193
"^(?:[0-9]|([0-9][0-9]))$" 1131179            1303213          1394146

And as a graph:

alt text

Note: I modified each regular expression to require an exact match rather than performing a search.

share|improve this answer
    
A | should actually not cause a backtrack in such simple cases; this is a common case in pattern matching. –  Lucero Nov 25 '10 at 0:02
1  
Thanks for posting "real-world" results! Did you compile the regex (RegexOptions.Compiled)? –  Lucero Nov 25 '10 at 0:09
    
@Lucero: No, I didn't use RegexOptions.Compiled, but I will rerun the test with that. –  Mark Byers Nov 25 '10 at 0:14
    
Great, +1 for the effort ;-) –  Lucero Nov 25 '10 at 0:16
    
Did you run a warmup of each regex on the compiled version? Because after compilation (to IL), but upon the first invocation, the JIT will likely kick in, which may be the reason why some numbers are slightly lower than uncompiled. –  Lucero Nov 25 '10 at 0:33

At least in theory, identical regexes like these will yield identical automata. A DFA-based matcher is going to match one character at a time and have the different possible branches encoded in its states (as opposed to taking one branch at a time and then backtracking upon failure), so the performance of each will be the same.

All three regexes would be matched by this DFA:

+---+  0-9  +---+  0-9  +---+  *  .---.
| A |  -->  | B |  -->  | C | --> (ERR)
+---+       +---+       +---+     '---'
  |          / \          |
  | *     * /   \ $       | $ 
  V        /     \        V
.---.     /       \     .---.
(ERR) <--'         '--> (ACC)
'---'                   '---'

State A: Start state. Goes to B if it sees a digit, otherwise to an ERROR state.
State B: One digit matched so far. EOL ($) is ACCEPTED. A digit moves to C. Anything else is an ERROR.
State C: Two digits matched. EOL is ACCEPTED, anything else is an ERROR.

That's my language theoretical answer. I can't speak to real world regex engine implementations. I'm ignoring the capturing semantics of the parentheses as I am guessing that's not the point of the question. Automata also don't handle other "non-theoretical" constructs like greediness, lookahead, etc. At least not in their textbook presentation.

share|improve this answer
    
They are not at all identical. While an engine could recognize that the second one expects the same character to follow, it could avoid being too greedy or actually rewrite it to be the same as the first one. But from the pure definition it isn't the same, [0-9][0-9]? however would be the same as the first. –  Lucero Nov 24 '10 at 23:59
    
Nice automata. It doesn't take into account the capture group though. –  Lucero Nov 25 '10 at 0:05
    
@lucero: The 3 regexes specify the same language. Hence, the DFA will be the same. If an engine constructs and traverses an NFA, then perhaps they will be different. –  lijie Nov 25 '10 at 0:08
    
That's my point exactly. While identical in its outcome in this simple case, the greedy matching typically requires backtracking on failed matches, and capturing groups must be captured upon a match of the group. I didn't pretend that this would be done with a DFA. –  Lucero Nov 25 '10 at 0:15

Without knowing the regex engine, one cannot even decide whether those are correct.

For example, a POSIX ERE is longest-leftmost, not leftmost-longest, so it will choose the longest in a series of alternatives, and therefore choose a string matching "ab" against /a|ab/ will match the whole string, "ab". But a normal backtracking NFA the way you most often see would do something else there: it would care about ordering, and so matching the same "ab" string against the same /a|ab/ pattern would in them select just the beginning part, "a".

The next question is the capture group in the same pattern. If they are intentional, they are odd, since you are keeping two-digit numbers but not one-digit numbers. The other patterns do not do that, yet they are said to be identical in behavior. So I am going to assume that they are in error here. Otherwise the capture group’s memory use will of course cost more to squirrel away than it would take not to do so.

The next problem is the lack of any anchors whatsoever. Again, we cannot know if it those are correct, because it is not clear what the input set would look like nor what that particular engine does with unanchored patterns. Most engines will search everywhere in the string, but some of the less programmer-friendly one will “helpfully” add beginning-of-line (BOL) and end-of-line (EOL) anchors there. In more customary engines, where this does not occur, a zip code in the middle of the line would also match, since five digits obviously contains one- and two-digit substrings. Whether you would want ^ and $ anchors, or \b anchors, I can’t guess.

