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What is the use of ObservableCollection in .net?

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1  
@alpha-mouse: Can you give a bit more information about the problem you're trying to solve? This will help people give you relevant examples. –  Jazza Nov 25 '10 at 16:42
    
@Jazza: I've just changed tags of the question=) I't santosh's question –  alpha-mouse Nov 25 '10 at 16:45
1  
Down voter please provide explanation –  geek May 31 '14 at 11:30
4  
It probably got downvoted for the same reason I would (but won't) downvote it. So simple to find this on MSDN. You will find the answer within 4.21111111 seconds that for all intensive purposes it's a collection that exposes an event that is fired when the collection has changed. –  The Muffin Man Sep 3 '14 at 17:44
1  
@TheMuffinMan true, yet I prefer the way things are explained on stackoverflow compared to MSDN's too rigid to formal way of explaining their own creations. –  Sizons Jul 30 at 10:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 61 down vote accepted

An ObservableCollection works essentially like a regular collection except that it implements the interfaces:

  • INotifyCollectionChanged,
  • INotifyPropertyChanged

As such it is very useful when you want to know when the collection has changed. An event is triggered that will tell the user what entries have been added/removed or moved.

More importantly they are very useful when using databinding on a form.

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ObservableCollection is a collection that allows code outside the collection be aware of when changes to the collection (add, move, remove) occur. It is used heavily in WPF and Silverlight but its use is not limited to there. Code can add event handlers to see when the collection has changed and then react through the event handler to do some additional processing. This may be changing a UI or performing some other operation.

The code below doesn't really do anything but demonstrates how you'd attach a handler in a class and then use the event args to react in some way to the changes. WPF already has many operations like refreshing the UI built in so you get them for free when using ObservableCollections

class Handler
{

    private ObservableCollection<string> collection;

    public Handler()
    {
        collection = new ObservableCollection<string>();
        collection.CollectionChanged += HandleChange;
    }

    private void HandleChange(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        foreach (var x in e.NewItems)
        {
            // do something
        }

        foreach (var y in e.OldItems)
        {
            //do something
        }
        if (e.Action == NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Move)
        {
            //do something
        }
    }
}
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1  
that's a good explanation. –  Kings Nov 19 '14 at 13:44
2  
e.NewItems & e.OldsItems may be null depending on the action. It may throw NullReferenceException. –  lomed Jan 11 at 11:55
    
sidenote: when Action is Move, the moved element will appear in both NewItems and OldItems –  modosansreves Mar 14 at 16:48

From Pro C# 5.0 and the .NET 4.5 Framework

The ObservableCollection<T> class is very useful in that it has the ability to inform external objects when its contents have changed in some way (as you might guess, working with ReadOnlyObservableCollection<T> is very similar, but read-only in nature). In many ways, working with the ObservableCollection<T> is identical to working with List<T>, given that both of these classes implement the same core interfaces. What makes the ObservableCollection<T> class unique is that this class supports an event named CollectionChanged. This event will fire whenever a new item is inserted, a current item is removed (or relocated), or if the entire collection is modified. Like any event, CollectionChanged is defined in terms of a delegate, which in this case is NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler. This delegate can call any method that takes an object as the first parameter, and a NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs as the second. Consider the following Main() method, which populates an observable collection containing Person objects and wires up the CollectionChanged event:

class Program
{
   static void Main(string[] args)
   {
     // Make a collection to observe and add a few Person objects.
     ObservableCollection<Person> people = new ObservableCollection<Person>()
     {
        new Person{ FirstName = "Peter", LastName = "Murphy", Age = 52 },
        new Person{ FirstName = "Kevin", LastName = "Key", Age = 48 },
     };
     // Wire up the CollectionChanged event.
     people.CollectionChanged += people_CollectionChanged;
     // Now add a new item.
     people.Add(new Person("Fred", "Smith", 32));

     // Remove an item.
     people.RemoveAt(0);

     Console.ReadLine();
   }
   static void people_CollectionChanged(object sender, System.Collections.Specialized.NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
   {
       // What was the action that caused the event?
        Console.WriteLine("Action for this event: {0}", e.Action);

        // They removed something. 
        if (e.Action == System.Collections.Specialized.NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Remove)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Here are the OLD items:");
            foreach (Person p in e.OldItems)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(p.ToString());
            }
            Console.WriteLine();
        }

        // They added something. 
        if (e.Action == System.Collections.Specialized.NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add)
        {
            // Now show the NEW items that were inserted.
            Console.WriteLine("Here are the NEW items:");
            foreach (Person p in e.NewItems)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(p.ToString());
            }
        }
   }
}

The incoming NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs parameter defines two important properties, OldItems and NewItems, which will give you a list of items that were currently in the collection before the event fired, and the new items that were involved in the change. However, you will want to examine these lists only under the correct circumstances. Recall that the CollectionChanged event can fire when items are added, removed, relocated, or reset. To discover which of these actions triggered the event, you can use the Action property of NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs. The Action property can be tested against any of the following members of the NotifyCollectionChangedAction enumeration:

public enum NotifyCollectionChangedAction
{
Add = 0,
Remove = 1,
Replace = 2,
Move = 3,
Reset = 4,
}

Members of System.Collections.ObjectModel

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1  
Really nice answer! –  Contango Sep 29 '14 at 14:27

it is a collection which is used to notify mostly UI to change in the collection , it supports automatic notification.

Mainly used in WPF ,

Where say suppose you have UI with a list box and add button and when you click on he button an object of type suppose person will be added to the obseravablecollection and you bind this collection to the ItemSource of Listbox , so as soon as you added a new item in the collection , Listbox will update itself and add one more item in it.

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really this happens ?? :O –  Kings Nov 19 '14 at 13:47

One of the biggest uses is that you can bind UI components to one, and they'll respond appropriately if the collection's contents change. For example, if you bind a ListView's ItemsSource to one, the ListView's contents will automatically update if you modify the collection.

EDIT: Here's some sample code from MSDN: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms748365.aspx

In C#, hooking the ListBox to the collection could be as easy as

listBox.ItemsSource = NameListData;

though if you haven't hooked the list up as a static resource and defined NameItemTemplate you may want to override PersonName's ToString(). For example:

public override ToString()
{
    return string.Format("{0} {1}", this.FirstName, this.LastName);
}
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class FooObservableCollection : ObservableCollection<Foo>
{
    protected override void InsertItem(int index, Foo item)
    {
        base.Add(index, Foo);

        if (this.CollectionChanged != null)
            this.CollectionChanged(this, new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs (NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add, item, index);
    }
}

var collection = new FooObservableCollection();
collection.CollectionChanged += CollectionChanged;

collection.Add(new Foo());

void CollectionChanged (object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
{
    Foo newItem = e.NewItems.OfType<Foo>().First();
}
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