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I'm trying to get an if statement to work in Bash (using Ubuntu):

#!/bin/bash

s1="hi"
s2="hi"

if ["$s1" == "$s2"]
then
  echo match
fi

I've tried various forms of the if statement, using [["$s1" == "$s2"]], with and without quotes, using =, == and -eq, but I still get the following error:

[hi: command not found

I've looked at various sites and tutorials and copied those, but it doesn't work - what am I doing wrong?

Eventually, I want to say if $s1 contains $s2, so how can I do that?

I did just work out the spaces bit.. :/ How do I say contains?

I tried

if [[ "$s1" == "*$s2*" ]]

but it didn't work.

share|improve this question
2  
The answer to your second question ($s1 contains $s2) is here stackoverflow.com/questions/229551/string-contains-in-bash – khachik Nov 25 '10 at 13:48
    
No it isn't - I had it in there originally! – Mr Shoubs Nov 25 '10 at 13:51
    
Oh sorry, I see that now. My bad. Apologies. – marcog Nov 25 '10 at 13:52
    
@marcog, np. answer accepted (as you edited it) :) – Mr Shoubs Nov 25 '10 at 13:54
    
+1 good question... this one was bugging me for a while too :) – code_fodder Oct 17 '13 at 8:20

10 Answers 10

up vote 187 down vote accepted

For string comparison, use:

if [ "$s1" == "$s2" ]

For the a contains b, use:

if [[ $s1 == *"$s2"* ]]
share|improve this answer
11  
For contains, [[ $s1 == *"$s2"* ]] is better because special characters (like "*") in s2 will be matched literally rather than as wildcards. – Gordon Davisson Nov 25 '10 at 17:19
    
@Gordon Edited that in, thanks. – marcog Nov 26 '10 at 11:19
2  
stackoverflow.com/a/229606/376454 I had to use this answer to compare a variable to a fixed string. – Wok Feb 13 '14 at 13:06
1  
The picky guys on IRC are telling me you should use if [[ "$s1" == "$s2" ]] or case. – lpapp Oct 20 '14 at 17:24

You need spaces:

if [ "$s1" == "$s2" ]
share|improve this answer
5  
Just wanted to say to make sure to leave a space between the beginning and ending square brackets and the "$s1" == "$s2" statement or it will not work. Also, this works too: if test "$s1" = "$s2" – racl101 Apr 20 '12 at 3:37

You should be careful to leave a space between the sign of '[' and double quotes where the variable contains this:

if [_"$s1"=="$s2"_]; then
   echo match
fi

Note that the sign "_" represents the blanc space you need to leave between the double quotes and brackets.

share|improve this answer
1  
Many thanks for pointing out the necessary space. Solved my problem. Just started bash today, seems to be a lot of times spaces can cause an error, i.e declaring variables etc. – The Humble Rat Apr 24 '14 at 12:32
    
Plus one for mentioning space. – Pinaki Mukherjee Jul 24 '15 at 20:23
    
This misses the fact that you also need whitespace on both sides of ==. – tripleee Feb 6 at 10:44

I suggest this one:

if [ "$a" = "$b" ]

Notice the white space between the openning/closing brackets and the variables and also the white spaces wrapping the '=' sign.

Also, be careful of your script header. It's not the same thing whether you use

#!/bin/bash

or

#!/bin/sh

Here's the source.

share|improve this answer
$ if [ "$s1" == "$s2" ]; then echo match; fi
match
$ test "s1" = "s2" ;echo match
match
$
share|improve this answer
    
The double equals sign is tolerated in Bash, but not in some other dialects. For portability, the single equals sign should be preferred, and if you target Bash only, the double brackets [[ extension would be superior for versatility, robustness, and convenience. – tripleee Feb 6 at 10:56

I don't have access to a linux box right now, but [ is actually a program (and a bash builtin), so I think you have to put a space between [ and the first parameter.

Also note that string equality operator seems to be a single =

share|improve this answer
#!/bin/bash

s1="hi"
s2="hi"

if [ "x$s1" == "x$s2" ]
then
  echo match
fi

Adding additional string inside makes it more safe.

You could also use other notation for single line commands:

[ "x$s1" == "x$s2" ] && echo match
share|improve this answer
    
What does it mean "more safe"? It is important to explain any such qualification, for sake of completeness and clarity. – mloskot Jul 9 '13 at 21:53
1  
the truth it's not safer, now I know that would be safer if you would not quote it and this way prevent syntax error if one of them was empty – mpapis Jul 10 '13 at 1:26

I would suggest:

#!/bin/bash

s1="hi"
s2="hi"

if [ $s1 = $s2 ]
then
  echo match
fi

Without the double quotes and with only one equals.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes that's true, I missed the spaces. With "[ $s1 = $s2 ]" it works. – jzrk Nov 25 '10 at 13:51
    
Why would you omit the double quotes? They are optional but harmless in this limited specific case, but removing them would be a serious bug in many real-world situations. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/10067266/… – tripleee Feb 6 at 10:53

For a version with pure Bash and without test, but really ugly, try:

if ( exit "${s1/*$s2*/0}" )2>/dev/null
then
   echo match
fi

Explanation: In ( )an extra subshell is opened. It exits with 0 if there was a match, and it tries to exit with $s1 if there was no match which raises an error (ugly). This error is directed to /dev/null.

share|improve this answer
    
Not bad at all. Like the explanation and the sed regexp like. I never need to use subshell that way. As i know you can get the output with command or $(command). Im sure you can TEST it then make it better. – erm3nda Apr 18 '15 at 19:49

Yes , the clue is in the error message:

[hi: command not found

which shows you that your "hi" has been concatenated to the "[".

Unlike in more traditional programming languages, in Bash, "[" is a command just like the more obvious "ls" etc. - it's not treated specially just because it's a symbol, hence the "[" and the (substituted) "$s1" which are immediately next to each other in your question, are joined (as is correct for Bash) and it then tries to find a command in that position: [hi - which is unknown to Bash.

In C and some other languages, the "[" would be seen as a different "character class" and would be disjoint from the following "hi".

Hence you require a space after the opening "[".

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