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Which is the fastest way to get the lines of an ASCII file?

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in .txt for example, basically i need the newlines –  Sunscreen Nov 25 '10 at 16:02
    
please change your title to something like "what's the easiest way to count the number of newlines in an ascii file from the terminal" –  Alex Brown Nov 25 '10 at 16:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Normally you read files in C using fgets. You can also use scanf("%[^\n]"), but quite a few people reading the code are likely to find that confusing and foreign.

Edit: on the other hand, if you really do just want to count lines, a slightly modified version of the scanf approach can work quite nicely:

while (EOF != (scanf("%*[^\n]"), scanf("%*c"))) 
    ++lines;

The advantage of this is that with the '*' in each conversion, scanf reads and matches the input, but does nothing with the result. That means we don't have to waste memory on a large buffer to hold the content of a line that we don't care about (and still take a chance of getting a line that's even larger than that, so our count ends up wrong unless we got to even more work to figure out whether the input we read ended with a newline).

Unfortunately, we do have to break up the scanf into two pieces like this. scanf stops scanning when a conversion fails, and if the input contains a blank line (two consecutive newlines) we expect the first conversion to fail. Even if that fails, however, we want the second conversion to happen, to read the next newline and move on to the next line. Therefore, we attempt the first conversion to "eat" the content of the line, and then do the %c conversion to read the newline (the part we really care about). We continue doing both until the second call to scanf returns EOF (which will normally be at the end of the file, though it can also happen in case of something like a read error).

Edit2: Of course, there is another possibility that's (at least arguably) simpler and easier to understand:

int ch;

while (EOF != (ch=getchar()))
    if (ch=='\n')
        ++lines;

The only part of this that some people find counterintuitive is that ch must be defined as an int, not a char for the code to work correctly.

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I can do a while until fgets returns NULL? like that: while(fgets(szTmp, 256, pfFile)) nLines++; –  Sunscreen Nov 25 '10 at 16:03
    
@Sunscreen: no, you can't. fgets() will return fragments if your line is longer than 256 characters and your count will be too high. You have to check for the EOL character. –  icanhasserver Nov 25 '10 at 16:18
    
cool, thanks a bunch –  Sunscreen Nov 25 '10 at 16:31
    
@Sunscreen: see edits. Now that it's clear what you really want, there is an approach I think is a bit cleaner than using fgets. –  Jerry Coffin Nov 25 '10 at 16:40
1  
I think there's one corner-case you've missed - what about a file where the last line doesn't end in newline? –  caf Nov 26 '10 at 1:54

Here's a solution based on fgetc() which will work for lines of any length and doesn't require you to allocate a buffer.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    FILE                *fp = stdin;    /* or use fopen to open a file */
    int                 c;              /* Nb. int (not char) for the EOF */
    unsigned long       newline_count = 0;

        /* count the newline characters */
    while ( (c=fgetc(fp)) != EOF ) {
        if ( c == '\n' )
            newline_count++;
    }

    printf("%lu newline characters\n", newline_count);
    return 0;
}
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I've tried a million different ways count new lines in all of the methods suggested above and yours was the only one that worked for me! So thank you –  Maheen Siddiqui Aug 19 '13 at 23:52

Common, why You compare all characters? It is very slow. In 10MB file it is ~3s.
Under solution is faster.

unsigned long count_lines_of_file(char *file_patch) {
    FILE *fp = fopen(file_patch, "r");
    unsigned long line_count = 0;

    if(fp == NULL){
        fclose(fp);
        return 0;
    }
    while ( fgetline(fp) )
        line_count++;

    fclose(fp);
    return line_count;
}
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How much faster? –  BlackBear Apr 26 '13 at 10:43
    
It depends on the length of the line. For my task it was ~400 times faster. –  Krzysztof Sz. May 15 '13 at 13:02
    
Why is it faster? The internal implementation of fgetline() also has to compare every character to find the newline... –  Max Snijders Jun 1 '13 at 11:28
    
in practice, I got such a difference results –  Krzysztof Sz. Jul 1 '13 at 9:12
    
readahead and multi-threading would make a difference (and a true aio filesystem) –  scheiflo Aug 26 '13 at 6:44

Maybe I'm missing something, but why not simply:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void) {
  int n = 0;
  int c;
  while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {
    if (c == '\n')
      ++n;
  }
  printf("%d\n", n);
}

if you want to count partial lines (i.e. [^\n]EOF):

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void) {
  int n = 0;
  int pc = EOF;
  int c;
  while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {
    if (c == '\n')
      ++n;
    pc = c;
  }
  if (pc != EOF && pc != '\n')
    ++n;
  printf("%d\n", n);
}
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1  
+1 IMO, this is the best getchar() answer as it deals with the last line not terminated with '\n'. Suggested minor simplification: int pc = '\n'; while (..) { ...} if (pc != '\n') ++n; –  chux Apr 29 at 22:51

What about this?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

#define BUFFER_SIZE 4096

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    int count;
    int bytes;
    FILE* f;
    char buffer[BUFFER_SIZE + 1];
    char* ptr;

    if (argc != 2 || !(f = fopen(argv[1], "r")))
    {
        return -1;
    }

    count = 0;
    while(!feof(f))
    {
        bytes = fread(buffer, sizeof(char), BUFFER_SIZE, f);
        if (bytes <= 0)
        {
            return -1;
        }

        buffer[bytes] = '\0';
        for (ptr = buffer; ptr; ptr = strchr(ptr, '\n'))
        {
            ++count;
            ++ptr;
        }
    }

    fclose(f);

    printf("%d\n", count - 1);

    return 0;
}
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no reason to buffer stdio's buffered input. Also, this will report -1 on an empty file. –  vlabrecque Nov 25 '10 at 17:06
    
Do not recommend this. It exits with -1 on any file whose length is a multiple of BUFFER_SIZE including an empty file as noted by @vlabrecque. –  chux Apr 30 at 11:45

Maybe related to a similar question: reading a text file into an array in c.

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