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I just want to make the Simplest WAV Player. Here is MyCode.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(){
    FILE* speaker = fopen("/dev/audio", "wb");
    FILE* music = fopen("bugsbunny2.wav", "rb");
    char data[16];
    while(!feof(music)){
        fread(data, sizeof(char), sizeof(data), music);
        fwrite(data, sizeof(char), sizeof(data), speaker);
    }
    return 0;
}

This Plays the Sound However Its too Noisy. Hard to understand. I think I am missing on Buffer/Chunk Size Whats the Actual Chunk Size ? or How can I get the Actual Chunk Size ?

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Size of what chunk? 4 bytes is the size of a pointer, i.e. sizeof(data). I'd say you'll never see systems with a cluster size below 512 bytes, so create a buffer of at least that size. –  TheBlastOne Nov 25 '10 at 17:18
    
Also note you miss upto 3 bytes of the wav...think about it...if you increase the read buffer size significantly and don't correct for that bug first, you'll miss significantly more bytes, and bugs bunny will ultimately sound just like a BUG :) –  TheBlastOne Nov 25 '10 at 17:20
    
The simplest WAV player might be a trivial "Play the wav with this filename" API function that Windows, or Windows shell, probably offers. –  TheBlastOne Nov 25 '10 at 17:22
    
@TheBlastOne: Sorry I didn't understand. are you talking about checking WAV Headers ? BTW I am editing it with the Recent one. Plz Check the edit –  Neel Basu Nov 25 '10 at 17:24
    
Now I don't get it. Shouldn't you fwrite as many bytes as fread read (i.e. size returned as the function result)? Otherwise, you will write 16 bytes even if for example the last chunk of the file was 1 byte (because its size was not divideable by 16). –  TheBlastOne Nov 29 '10 at 11:58

3 Answers 3

I think, that you should to do some basic parsing of the wav file (plus, convert bytes from Little Endian to Big Endian, if needed [BTW, probably, this is a source of the noise]) or, at least, skip the part which is not interesting for you, because now you're even have no idea about size of the samples in the file (for example, in one of test wav file, that I got, sample size is 24 byte).

I'm recommending you to read WAV file specification.

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Ya I also Think so. I am currently Reading the Specification. However It seems too complex. I thought WAV would be too easy. –  Neel Basu Nov 25 '10 at 18:16
    
No, it [relatively] is simple: you need to know where data part is starting and how much bytes was spent on one sample [and convert sample from LE to BE, of course]. –  Oleg Kuznetsov Nov 25 '10 at 18:43
    
But even if I don't skip the Header Part it should not be the problem for the whole audio. it will just make noise for first few microsecs. But the rest should be Okay. and I've also done the LEto BE Conversion. Now I hear a long beeeeeep along with the noisy sound. –  Neel Basu Nov 25 '10 at 18:48
    
ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/422/projects/WaveFormat I Found this one interesting too. –  Neel Basu Nov 25 '10 at 19:31

The local data has no allocated storage but your code is reading and writing to it. Based on the sizes though it looks like you're trying to read and write 16 bytes of storage on every iteration of the loop. Use the following instead

char data[16];
while(!feof(music)){
    fread(data, sizeof(char), sizeof(data), music);
    fwrite(data, sizeof(char), sizeof(data), speaker);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ya I've done the Same. But its still the Same –  Neel Basu Nov 25 '10 at 17:22
    
@user256007 same what? –  JaredPar Nov 25 '10 at 17:24
    
The Same Noise. –  Neel Basu Nov 25 '10 at 17:26

How about

#include <stdio.h> 

int main(){ 
    FILE* speaker = fopen("/dev/audio", "wb"); 
    FILE* music = fopen("bugsbunny2.wav", "rb"); 
    char data[16]; 
    while(!feof(music)){ 
        fwrite(data, sizeof(data), 
            fread(data, sizeof(char), sizeof(data), music),
            speaker); 
    } 
    return 0; 
} 

?

fread returns the number of bytes actually read.

I am not sure, however, if you can just stuff any wav file into the audio device, and hear useful stuff..."audio" is not a WAV consumer I think.

Try using Data[1024] or Data[16384], too.

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