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Having trouble getting one portion of my code to work. Building a rudimentary linked list to learn pointers. I think I have most of it down, but any attempts to use a function I created (push_back) throws memory access errors on setting a value for a pointer.

Not exactly sure what's wrong, because it works fine to use push_front, which work almost exactly the same.

Any ideas? =/

CODE:

driver.cpp

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include "linklist.h"
#include "node.h"

using namespace std;

// printList function
// Purpose: Prints each node in a list
// Returns: None.
// Pre-Conditions: List must have member nodes.
// Post-Conditions: None.
void printList(linklist);

int main()
{
     linklist grocery;

     grocery.push_front(new node("milk", "1 gallon"));
     grocery.push_front(new node("bread","2 loaves"));
     grocery.push_front(new node("eggs","1 dozen"));
     grocery.push_front(new node("bacon","1 package"));
     cout << "First iteration:" << endl;
     printList(grocery);
     cout << "----------------------" << endl << endl;

     grocery.push_front(new node("hamburger","2 pounds"));
     grocery.push_front(new node("hamburger buns", "1 dozen"));
     cout << "Second iteration:" << endl;
     printList(grocery);
     cout << "----------------------" << endl << endl;

     node* deleteMe = grocery.pop_front();
     delete deleteMe;
     cout << "Third iteration:" << endl;
     printList(grocery);
     cout << "----------------------" << endl << endl;

     grocery.push_back(new node("orange juice","2 cans"));
     grocery.push_back(new node("swiss cheeese","1 pound"));
     cout << "Fourth iteration:" << endl;
     printList(grocery);
     cout << "----------------------" << endl << endl;

     deleteMe = grocery.pop_back();
     delete deleteMe;
     cout << "Fifth iteration:" << endl;
     printList(grocery);
     cout << "----------------------" << endl << endl;

     while (grocery.getNodeCount() != 0)
     {
          deleteMe = grocery.pop_front();
          cout << "Cleaning: " << deleteMe->getDescription() << endl;
          delete deleteMe;
     }

     system("PAUSE");
     return 0;
}

void printList(linklist input)
{
   node* temp = input.getFirst();
   for (int i = 0; i < (input.getNodeCount()); i++)
   {
      cout << temp->getQuantity() << " " << temp->getDescription() << endl;

      temp = temp->getNextNode();
   }
}

node.h

#pragma once
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class node
{
public:
// Default Constructor
// Values, "none", "none", NULL.
node();

// Parameterized Constructor
// nextNode initialized NULL and must be explicitly set.
node(string descriptionInput, string quantityInput);

// getDescription function
// Purpose: Returns node description.
// Returns: string
// Pre-Conditions: None.
// Post-Conditions: None.
string getDescription();

// setDescription function
// Purpose: Sets node description
// Returns: Void
// Pre-Conditions: None
// Post-Conditions: None
void setDescription(string);

// getQuantity function
// Purpose: Returns node quantity.
// Returns: string
// Pre-Conditions: None.
// Post-Conditions: None.
string getQuantity();

// setQuantity function
// Purpose: Sets node quantity
// Returns: Void
// Pre-Conditions: None
// Post-Conditions: None
void setQuantity(string);

// getNextNode function
// Purpose: Returns pointer to next node in list sequence.
// Returns: node pointer
// Pre-Conditions: None.
// Post-Conditions: None.
// Note: Not set during initialization. Must be explicitly done.
node* getNextNode();