So I have to make some guesses here. I’m going to leave the anchors off, but I’m going to reorder the third versions branch, because otherwise you can never match a two digit number with a the normal (non-POSIX) kinds of backtracking NFAs most things run.

Before even considering timing, it can really pay to look at what sort of program the regex compiler builds out of those patterns.

% perl -Mre=debug -ce '@pats = ( qr/[0-9]{1,2}/, qr/[0-9]?[0-9]/, qr/[0-9][0-9]|[0-9]/ )'
Compiling REx "[0-9]{1,2}"
Final program:
   1: CURLY {1,2} (14)
   3:   ANYOF[0-9][] (0)
  14: END (0)
stclass ANYOF[0-9][] minlen 1 
Compiling REx "[0-9]?[0-9]"
synthetic stclass "ANYOF[0-9][]".
Final program:
   1: CURLY {0,1} (14)
   3:   ANYOF[0-9][] (0)
  14: ANYOF[0-9][] (25)
  25: END (0)
stclass ANYOF[0-9][] minlen 1 
Compiling REx "[0-9][0-9]|[0-9]"
Final program:
   1: BRANCH (24)
   2:   ANYOF[0-9][] (13)
  13:   ANYOF[0-9][] (36)
  24: BRANCH (FAIL)
  25:   ANYOF[0-9][] (36)
  36: END (0)
minlen 1 
-e syntax OK
Freeing REx: "[0-9]{1,2}"
Freeing REx: "[0-9]?[0-9]"
Freeing REx: "[0-9][0-9]|[0-9]"

It really is a good idea to look at the compiled patterns. It can be even more instructive to observe the compiled pattern being executed. Here we’ll watch both:

% perl -Mre=debug -e '"aabbbababbaaqcccaaaabcacabba" =~ /abc|bca|cab|caab|baac|bab|aaa|bbb/'
Compiling REx "abc|bca|cab|caab|baac|bab|aaa|bbb"
Final program:
   1: TRIEC-EXACT[abc] (25)
      <abc> 
      <bca> 
      <cab> 
      <caab> 
      <baac> 
      <bab> 
      <aaa> 
      <bbb> 
  25: END (0)
stclass AHOCORASICKC-EXACT[abc] minlen 3 
Matching REx "abc|bca|cab|caab|baac|bab|aaa|bbb" against "aabbbababbaaqcccaaaabcacabba"
Matching stclass AHOCORASICKC-EXACT[abc] against "aabbbababbaaqcccaaaabcacabba" (28 chars)
   0 <> <aabbbababb>         | Charid:  1 CP:  61 State:    1, word=0 - legal
   1 <a> <abbbababba>        | Charid:  1 CP:  61 State:    2, word=0 - legal
   2 <aa> <bbbababbaa>       | Charid:  2 CP:  62 State:   11, word=0 - fail
   2 <aa> <bbbababbaa>       | Fail transition to State:    2, word=0 - legal
   3 <aab> <bbababbaaq>      | Charid:  2 CP:  62 State:    3, word=0 - fail
   3 <aab> <bbababbaaq>      | Fail transition to State:    5, word=0 - legal
   4 <aabb> <bababbaaqc>     | Charid:  2 CP:  62 State:   13, word=0 - legal
   5 <aabbb> <ababbaaqcc>    | Charid:  1 CP:  61 State:   14, word=8 - accepting
Matches word #8 at position 2. Trying full pattern...
   2 <aa> <bbbababbaa>       |  1:TRIEC-EXACT[abc](25)
   2 <aa> <bbbababbaa>       |    State:    1 Accepted:    0 Charid:  2 CP:  62 After State:    5
   3 <aab> <bbababbaaq>      |    State:    5 Accepted:    0 Charid:  2 CP:  62 After State:   13
   4 <aabb> <bababbaaqc>     |    State:   13 Accepted:    0 Charid:  2 CP:  62 After State:   14
   5 <aabbb> <ababbaaqcc>    |    State:   14 Accepted:    1 Charid:  8 CP:   0 After State:    0
                                  got 1 possible matches
                                  only one match left: #8 <bbb>
   5 <aabbb> <ababbaaqcc>    | 25:END(0)
Match successful!
Freeing REx: "abc|bca|cab|caab|baac|bab|aaa|bbb"

Here the compiler got really clever on us, and compiled that into an Aho–Corasick trie structure. Obviously this is going to perform quite differently from how a normal backtracking NFA would on the same program.

