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I am trying to understand a line of Javascript. Hopefully someone can help me understand what this line of code means.

var direction = this.hasClass('up') ? 'up' : 'down';

The bit I am interested in understanding is the ? and :

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marked as duplicate by Bergi Sep 29 at 0:11

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3  
This is not related in any way to jQuery. It is ternary operator in javascript. hscripts.com/tutorials/javascript/ternary.php –  Marek Nov 25 '10 at 14:44
4  
This has been asked countless times: stackoverflow.com/questions/1688337/javascript-if-alternative –  stillstanding Nov 25 '10 at 14:49
1  
@stillstanding: Yes, that's JS 101, but you must admit, that it's hard to google for it (? and : are kind of tricky), if you have never heard the term. –  Boldewyn Nov 25 '10 at 14:56
    
Indeed it is @Boldewyn! –  mtwallet Nov 25 '10 at 14:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is a ternary operator to perform a conditional expression. Equivalent to:

var direction;
if (this.hasClass('up'))
{
    direction = 'up';
} 
else
{
    direction = 'down';
}

It takes the format

condition ? return if true : return if false

In this case, the return value is being assigned to a variable (direction).

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1  
"if(..) var direction = 'up';" is wrong because the variable is defined in the outer scope, not in the inner. –  Floyd Nov 25 '10 at 14:45
    
Changed to reflect this. –  Gazler Nov 25 '10 at 14:46

It's the ternary conditional operator.

It means "set direction to up if the current element has the upclass, else set it to down".

By the way, you might actually want:

var direction = $(this).hasClass('up') ? 'up' : 'down';
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This is not an jQuery-specific because its a shortcut for ifelse in JavaScript.

var direction = this.hasClass('up') ? 'up' : 'down';

means:

var direction;
if(this.hasClass('up'))
  direction = 'up';
else
  direction = 'down';

syntax:

var result = condition ? trueValue : falseValue;
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2  
it's not a shortcut (i.e. syntax sugar), it is an operator! –  abatishchev Nov 25 '10 at 14:48
    
in my opinion it is also a shortcut because it shortens the notation. but this diferent is trivial for peaple who doesnt have english as first language. –  Floyd Nov 25 '10 at 14:58

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