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I’m trying to figure out which pattern to follow in a certain situation. I have web app that consists of several main widgets that interact with each other somehow. The widgets follow the module pattern.

To let code speak:

MyApp.Widgets.MainLeftBox = (function(){
    var self = {};

    self.doSomething = function(){
        var certainState = MyApp.Widgets.MainRightBox.getCertainState();
        if (certainState === 1){
            console.log(‘this action happens now’);
        }
        else {
             console.log(‘this action can’t happen because of a certain state in My.App.Widgets.MainRightBox’);
        }
    } 
    return self;
})();

As you can see, I have tight coupling here. As we all know, tight coupling is evil. (Except when you have found the one and only! ;-))

I know a lot of decoupling can be achieved by following a pub-sub / custom event pattern. But that’s better suited for situations were A starts something and B can react upon. But I have a situation where A starts something independently but needs to check a certain state from B to proceed.

As I’m striving for maintainability, I’m looking for a way out of this hell.

What first came to my mind is the mediator pattern.

But still, my code would look like this:

MyApp.Widgets.MainLeftBox = (function(mediator){
    var self = {};

    self.doSomething = function(){
        var certainState = mediator.getCertainState();
        if (certainState === 1){
            console.log(‘this action happens now’);
        }
        else {
             console.log(‘this action can’t happen because of a certain state in mediator’);
        }
    } 
    return self;
})(MyApp.Mediator);

This is a little better, because Widgets don't communicate directly but indirectly through the mediator.

However, I still feel that I'm doing it wrong and there must be a better way to achieve decoupling the widgets from each other.

EDIT

Let me sum things up so far!

In general, I do like the MVC approach of separating the views! However, think of this example more like complex modules. Those doesn't really have to be "boxes" in a visual sense. It's just easier to describe this way.

Another given fact should be, that A starts an action independently and needs to check for some state then. It can't subscribe to B's state change and provide the action or doesn't. It has to be like A starts it independently and then needs to check a certain state. Think of this as some complex operation that B needs be asked for.

So I came up with a mixture of custom events/callback/mediator approach and there are some things that I really like about it.

1.) A module doesn't know about any other module
2.) A module doesn't know about a mediator neither
3.) A module that depends on some external state does only know that it depends on some external state - not more
4.) A module really doesn't care who will provide this certain state
5.) A module can determine if that certain state has been provided or not
6.) The request pipeline is straight. In other words the module is the starter of this operation. it doesn't just subscribe to a state change event (Remember A starts the action and then needs a state from B (or somewhere)

I posted some example code here and also provide a jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/YnFqm/

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.3/jquery.min.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
<div id="widgetA"></div>
<div id="widgetB"></div>
<script type="text/javascript">

var MyApp = {};

(function (MyApp){

    MyApp.WidgetA = function WidgetA(){

        var self = {}, inner = {}, $self = $(self);

        //init stuff
        inner.$widget = $('#widgetA');
        inner.$button = $('<button>Click Me!</button>')
                            .appendTo(inner.$widget)
                            .click(function(){self.doAction();});


        self.doAction = function(){
            //Needs state from WidgetB to proceed

            /* Tight coupling
            if (MyApp.WidgetB.getState() == 'State A'){
                alert('all fine!');
            }
            else{
                alert("can't proceed because of State in Widget B");
            }
            */

            var state;
            $self.trigger('StateNeeded',function(s){state = s});
            if (state == 'State A'){
                alert('all fine!');
            }
            else{
                alert("can't proceed because of State in Widget B");
            }                   
        };

        return self;
    };

    MyApp.WidgetB = function WidgetB(){

        var self = {}, inner = {};

        //init stuff
        inner.$widget = $('#widgetB');
        inner.$button = $('<button>State A</button>')
                            .appendTo(inner.$widget)
                            .click(function(){
                                var buttonState = inner.$button.text();
                                if (buttonState == 'State A'){
                                    inner.$button.text('State B');
                                }
                                else{
                                    inner.$button.text('State A');
                                }
                            });


        self.getState= function(){
            return inner.$button.text();
        };

        return self;
    };

