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I have a date in string format as 25 November 2010 and i am trying to fetch the Milliseconds of that date, for that i have done the below code:

strDateSelcted = "25 November 2010" // Actually i am receiving date in this format
SimpleDateFormat curFormater = new SimpleDateFormat("dd MMM yyyy"); 
 try {
    Date dateObj = curFormater.parse(strDateSelcted);

        insertEventtoCalendar(dateObj.getTime());   // Actually insert an event onto the native calendar

  } catch (ParseException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
 } 

But, when i try to run the application,it creates an event a day before the date inserted, i.e. For 25 November 2010 it inserts event on 24 November 2010 and For 27 November 2010 it inserts event on 26 November 2010, and same.

So where i am making a mistake???? pls show me way to do right

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I didn't get you ,you are trying to fetch millis from 25 November 2010 ? –  Jigar Joshi Nov 25 '10 at 10:07
    
I'm not sure if this is useful for you but I think that in SimpleDateFormat, MMM gives the month like that : Nov and not November... –  Sephy Nov 25 '10 at 10:11
    
@org.life.java ya you got exactly, i want to get milliseconds of particular date (here, i am having a date in String variable) –  Paresh Mayani Nov 25 '10 at 10:24
    
@Sephy thanx, i corrected MMM with MMMM –  Paresh Mayani Nov 25 '10 at 10:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To set the timezone used by the date formatter: call the setTimeZone method e.g.

curFormater.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));
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For one, your date pattern is wrong, use dd MMMM yyyy. MMM parses & returns Nov (not November).

Also, since there is no millisecond provided in your date string, the millisecond will be set to 0.

Seeing that Jon Skeet updated me with the question, it might be timezone issue (as he mentioned). Sorry for the misunderstanding.

Test code:

/**
 * 
 */

import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Date;

/**
 * @author The Elite Gentleman
 *
 */
public class Test {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        try {
            String date = "25 November 2010";
            SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd MMMM yyyy");
            Date d = sdf.parse(date);
            System.out.println(d.getTime());
        } catch (ParseException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Value: 1290636000000

share|improve this answer
    
By "milliseconds of that date" I believe the OP means "milliseconds since January 1st 1970 UTC" in the normal way for java.util.Date. –  Jon Skeet Nov 25 '10 at 10:23
    
Oh, sorry, misunderstood.....Thanks Jon. –  Buhake Sindi Nov 25 '10 at 10:24
    
@Elite thanx for the support, i have correct MMM to MMMM,and also tried your way of Calendar, but now i am getting Milliseconds as 0 (zero) –  Paresh Mayani Nov 25 '10 at 10:25
    
@PM - Paresh Mayani In above code try c.getTimeInMillis() ; –  Jigar Joshi Nov 25 '10 at 10:27
    
@org.life.java same result as 1290277800000 for 21 November 2010, but insertion of event is made on 20 November 2010 –  Paresh Mayani Nov 25 '10 at 10:32

It's almost certainly a time zone issue. Check which time zone your SimpleDateFormat is using, and the one your phone is using to display the event.

For diagnostic purposes I suggest you log the result of dateObj.getTime() and you can check exactly what that means on a desktop machine.

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i have tried to Log it, it has returned 1290277800000 for 21 November 2010 –  Paresh Mayani Nov 25 '10 at 10:15
    
1290277800000 represents the instance in time that is Sat, 20 Nov 2010 18:30:00 GMT. So it's a time zone issue as Jon says. Part of the problem is that you're trying to represent a date, but you're storing an instance in time which is represented as GMT in the database (and truncated accordingly). –  Andrzej Doyle Nov 25 '10 at 10:19
    
@PM: That's Saturday Nov 20 18:30:00 UTC. Are you in a time zone which is 5 1/2 hours ahead of UTC, by any chance? :) –  Jon Skeet Nov 25 '10 at 10:20
    
@Jon ya Currently i am testing an application with India TimeZone (5:30) hours –  Paresh Mayani Nov 25 '10 at 10:27
    
@Jon How can i come out from the above situation, is there any way ?? because application can be used from any country so please show me a correct way –  Paresh Mayani Nov 25 '10 at 10:35

Use Locale.getDefault() when Your using SimpleDateFormat.I hope it may solve your problem.

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