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Running the following code :

use strict;
use warnings;
use Benchmark;

my $defaultArray = [1,2,3,4];
sub VARIABLE {
  my $arrayref =  @_ ? $_[0] : $defaultArray;
  return $arrayref->[0].$arrayref->[1].$arrayref->[2].$arrayref->[3];
}

Benchmark::cmpthese(
  -10,
  {
    VARIABLE_DEFAULT => sub { VARIABLE() },
    VARIABLE_NODEFAULT => sub { VARIABLE([4,3,2,1]) },
  }
);

I get the following Benchmark results :

                            Rate VARIABLE_NODEFAULT   VARIABLE_DEFAULT
VARIABLE_NODEFAULT  313631/s                 --               -74%
VARIABLE_DEFAULT   1210501/s               286%                 --

Why is the NODEFAULT version so much slower than the DEFAULT one ?

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1  
Different topic, but don't forget that you can do this: join '', @$arrayref. –  FMc Nov 25 '10 at 11:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's that much slower because you're creating a new anonymous array ref every time you call it. Change the code to this:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Benchmark;

my $defaultArray = [1,2,3,4];
sub VARIABLE {
  my $arrayref =  @_ ? $_[0] : $defaultArray;
  return $arrayref->[0].$arrayref->[1].$arrayref->[2].$arrayref->[3];
}

Benchmark::cmpthese(
  -10,
  {
    VARIABLE_DEFAULT => sub { VARIABLE() },
    VARIABLE_NODEFAULT => sub { VARIABLE($defaultArray) },
  }
);

And your benchmark ends up much nicer:

                        Rate VARIABLE_NODEFAULT   VARIABLE_DEFAULT
VARIABLE_NODEFAULT 1065824/s                 --                -2%
VARIABLE_DEFAULT   1085082/s                 2%                 --
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3  
Damn. You were 11 seconds faster. ;) –  musiKk Nov 25 '10 at 9:58
    
Yap, found it :) –  OMG_peanuts Nov 25 '10 at 9:59

I'd say because DEFAULT uses one and the same array for every call while the NODEFAULT has to allocate and free space for the array for every call. Compare with the following:

Benchmark::cmpthese(
  -10,
  {
    VARIABLE_DEFAULT => sub { VARIABLE() },
    VARIABLE_NODEFAULT => sub { VARIABLE($defaultArray) },
  }
);
                        Rate VARIABLE_NODEFAULT   VARIABLE_DEFAULT
VARIABLE_NODEFAULT 1619427/s                 --                -4%
VARIABLE_DEFAULT   1689428/s                 4%                 --
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1  
Yup :) I'm closing the question, but you both deserve a + –  OMG_peanuts Nov 25 '10 at 10:00
3  
@OMG_peanuts: "Question has been answered" is not considered a valid reason to close a question around here, so don't expect to get the other 4 votes-to-close that are needed to make that happen. Instead, you should "accept" one of the answers by clicking the green checkmark beside it. –  Dave Sherohman Nov 25 '10 at 10:41
1  
@Dave Sherohman : Yes, you are right. –  OMG_peanuts Nov 25 '10 at 13:28

Got it. This is not the use of a parameter instead of an outer variable, but the test himself : VARIABLE_NODEFAULT => sub { VARIABLE([4,3,2,1]) } In this line, we create an array. Not in this one : VARIABLE_DEFAULT => sub { VARIABLE() },.

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