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I am creating a settings editor where plugin writers can define their own user interface for configuring their plugins. I am implementing a feature to hide certain "advanced" elements if a checkbox is unchecked.

The checkbox XAML is trivial:

<CheckBox Name="isAdvanced">_Advanced</CheckBox>

Ideally (more on this later), implementors would just add a flag to advanced controls (which should be hidden when the "advanced" checkbox is unchecked) like so:

<Button library:MyLibraryControl.IsAdvanced="True">My Button</Button>

The problem lies in making the magic of hiding the IsAdvanced="True" elements when isAdvanced.IsChecked == false. I have the desired behaviour with this style on the window element:

<Window.Resources>
    <Style TargetType="Button">
        <Style.Triggers>
            <MultiDataTrigger>
                <MultiDataTrigger.Conditions>
                    <Condition Binding="{Binding (library:MyLibraryControl.IsAdvanced), RelativeSource={RelativeSource Mode=Self}}" Value="True" />
                    <Condition Binding="{Binding IsChecked, ElementName=isAdvanced}" Value="False" />
                </MultiDataTrigger.Conditions>

                <Setter Property="UIElement.Visibility" Value="Collapsed" />
            </MultiDataTrigger>
        </Style.Triggers>
    </Style>
</Window.Resources>

However, this method presents two problems:

  1. It only adds functionality to buttons and nothing else. The IsAdvanced flag can (should be able to) be added to any visual element.
  2. It replaces/overrides the styles which would otherwise be on the button.

Is there some other way to produce the functionality I want? I'm not afraid of working in the code-behind, but an elegant XAML solution is ideal (as this is purely a UI change, aside from saving the state of the checkbox in the user's preferences).


Some other methods of signifying advanced elements have come to mind. These include using a dynamic resource and directly binding:

<Button Visibility="{DynamicResource IsAdvancedVisibility}">My Button</Button>
<Button Visibility="{Binding IsChecked, RelativeSource={...}, ValueConverter={...}}">My Button</Button>

Using a resource dictionary would probably work, but it seems like a really bad solution as UI state doesn't seem like it should belong in a dictionary. Binding manually is quite the mess because the state of the checkbox has to be sent somehow to the element, and aside from hardcoding values I don't see it not becoming a mess.

Both of these alternate solutions tie semantics ("this is an advanced option") to appearance ("advanced options should be collapsed"). Coming from the HTML world, I know this is a very bad thing, and I refuse to submit to these methods unless absolutely necessary.

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3 Answers 3

How about moving this into the ViewModel instead of XAML because this looks like behavior to me.

The behavior you want seems to me - each plugin registers a bunch of properties (mapping to UI Controls) as advanced. There is a global setting to turn on/off advanced properties. When this happens, update all plugins to show/hide their advanced properties

Have plugin writers implement an interface containing a set only property AreAdvancedControlsVisible. Let them take care of hiding/showing the controls in their UI via property change handler. The advanced UI controls can bind to a ShowAdvancedControls flag on the pluginVM, which is toggled on/off from the prop changed handler. The framework can just loop over the available plugins and set this flag whenever the ShowAdvanced checkbox is set.

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This is certainly a viable option, and sounds pretty clean. The problem is that this will probably introduce boilerplate code being sprinkled here and there to propagate the behaviour down to the UI. It does give plugins more control, however. –  strager Nov 25 '10 at 8:28
    
@strager - I am not sure as to what methods constitute the boiler plate code. If the plugins have a set of methods that seem to be duplicating, I'd create a abstract base class for the plugin-writers to use as a starting point. –  Gishu Nov 25 '10 at 14:46
    
Well, you'd need to create an AreAdvancedControlsVisible dependency property (or using INotifyPropertyChanged) and also bind visibility to that property. It's not a lot of boilerplate, but it's sprinkled around. Using an abstract base class may be an option for me; I'll look into it. –  strager Nov 25 '10 at 19:26
    
@strager - once you move the behavior into the ViewModel, I'm not sure you need dependency properties anymore. You could bind to standard .net properties which support INotifyPropertyChanged –  Gishu Nov 26 '10 at 11:11
    
I understand that. You still have to write the property code for every class (or use an abstract base class) and bind each element in a non-semantic way. –  strager Nov 26 '10 at 19:42

There are probably alot of better ways to solve this problem but I tried to work past the two issues you had with your solution. Small sample project with this can be downloaded here.

1.It only adds functionality to buttons and nothing else. The IsAdvanced flag can (should be able to) be added to any visual element.

Adding an Attached Property, that make all children inherit the value, to the top-most container could fix this.

2.It replaces/overrides the styles which would otherwise be on the button.

Bea Stollnitz has a nice blog article about merging Styles here.
It has an extension method for Style called Merge which could be used.

Sounded pretty straight forward but the following problems made the code more complex.
1. The Visual elements doesn't have a style when the Attached Property is inherited. Required Loaded event.
2. A Style can't be modified when it is in use. Required a copy method for the Style.

So, we want this Style to be merged with the active Style for all children in the parent container.