// setNextNode function
// Purpose: Sets pointer to next node in list sequence.
// Returns: None.
// Pre-Conditions: None.
// Post-Conditions: None.
// Note: Not set during initialization. Must be explicitly done.
void setNextNode(node*);
private:
string description;
string quantity;
node* nextNode;
};

node.cpp

#include "node.h"


node::node()
  :description("none"),
  quantity("none"),
  nextNode(NULL)
  {}

node::node(string descriptionInput, string quantityInput)
  :description(descriptionInput),
  quantity(quantityInput),
  nextNode(NULL)
  {}

string node::getDescription()
{
   return description;
}

void node::setDescription(string descriptionInput)
{
   description = descriptionInput;
}

string node::getQuantity()
{
   return quantity;
}

void node::setQuantity(string quantityInput)
{
   quantity = quantityInput;
}

node* node::getNextNode()
{
   return nextNode;
}

void node::setNextNode(node* input)
{
   nextNode = input;
}

linklist.h

#pragma once
#include "node.h"

class linklist
{
public:
// Constructor
// Builds an empty list
linklist();

// push_front function
// Purpose: Takes node pointer. Places that node at beginning of list.
// Returns: None
// Pre-Conditions: None
// Post-Conditions: None
void push_front(node*);

// pop_front function
// Purpose: Removes first node from list.
// Returns: Node pointer. NODE IS NOT DESTROYED.
// Pre-Conditions: List must have a node to remove.
// Post-Conditions: Node is not destroyed.
node* pop_front();

// getFirst function
// Purpose: Returns node pointer to first node in list
// Returns: node pointer
// Pre-Conditions: List must have a node added.
// Post-Conditions: None.
node* getFirst();

// push_back function
// Purpose: Takes node pointer. Places that node at end of list.
// Returns: None
// Pre-Conditions: None
// Post-Conditions: None
void push_back(node*);

// pop_back function
// Purpose: Removes last node from list.
// Returns: Node pointer. NODE IS NOT DESTROYED.
// Pre-Conditions: List must have a node to remove.
// Post-Conditions: Node is not destroyed.
node* pop_back();

// getNodeCount function
// Purpose: Returns nodeCount
// Returns: int
// Pre-Conditions: None.
// Post-Conditions: None.
int getNodeCount();
private:
node* firstNode;
node* lastNode;
int nodeCount;
};

linklist.cpp

#include "linklist.h"


linklist::linklist()
    :firstNode(NULL),
    lastNode(NULL),
    nodeCount(0)
{}

void linklist::push_front(node* input)
{
    node* temp = getFirst();

    input->setNextNode(temp);

    firstNode = input;
    nodeCount++;
}

node* linklist::pop_front()
{
    node* temp = getFirst();

    firstNode = temp->getNextNode();

    nodeCount--;
    return temp;
}

node* linklist::getFirst()
{
    return firstNode;
}

void linklist::push_back(node* input)
{
    node* temp = lastNode;

    temp->setNextNode(input);

    lastNode = temp;
    nodeCount++;
}

node* linklist::pop_back()
{
    node* oldLast = lastNode;
    node* temp = firstNode;

    // find second to last node, remove it's pointer
    for (int i = 0; i < (nodeCount - 1); i++)
    {
        temp = temp->getNextNode();
    }
    temp->setNextNode(NULL);

    lastNode = temp;

    nodeCount--;
    return oldLast;
}

int linklist::getNodeCount()
{
    return nodeCount;
}
share|improve this question
    
cleaning up the formatting, seems it went crazy on me. –  DivinusVox Nov 25 '10 at 22:05
1  
Select the whole code and click that button with ones and zeroes. –  Dialecticus Nov 25 '10 at 22:11
2  
if the crash is in push_back, maybe you should provide linklist.cpp ? –  icecrime Nov 25 '10 at 22:14
2  
It would be helpful to see the code for push_front, too. –  Vlad Nov 25 '10 at 22:15
    
Sorry, thought I had it in there. One sec. –  DivinusVox Nov 25 '10 at 22:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

According to node's definition it's a single-linked list. (otherwise you'd have to contain also prevNode).

Hence - manipulating the "back" of your list is non-trivial. To pop the "back" of your list you'll need to transverse the entire list and identify the new "last" element.

Are you sure you do this right? Including handling all the "extremal" cases (like removing last element and etc.)?

It'd be nice to post the code of push_back and pop_back.

P.S. Perhaps you don't set lastNode correctly in your push_front and pop_front. You may not notice this unless you're trying to manipulate your "back".