Anyway, here are the timing for your patterns, or close to them. I added an alternate formulation for number two, and I swapped the ordering of the alternatives in number three.

testing against short_fail
                 Rate     second      first      third second_alt
second      9488823/s         --        -9%       -21%       -29%
first      10475308/s        10%         --       -13%       -22%
third      11998438/s        26%        15%         --       -11%
second_alt 13434377/s        42%        28%        12%         --

testing against long_fail
                 Rate     second      first      third second_alt
second     11221411/s         --        -3%        -5%        -5%
first      11618967/s         4%         --        -1%        -1%
third      11776451/s         5%         1%         --        -0%
second_alt 11786700/s         5%         1%         0%         --
testing against short_pass

                 Rate      first second_alt     second      third
first      11720379/s         --        -4%        -7%        -7%
second_alt 12199048/s         4%         --        -3%        -4%
second     12593191/s         7%         3%         --        -1%
third      12663378/s         8%         4%         1%         --

testing against long_pass
                 Rate      third     second      first second_alt
third      11135053/s         --        -1%        -5%        -8%
second     11221655/s         1%         --        -4%        -7%
first      11716924/s         5%         4%         --        -3%
second_alt 12042240/s         8%         7%         3%         --

That was produce by this program:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use Benchmark qw<cmpthese>;

$short_fail = "a" x   1;
$long_fail  = "a" x 600;

$short_pass = $short_fail . 42;
$long_pass  = $long_fail  . 42;

for my $name (qw< short_fail long_fail short_pass long_pass >) {   
    print "\ntesting against $name\n";
    $_ = $$name;    
    cmpthese 0 => {
        first       => '/[0-9]{1,2}/',
        second      => '/[0-9]?[0-9]/',
        second_alt  => '/[0-9][0-9]?/',
        third       => '/[0-9][0-9]|[0-9]/',
    }    
}

Here are numbers with anchors added:

testing against short_fail
                 Rate      first     second second_alt      third
first      11720380/s         --        -3%        -4%       -11%
second     12058622/s         3%         --        -1%        -9%
second_alt 12180583/s         4%         1%         --        -8%
third      13217006/s        13%        10%         9%         --
testing against long_fail
                 Rate      third      first second_alt     second
third      11378120/s         --        -2%        -4%       -12%
first      11566419/s         2%         --        -2%       -10%
second_alt 11830740/s         4%         2%         --        -8%
second     12860517/s        13%        11%         9%         --
testing against short_pass
                 Rate     second      third second_alt      first
second     11540465/s         --        -5%        -5%        -7%
third      12093336/s         5%         --        -0%        -3%
second_alt 12118504/s         5%         0%         --        -2%
first      12410348/s         8%         3%         2%         --
testing against long_pass
                 Rate      first     second second_alt      third
first      11423466/s         --        -1%        -4%        -7%
second     11545540/s         1%         --        -3%        -7%
second_alt 11870086/s         4%         3%         --        -4%
third      12348377/s         8%         7%         4%         --

And here is the minimally modified program that produced the second set of numbers:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use Benchmark qw<cmpthese>;

$short_fail = 1  . "a";
$long_fail  = 1  . "a" x 600;

$short_pass =  2;
$long_pass  = 42;

for my $name (qw< short_fail long_fail short_pass long_pass >) {
    print "testing against $name\n";
    $_ = $$name;
    cmpthese 0 => {
        first       => '/^(?:[0-9]{1,2})$/',
        second      => '/^(?:[0-9]?[0-9])$/',
        second_alt  => '/^(?:[0-9][0-9]?)$/',
        third       => '/^(?:[0-9][0-9]|[0-9])$/',
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If one has to be faster (will likely depend on the regex engine used), then clearly the first one in my view (which can be a simple Morris-Pratt table DFA in contrast to the other two), as the other two are likely to require backtracking or perform additional work:

[0-9]?[0-9] - for the case with one digit, the engine will be greedy and match the first digit, then fail the second; backtrack and then succeed

