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Many compilers seem to be keeping only 0 or 1 in bool values, but I'm not sure this will always work:

int a = 2
bool b = a;
int c = 3 + b; // 4 or 5?
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1  
For the C++ part, see [Can I assume (bool)true == (int)1 for any C++ compiler ? ](stackoverflow.com/questions/2725044/…). For C, see [Is bool a native C type? ](stackoverflow.com/questions/1608318/is-bool-a-native-c-type). –  Matthew Flaschen Nov 25 '10 at 11:20
1  
I'm more interested in the question worded as "Is a boolean expression always guaranteed to evaluate to 0 or 1?", to which the answer is unambiguously yes –  bobobobo Apr 29 '12 at 17:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Yes:

In C++ (§4.5/4):

An rvalue of type bool can be converted to an rvalue of type int, with false becoming zero and true becoming one.

In C, when a value is converted to _Bool, it becomes 0 or 1 (§6.3.1.2/1):

When any scalar value is converted to _Bool, the result is 0 if the value compares equal to 0; otherwise, the result is 1.

When converting to int, it's pretty straight-forward. int can hold 0 and 1, so there's no change in value (§6.3.1.3).

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I didn't know it worked this way in c, thanks. –  Roman A. Taycher Jun 2 '11 at 5:40
2  
Note that for C, it depends on the type _Bool. If you instead have typedef enum { false, true } bool; it does not work this way. –  Chris Dodd Apr 23 '13 at 18:22

Is C/C++ .......

There's no language named C/C++.

bool type always guaranteed to be 0 or 1 when typecast'ed to int?

In C++ yes because section $4.5/4 says

An rvalue of type bool can be converted to an rvalue of type int, with false becoming zero and true becoming one.

.

int c = 3 + b; // 4 or 5?

The value of c will be 4

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2  
except in C, C doesn't even have a bool type :) –  hhafez Nov 25 '10 at 10:57
2  
@hhafez : In C, until C99, there was no bool datatype. Kindly lift your downvote. –  Prasoon Saurav Nov 25 '10 at 11:03
4  
C99 defined a new type _Bool and a typedef bool in the header <stdbool.h>. If you do not #include <stdbool.h>, your programs cannot use bool, but they can use _Bool. –  pmg Nov 25 '10 at 11:27
15  
+1 for pointing out there is no language called C/C++. –  MAK Nov 25 '10 at 12:45

Well, not always...

const int n = 100;
bool b[n];
for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
{
    int x = b[i];
    if (x & ~1)
    {
        std::cout << x << ' ';
    }
}

Output on my system:

28 255 34 148 92 192 119 46 165 192 119 232 26 195 119 44 255 34 96 157 192 119
8 47 78 192 119 41 78 192 119 8 250 64 2 194 205 146 124 192 73 64 4 255 34 56 2
55 34 224 255 34 148 92 192 119 80 40 190 119 255 255 255 255 41 78 192 119 66 7
8 192 119 192 73 64 240 255 34 25 74 64 192 73 64

The reason for this apparently weird output is laid out in the standard, 3.9.1 §6:

Values of type bool are either true or false. Using a bool value in ways described by this International Standard as "undefined", such as by examining the value of an uninitialized automatic object, might cause it to behave as if it is neither true nor false.

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1  
That's not undefined behavior but an uninitialized array b. –  Sebastian Nov 25 '10 at 11:28
2  
@Sebastian: So uninitialized variables have defined behaviour? –  CiscoIPPhone Nov 25 '10 at 11:40
2  
no not really, the array is just a chunk of uninited memory it can have anything in it, if you had done bool b[n] = {0} then that's a different story. However your quote from the standard is informative so + 1 for pointing out the exception –  hhafez Nov 25 '10 at 11:58
2  
@Sebastian: Trying to access an uninitialized variable is UB. @FredOverflow: Did you? I didn't expect anything, it's UB after all. Do you really think there should be a conversion step each time a boolean value is accessed? There is no defined way to store anything but true or false to a boolean variable. –  eq- Nov 25 '10 at 12:08
4  
@Sebastian: You are simply wrong. Other things, including terminating the program or system("rm -rf /"); are allowed to happen if you access the value of uninitialized variables. –  R.. Nov 25 '10 at 14:55

There is no bool type in C pre C99 (Such as C90), however the bool type in C99/C++ is always guaranteed to be 0 or 1.

In C, all boolean operation are guaranteed to return either 0 or 1, whether the bool type is defined or not.

So a && b or !a or a || b will always return 0 or 1 in C or C++ regardless of the type of a and b.

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4  
C does have bool. Technically, the type is _Bool, and bool is a macro, but that usually doesn't matter unless you're using a conflicting library. –  Matthew Flaschen Nov 25 '10 at 10:59
    
Which version of the C standard introduced bool in C? I have never seen it –  hhafez Nov 25 '10 at 11:01
    
@hha: It was C99. –  FredOverflow Nov 25 '10 at 11:03
    
ok thanks fixing the answer –  hhafez Nov 25 '10 at 11:05
    
@hhafez: Standardized boolean type (_Bool) in C is older than languages like C#. Not too much experience with C, after all? –  eq- Nov 25 '10 at 11:07

One more example when you are out of the safe boat:

  bool b = false;
  *(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&b)) = 0xFF;
  int from_bool = b;
  cout << from_bool << " is " << (b ? "true" : "false");

Output (g++ (GCC) 4.4.7):

  255 is true

To be added to the FredOverflow's example.

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