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I am looking for basic examples/tutorials on:

  1. How to write/compile libraries in C++ (.so files for Linux, .dll files for Windows).

  2. How to import and use those libraries in other code.

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worth a look - also covers static vs dynamic libraries : learncpp.com/cpp-tutorial/a1-static-and-dynamic-libraries –  Graham Griffiths Aug 20 '13 at 13:14
    
also this for code to dynamically load a shared library (with dlopen) : stackoverflow.com/questions/496664/… –  Graham Griffiths Aug 20 '13 at 13:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The code

r.cc :

#include "t.h"

int main()
{
    f();
    return 0;
}

t.h :

void f();

t.cc :

#include<iostream>
#include "t.h"    

void f()
{
    std::cout << "OH HAI.  I'M F." << std::endl;
}

But how, how, how?!

~$ g++ -fpic -c t.cc          # get t.o
~$ g++ -shared -o t.so t.o    # get t.so
~$ export LD_LIBRARY_PATH="." # make sure t.so is found when dynamically linked
~$ g++ r.cc t.so              # get an executable

The export step is not needed if you install the shared library somewhere along the global library path.

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This is a terrible explanation. It doesn' work on Windows, doesn't even touch what Windows adds to this, and throws away everything that was in LD_LIBRARY_PATH... –  rubenvb Aug 20 '13 at 13:16
    
@rubenvb It does work on windows. You need to install cygwin. –  Maxim Egorushkin Aug 20 '13 at 13:30
    
Instead of LD_LIBRARY_PATH use g++ -Wl,-rpath,\$ORIGIN r.cc t.so. –  Maxim Egorushkin Aug 20 '13 at 13:31
    
@Maxim Cygwin != Windows. And Cygwin needs dllexport nonetheless. –  rubenvb Aug 20 '13 at 13:38
    
@rubenvb Let's not play with words. You said It doesn' work on Windows but it does if you install cygwin. Second, you don't need to declare functions and variables as exported with cygwin because it automatically exports all symbols with external linkage (like Linux/UNIX linkers do), see sourceware.org/binutils/docs/ld/WIN32.html –  Maxim Egorushkin Aug 20 '13 at 14:38

Two samples I got off Google:

A Windows DLL

A Shared Library

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