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Duplicate: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/420275/


When I run the following code:

    foreach (object bar in list)
    {
        Console.WriteLine = bar;
    }

I get the following output:

System.Collections.DictionaryEntry

System.Collections.DictionaryEntry

System.Collections.DictionaryEntry

System.Collections.DictionaryEntry

System.Collections.DictionaryEntry

System.Collections.DictionaryEntry

System.Collections.DictionaryEntry

But how do I write out the contents of each line above?

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Duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/420275 – George Stocker Jan 9 '09 at 23:26
foreach (DictionaryEntry entry in list)
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0}={1}", entry.Key, entry.Value);
}

EDIT: If you want it to work for anything, and recurse down into whatever objects are within the results (e.g. into the children Object[] as per Kloti's reply) you'll basically need to use reflection. I would do something like this:

  • Check for null (and just print "null" if so)
  • Find out the execution time type of the object with GetType()
  • Have a known list of pretty-printers, e.g. for lists, dictionaries etc. Delegate to a pretty-printers if one is applicable.
  • Otherwise, check if the type overrides ToString() - if so, just call that and assume it knows what it's doing.
  • Otherwise, check for public readable properties, and recurse down.

I suspect there are libraries to do this somewhere, but I don't have one to hand.

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This works for the particular example, but I would be interested in a solution that would work if all I knew was that list implemented IEnumerable and thus could be a List or a Dictionary (or ...) – tvanfosson Jan 9 '09 at 11:55

Re the second query (object[]) - see here.

(er, hang on! That is you as well! You've asked this question before... duplicate?)

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There is no generic solution that could traverse over any unknown data structure. However you can write a recursive algorithm that works for a known set of types (like scalars, dictionarries, lists, etc.), for example:

public void Dump(object obj)
{
  if(obj is IList)
  {
     DumpList((IList)list);
  }
  else if(obj is IDictionary)
  {
     DumpDictionary(dict)  
  }
  else
  {
    Console.WriteLine(obj); 
  }
}

public void DumpList(IList list)
{
    foreach(object item in list)
    {
      Dump(item);
    }
}

public void DumpDictionary(IDictionary dict)
{
    foreach (DictionaryEntry entry in dict)
    {
      Dump(entry.Key);
      Console.Write("=");
      Dump(entry.Value);
    }
}

For a nicer and more extensible solution you could use the Chain of Responsibility pattern, but I wanted to keep this example as simple as possible.

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JohnSkeet answered it basically, but missed the details. You need to box the dictionary into an IDictionary interface to access the DirectoryEntry class.

public void Test
{
  Dictionary<string, object> objectList = new Dictionary<string, object>();
  Dictionary<string, object> guidList = new Dictionary<string, Guid>();

  IterateGenericDict(objectList);
  IterateGenericDict(guidList);
}

public void IterateGenericDict(object obj)
{
  foreach (DictionaryEntry entry in (IDictionary)obj)
  {                    
    Console.WriteLine(entry.Key + "=" entray.Value.ToString());
  }
}
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