[0-9]|([0-9][0-9]) - a capturing group is used here, which slows things down

share|improve this answer

I have no clue about the internals but what about some pseudo benching? :D

Python

import re
import time

regs = ["^[0-9]{1,2}$", "^[0-9]?[0-9]$", "^[0-9]|([0-9][0-9])$"]
numbers = [str(n) for n in range(0, 100)]

result = None

// determine loop overhead
start = time.time()
for e in xrange(0, 10000):
    for n in numbers:
        result = n

loop = time.time() - start


for i in regs:
    r = re.compile(i)
    now = time.time()
    for e in xrange(0, 10000):
        for n in numbers:
            result = r.search(n)

    print (time.time() - now) - loop

Results in Seconds

0.874
0.869
0.809

JavaScript

var regs = ["^[0-9]{1,2}$", "^[0-9]?[0-9]$", "^[0-9]|([0-9][0-9])$"]

var numbers = [];
for(var n = 0; n < 100; n++) {
    numbers.push(''+n);
}


// determine loop overhead
var result = null;
var start = new Date().getTime();
for(var e = 0; e < 10000; e++) {
    for(var n = 0; n < 100; n++) {
        result = numbers[n];
    }
}

// test regex
var loop = new Date().getTime() - start;
for(var i = 0; i < regs.length; i++) {
    var r = new RegExp(regs[i]);
    var now = new Date().getTime();
    for(var e = 0; e < 10000; e++) {
        for(var n = 0; n < 100; n++) {
            result = r.exec(numbers[n]);
        }
    }
    console.log((new Date().getTime() - now) - loop); //using document.write here in Browsers
}

Results in Seconds

Node.js
0.197
0.193
0.226

Opera 11
0.836
0.408
0.372

Firefox 4
2.039
2.491
2.488

So what do we learn? Well Pythons seems to be rather slow, and V8 seems to be quite fast.
But hey benching is always fun!

Update: Java Version

import java.util.regex.Pattern;

public class Test {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        test();
        test();
        test();
        test();
    }

    public static void test() {
        String regs[] = {"^[0-9]{1,2}$", "^[0-9]?[0-9]$", "^[0-9]|([0-9][0-9])$"};
        String numbers[] = new String[100];
        for(int n = 0; n < 100; n++) {
            numbers[n] = Integer.toString(n);
        }

        // determine loop overhead
        String nresult = "";
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        for(int e = 0; e < 10000; e++) {
            for(int n = 0; n < 100; n++) {
                nresult = numbers[n];
            }
        }

        long loop = System.nanoTime() - start;

        boolean result = false;
        for(int i = 0; i < regs.length; i++) {
            Pattern p = Pattern.compile(regs[i]);

            long now = System.nanoTime();
            for(int e = 0; e < 10000; e++) {
                for(int n = 0; n < 100; n++) {
                    result = p.matcher(numbers[i]).matches();
                }
            }
            System.out.println(((System.nanoTime() - now) - loop) / 1000000);
        }
        System.out.println(result);
        System.out.println(nresult);
    }
}

Results in Seconds (times of the 4th run)

0.230
0.262
0.210
share|improve this answer
    
An inherent "problem" with your benchmark is that it doesn't only compare the regex performance, but number-to-string conversions as well, which may be part of python's slowness. Anyhow, Firefox is just... disappointingly slow. –  Lucero Nov 25 '10 at 0:28
1  
@Lucereo if you watch closely I actually pre-cache the converted integers :) numbers = [str(n) for n in range(0, 100)] –  Ivo Wetzel Nov 25 '10 at 0:30
    
Right, sorry, my bad. –  Lucero Nov 25 '10 at 0:35

Those regex are so trivial it shouldn't matter. However, if I had to pick a more efficient implementation, it would be either [0-9]{1,2} or [0-9][0-9]?, which is not in your choices, since there's no backtracking necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Only broken regex implementations perform backtracking for regular expressions (although sometimes it's necessary for the non-regular expressions certain "regex" engines support). –  R.. Dec 21 '10 at 6:56

Just like C and ++i versus i=i+1, a good regex compiler should compile all three of these to exactly the same finite automaton. If it doesn't, I would consider that a bug.

(Exception: If parenthesized subexpression tagging is enabled, the third would obviously compile to include the extra tagging information.)

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