    MyApp.Mediator = (function(){
        var self = {}, widgetA, widgetB;

        widgetA = new MyApp.WidgetA();
        widgetB = new MyApp.WidgetB();

        $(widgetA).bind('StateNeeded', function(event, callback){
            //Mediator askes Widget for state
            var state = widgetB.getState();
            callback(state);
        });

        return self;
    })();

})(MyApp);

</script>
</body>
</html>
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4 Answers 4

You should checkout a great article about large scale JS apps presented by Addy Osmani Patterns For Large-Scale JavaScript Application Architecture and here is a code sample Essential js design patterns

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You can still go with the mediator, but implement your business logic inside it. So, instead of mediator.getCertainState(), have a method mediator.canTakeAction() which knows about the widget(s) to query, and determine if the action is allowed.

This will still end up with a mediator which knows the widgets to query, of course. But since we've offloaded the business logic inside the mediator, I think it is OK for it to know of such things. It may even be the entity that creates these widgets. Alternatively, you can use some sort of registration mechanism where you tell your mediator which widget is used for what role when you create them.


EDIT: Providing an example in the spirit of the given code samples.

MyApp.DeleteCommand=(function(itemsListBox, readOnlyCheckBox) {
  var self = {};

  self.canExecute = function() {
    return (not readOnlyCheckBox.checked()) && (itemsListBox.itemCount() > 0);
  }

  return self;
})(MyApp.Widgets.ItemsList, MyApp.Widgets.ReadOnly);

You can take this two steps further:

  1. Register to state changed events of the source widgets, and update a local cache of the canExecute every time a state change occurs on one of the source widgets.
  2. Also take a reference to a third control (say, to the delete button), and enable or disable the button according to the state.
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Mmm. I'm trying to get my head around it. Not convinced yet... –  Christoph Nov 25 '10 at 18:49
1  
This is not really a mediator pattern. Probably closer to an MVC - where the entity I called the mediator is in fact the controller. The advantage of the approach shows itself when the logic is more complex than checking a single state of a single widget. The widget that needs to take the action queries the logic side for one thing: am I allowed to do blah. The logic behind the state->permission is isolated away in a central location. Of course, I am assuming there are a number of actions and states, and non-trivial mapping between them. –  vhallac Nov 25 '10 at 19:44
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Assuming I'm understanding the nature of a "box" as a box that's visible on your page, then the box should render a view that represents a state of your application or some piece of it -- the underlying state itself should be maintained by an object that's separate from the view that represents that state in the UI.

So, for example, a box view might render a view of a Person, and the box would be black when the person was sleeping and white when the person was awake. If another box on your was responsible for showing what the Person was eating, then you might want that box to only function when the person was awake. (Good examples are hard and I just woke up. Sorry.)

The point here is that you don't want views interrogating each other -- you want them to care about the state of the underlying object (in this case, a Person). If two views care about the same Person, you can just pass the Person as an argument to both views.

Chances are good that your needs are a tad more complicated :) However, if you can think about the problem in terms of independent views of "stateful objects", rather than two views that need to care directly about each other, I think you'll be better off.

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Why can't you use pub-sub model in the following way

  1. LeftBox issues a getStateFromRightBox event.

  2. RightBox has getStateFromRightBox subscriber, which, issues sendStateToLeftBoxAndExecute event with the stateData

  3. LeftBox has a sendStateToLeftBoxAndExecute subscriber which extracts stateData and executes the action conditionally.

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Well, I was thinking in this direction as well. However, I think classical pub/sub isn't working out. What if other components subscribe to this getStateFromRightBox Event as well. They shouldn't be notified just because the LeftBox requests this value right know. But how about that: LeftBox fires a "NeedCertainState" event. Wrapped in this event, there is a callback(certainState). The mediator subscribes to this event, asks the rightbox for the state and runs the callback. –  Christoph Nov 25 '10 at 18:44
    
If you really want to use a mediator, please do so in the fashion you have written. I do not see a problem with that, though I think using a callback is another form of tight coupling. I think instead of using a callback issuing another event from mediator would also work out –  Gaurav Saxena Nov 26 '10 at 4:26
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