Post the code of push_front and pop_front as well.

EDIT:

Alright, I see the code. And there're plenty of errors.

void linklist::push_front(node* input)
{
    node* temp = getFirst();

    input->setNextNode(temp);

    firstNode = input;
    nodeCount++;

    // Missing:
    if (!temp)
        lastNode = firstNode;
}


node* linklist::pop_front()
{
    node* temp = getFirst();

    firstNode = temp->getNextNode();

    // Missing:
    if (!firstNode)
        lastNode = 0;

    nodeCount--;
    return temp;
}


void linklist::push_back(node* input)
{
    node* temp = lastNode;

    // instead of
    // temp->setNextNode(input);
    // lastNode = temp;

    // should be:
    if (temp)
        temp->setNextNode(input);
    else
        firstNode = input;

    lastNode = input;

    nodeCount++;
}

node* linklist::pop_back()
{
    node* oldLast = lastNode;

    if (firstNode == lastNode)
    {
        firstNode = 0;
        lastNode = 0;
    } else
    {
        node* temp = firstNode;

        // find second to last node, remove it's pointer
        for (int i = 0; i < (nodeCount - 1); i++)
        {
            temp = temp->getNextNode();
        }
        temp->setNextNode(NULL);

        lastNode = temp;
    }

    nodeCount--;
    return oldLast;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Should have that code available to you in linklist.cpp at the bottom of the entry. –  DivinusVox Nov 25 '10 at 22:27
    
This is nice but I posted it few minutes ago ( but without the code just explained ) –  Gaim Nov 25 '10 at 22:37
    
@Gaim: Yes, you're right. +1 if this matters to you :) –  valdo Nov 25 '10 at 22:39
    
thanks but it doesn't matter :) Just the note that it is not new –  Gaim Nov 25 '10 at 22:41

Well, when the list is empty, in push_back temp is NULL. Therefore temp->setNextNode(input) fails. You need to distinguish the special case of empty list.

By the way, if you allow the operations on both back and front, perhaps you need a doubly-linked list? Otherwise you'll need to traverse the whole (potentially huge) list in order to pop the last element, as you don't have a "direct" link to its previous element.

By the way, your operations are that of the deque, not the list.

share|improve this answer

It looks like you've got one simple error in your push_back:

void linklist::push_back(node* input) 
{ 
   node* temp = lastNode; 

   temp->setNextNode(input); 

   lastNode = temp; //this looks wrong
   nodeCount++; 
} 

As annotated above, I think you meant lastNode = input;

p.s. Take "exception safety" carefully into account. It is not uncommon for pop routines to return nothing, and instead be paired with a peek() routine, in order to support exception neutrality / safety.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the catch on that. Doesn't fix the access violation, but was a problem were that I could implement this function. :) –  DivinusVox Nov 25 '10 at 22:33

You have mistakes in push methods, because when you are pushing at front you don't control if this element is also the last one and similary when you are pushing at the end. It causes that you don't have connected whole list, because the beginning part don't know about ending part. I hope that this is understandable.

Also pop methods are wrong - same problem. You don't control if the list is empty

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think I do understand. I know from implementation that push_front works. Just places a new node in front of the current one, builds a pointer to the old first node, and replaces the firstNode entry on the list object. Trying to do something similar with the push_back - make a new node, override the existing lastNode's NULL nextNode value with an actual address and point it to the new last node. –  DivinusVox Nov 25 '10 at 22:26
    
@Divinusvox Try ti push_front and then push_back and print it. If I am not wrong then the list is not in consistent state because firstNode points to the first inserted which points to NULL, then there is lastNode which points to the second inserted which points to NULL. But the first node doesn't point to the second. Is it better now? –  Gaim Nov 25 '10 at 22:32
    
@DivinusVox It causes that your list has number of nodes set to 2 but if you are browsing through that from the beginning then the second node ( pushed from back ) is inaccessible –  Gaim Nov 25 '10 at 22:35

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