Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a lot of (e.g.) posts, that marked with one or more tags. Post can be created or deleted, and also user can make search request for one or more tags (combined with logical AND). First idea that came to my mind was a simple model

class Post(db.Model):
  #blahblah
  tags = db.StringListProperty()

Implementation of create and delete operations is obvious. Search is more complex. To search for N tags it will do N GQL queries like "SELECT * FROM Post WHERE tags = :1" and merge the results using the cursors, and it has terrible performance.

Second idea is to separate tags in different entities

class Post(db.Model):
    #blahblah
    tags = db.ListProperty(db.Key) # For fast access

class Tag(db.Model):
    name = db.StringProperty(name="key")
    posts = db.ListProperty(db.Key) # List of posts that marked with tag

It takes Tags from db by key (much faster than take it by GQL) and merge it in memory, I think this implementation has a better performance than the first one, but very frequently usable tags can exceed maximal size that allowed for single datastore object. And there is another problem: datastore can modify one single object only ~1/sec, so for frequently usable tags we also have a bottleneck with modify latency.

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
2  
Why/when do you want to search on multiple tags? Do you want to find the intersection (all posts with all of the provided tags), or the union (all posts with any of the provided tags)? –  Nick Johnson Nov 25 '10 at 23:22
add comment

2 Answers 2

To further Nick's questioning. If it is a logical AND using multiple tags in they query. Use tags = tag1 AND tags = tag2 ... set membership in a single query is one of datastore's shining features. You can achieve your result in one query.

http://code.google.com/appengine/docs/python/datastore/queriesandindexes.html#Properties_With_Multiple_Values

share|improve this answer
add comment

Probably a possible solution is to take your second example, and modify it in a way that would permit efficient queries on larger sets. One way that springs to mind is to use multiple database entities for a single tag, and group them in such a way as you would seldom need to get more than a few groups. If the default sort order (well lets just call it the only permitted) is by post-date, then fill the tag group entities in that order.

class Tag(db.Model):
    name = db.StringProperty(name="key")
    posts = db.ListProperty(db.Key) # List of posts that marked with tag
    firstpost = db.DateTimeProperty()

When adding or removing tags to a group, check to see how many posts are in that group, if the post you are adding would make the post have more than, say 100 posts, split it into two tag groups. If you are removing a post so that the group would have fewer than 50 posts, steal some posts from a previous or next group. If one of the adjacent groups has 50 posts also, just merge them together. When listing posts by tag (in post-date order), you need only get a handful of groups.

That doesn't really resolve the high-demand tag problem.

Thinking about it, it might be okay for inserts to be a bit more speculative. Get the latest tag group entries, merge them and place a new tag group. The lag in the transactions might actually not be a real problem.

share|improve this answer
1  
Lag in transactions can be solved by implementing a journal for adding posts. When post is queued for adding - it creates an special object with information like "Look! That post is belongs to that tag" for each tag it has (and also modifies memcache copy of tag entities), if memcache copy is expired, then journal applier collects all journal entries and applies it to tag entity in datastore (and also copies it into memcache). –  argos Nov 25 '10 at 20:23
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.