<Style x:Key="IsAdvancedStyle">
    <Style.Triggers>
        <MultiDataTrigger>
            <MultiDataTrigger.Conditions>
                <Condition Binding="{Binding (library:MyLibraryControl.IsAdvanced), RelativeSource={RelativeSource Mode=Self}}" Value="True" />
                <Condition Binding="{Binding IsChecked, ElementName=isAdvanced}" Value="False" />
            </MultiDataTrigger.Conditions>
            <Setter Property="Control.Visibility" Value="Collapsed" />
        </MultiDataTrigger>
    </Style.Triggers>
</Style>

If the root container is a StackPanel we then add this. The style IsAdvancedStyle will then be inherited by all the children and merged with the active Style.

<StackPanel local:StyleChildsBehavior.StyleChilds="{StaticResource IsAdvancedStyle}">

StyleChildsBehavior.cs

public class StyleChildsBehavior
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty StyleChildsProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("StyleChilds",
                                            typeof(Style),
                                            typeof(StyleChildsBehavior),
                                            new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(null,
                                                    FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.Inherits,
                                                    StyleChildsCallback));

    public static void SetStyleChilds(DependencyObject element, Style value)
    {
        element.SetValue(StyleChildsProperty, value);
    }
    public static Style GetStyleChilds(DependencyObject element)
    {
        return (Style)element.GetValue(StyleChildsProperty);
    }

    private static void StyleChildsCallback(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (DesignerProperties.GetIsInDesignMode(d) == true)
        {
            return;
        }
        Style isAdvancedStyle = e.NewValue as Style;
        if (isAdvancedStyle != null)
        {
            FrameworkElement element = d as FrameworkElement;
            if (element != null)
            {
                if (element.IsLoaded == false)
                {
                    RoutedEventHandler loadedEventHandler = null;
                    loadedEventHandler = new RoutedEventHandler(delegate
                    {
                        element.Loaded -= loadedEventHandler;
                        MergeStyles(element, isAdvancedStyle);
                    });
                    element.Loaded += loadedEventHandler;
                }
                else
                {
                    MergeStyles(element, isAdvancedStyle);
                }
            }
        }
    }
    private static void MergeStyles(FrameworkElement element, Style isAdvancedStyle)
    {
        if (element != null)
        {
            Style advancedStyle = GetStyleCopy(isAdvancedStyle);
            advancedStyle.Merge(element.Style);
            element.Style = advancedStyle;
        }
    }
    private static Style GetStyleCopy(Style style)
    {
        string savedStyle = XamlWriter.Save(style);
        using (MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream(Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(savedStyle)))
        {
            ParserContext parserContext = new ParserContext();
            parserContext.XmlnsDictionary.Add("library", "clr-namespace:HideAll;assembly=HideAll");
            return XamlReader.Load(memoryStream, parserContext) as Style;
        }
    }
}

After this the IsAdvancedStyle will be merged in all children of the StackPanel and this goes for children that are added in run-time as well.

Modified Merge extension method from the blog link.

public static void Merge(this Style style1, Style style2)
{
    if (style1 == null || style2 == null)
    {
        return;
    }
    if (style1.TargetType.IsAssignableFrom(style2.TargetType))
    {
        style1.TargetType = style2.TargetType;
    }
    if (style2.BasedOn != null)
    {
        Merge(style1, style2.BasedOn);
    }
    foreach (SetterBase currentSetter in style2.Setters)
    {
        style1.Setters.Add(currentSetter);
    }
    foreach (TriggerBase currentTrigger in style2.Triggers)
    {
        style1.Triggers.Add(currentTrigger);
    }
}
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I decided to invert the problem a little bit, and it worked well.

Instead of dealing with styles, I used property binding as suggested by Gishu. However, instead of placing the UI in the VM (where properties would propagate several layers manually), I used an attached property named ShowAdvanced which propagates down via property inheritance.

Creating this property is trivial:

public static readonly DependencyProperty ShowAdvancedProperty;

ShowAdvancedProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached(
    "ShowAdvanced",
    typeof(bool),
    typeof(MyLibraryControl),
    new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(
        false,
        FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.Inherits | FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.OverridesInheritanceBehavior
    )
);

The checkbox sets the ShowAdvanced property above on the entire window. It could set it elsewhere (e.g. on the grid), but putting it on the window makes more sense IMO:

<CheckBox Grid.Column="0"
    IsChecked="{Binding (library:MyLibraryControl.ShowAdvanced), ElementName=settingsWindow}"
    Content="_Advanced" />

Changing the visibility (or whatever other properties desired) depending on the ShowAdvanced property becomes easy:

<Foo.Resources>
    <BooleanToVisibilityConverter x:Key="BooleanToVisibilityConverter" />
</Foo.Resources>

<Button Visibility="{Binding (library:MyLibraryControl.ShowAdvanced), RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}, Converter={StaticResource BooleanToVisibilityConverter}}">I'm Advanced</Button>

Ditching styles allows plugin writers to completely change the layout of their controls if they need to. They can also show advanced controls but keep them disabled if desired. Styles brought up a lot of problems and, as Meleak showed, the workarounds were messy.

My main problem with putting the 'advanced' display logic in the VM is that it is now less likely you can get away with binding multiple views to the same VM while maintaining the flexibility desired. If the 'advanced' logic is in the VM, advanced controls must be shown for all views or no views; you can't show them for one and hide them for another. This, IMO, breaks the principles of having a VM in the first place.

(Thanks to all who posted here; it's been helpful!)

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