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The MSDN Docs says

If the operation raises an exception that your code does not handle, the BackgroundWorker catches the exception and passes it into the RunWorkerCompleted event handler, where it is exposed as the Error property of System.ComponentModel.RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs

But when I tried

_workers[i].DoWork += (s, args) =>
{
    throw new Exception("Error!");
};

I get Exception Unhandled error ... The code doesn't seem to go to RunWorkerCompleted. How are errors supposed to be handled?

UPDATE

I have setup simple handlers

_workers[i].DoWork += (s, args) =>
{
    throw new Exception("Error!");
}
...
_workers[i].RunWorkerCompleted += (s, args) =>
{
    if (args.Error != null) {
        string dummy = args.Error.Message;
    }
    ...
};

The code never leaves DoWork

share|improve this question
    
Do you have a RunWorkerCompleted handler? –  Mitch Wheat Nov 25 '10 at 9:25
    
@Mitch Wheat, yes –  Jiew Meng Nov 25 '10 at 9:37
2  
Did you try the code without debugger? –  Stefan P. Nov 25 '10 at 9:55
    
Just did it, the code did goto the RunWorkComplete handler, except that it seems to keep "looping" there? See screenr.com/eCF. Since I cant use VS Debug, I dont really know why it keeps looping ... I just added 1 task –  Jiew Meng Nov 25 '10 at 10:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If an exception is thrown and passes through user frames but is then not caught by user code, it is considered "user-unhandled".

So I think there are 3 possibilities:

  • This is a first-chance exception - so if you press F5, the exception will propagate as normal.
  • Click "edit code" in the Exception Assistant. Then do some Edit and Continue to solve the problem.
  • Go to Debug->Exceptions and de-select the "user-unhandled" column.
share|improve this answer

If you are running through the debugger, Visual Studio will stop on exceptions in the BackgroundWorker.DoWork event handler rather than silently passing the exception to the RunWorkerCompleted event which is what happens when not in the debugger.

1) You can just hit F5 and continue execution to follow the exception (as RoadWarrior mentioned)

2) If that is too annoying, for DoWork don't use delegates/lambdas but use named methods and decorate with [DebuggerStepThrough] Attribute. This will let the debugger ignore that method and not stop on exception so you can view the "normal" behavior of the Backgroundworker.

See: Visual Studio 2008 Debugging - Skipping code

share|improve this answer

I've done exception handling in BackgroundWorker yesterday. I didn't add any throw in Worker's DoWork handler. If exception happens, you will be able to get it in RunWorkerCompleted without throwing it. Just don't forget to cancel you Worker if exception occurs.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought when u throw, execution immediately ends? so I cannot set Cancel = true to my worker? –  Jiew Meng Nov 25 '10 at 10:55
    
Well, you can set. –  26071986 Nov 25 '10 at 11:50
    
I will get unreachable code detected imgur.com/yVx3q.jpg –  Jiew Meng Nov 26 '10 at 6:04

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