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I'm attempting to implement some mechanism in C++ whereby all classes derived from a common base class are assigned a unique "class ID". For example:

class BaseClass  
{  
    //...
    public: unsigned int GetID( void );
    //...
};
class DerivedClass : public BaseClass
{
}

Class DerivedClass, and all other children of BaseClass, should be able to return unique identifiers without any additional code added to DerivedClass...C++ is making this rather difficult for me, however. Any ideas would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance! ---Dan

share|improve this question
    
should the ID be int or can be any unique type e.g. the one returned by typeid. Is your BaseClass Polymorphic? – Chubsdad Nov 26 '10 at 2:11
    
My base class IS polymorphic, but due to my lack of ability to find a solid and thorough explanation as to the exact nature of the overhead that accompanies RTTI(both performance- and memory-wise), I'm trying to avoid it altogether. – Dan Nov 26 '10 at 2:13

You don't indicate that you're familiar with typeid and dynamic_cast.

Chances are they solve your problem.

If not then please describe the reason why not.

Cheers & hth.,

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't that a comment? – Chubsdad Nov 26 '10 at 2:07
    
Sorry, forgot to mention: Trying to avoid RTTI if possible, as I've heard varying stories as to how much overhead it entails and don't want to take chances, as performance is critical to my application. – Dan Nov 26 '10 at 2:10
2  
@Dan: whenever you think you can do better than the compiler, think twice. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 26 '10 at 2:14
1  
@Dan: when you say you don't want to take chances, as performance is critical, do you seriously mean that you can't even perform a test run using typeid? Who will die if you do a test run, and it's kind of slower than you hoped? – Steve Jessop Nov 26 '10 at 2:17
2  
@Chubsdad: OK, but I read his reliance on opinion over actual performance as a bit suspect. – Steve Jessop Nov 26 '10 at 2:23

You should listen to Alf :) Here's my analysis: in the pure world, identification of implementations threatens virtual function polymorphism, can't be required and shouldn't be needed.

In the dirty world of real programming, you may have some reasons for unique identification such as marshaling data to disk, identifying diagnostic messages, tracing control flow, accumulating usage statistics, etc.

If your thoughts are pure, your design is wrong. Go away and figure out why you cannot require a unique id.

If you thoughts are corrupted by reality, then you are already willing to pay a price in performance and memory to meet your requirements, and then by specification the cost of using the built-in language features is worth paying, since it is pretty much the only way to achieve your goal of providing a non-invasive identification service. By non-invasive I mean you don't need to add anything to each derived class. Clearly something must be added, so if you're unwilling to do so, you have little choice but to accept that which the compiler adds for you.

The main gotcha here is that if you're using dynamically loaded shared libraries (DLLS) RTTI may not work as expected. This doesn't just affect typeid adversely, it can also prevent catching exceptions you expect to get caught (I have been bitten!). Some care may be needed to ensure vtables and other RTTI are uniquely created. This may mean, for example, that if the vtables hook on your destructor, it is not inline, because it may be generated in more than one place in that case, destroying uniqueness. Some hacking about may be necessary here in the absence of ISO Standardisation support for dynamic loading.

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You seem to know quite a bit about the inner workings of RTTI. Is there anywhere online that you know of that has a thorough description of the mechanisms used on a compiler level to implement the feature? – Dan Nov 26 '10 at 22:40
    
I don't have links handy, but places to look are of course gcc development sites, and the industry ABI specifications, originally produced by AMD but now managed by an industry group. That basically lays out the API used for x86_64 processors for various C++ features including argument passing in registers, exception handling, dynamic linkage etc etc. – Yttrill Dec 4 '10 at 22:33

As Alf says, this shouldn't be necessary. typeid already gives a unique class identifier, although the identifier isn't an integer. Just for laughs, if I'm allowed to relax the "common base class" condition then:

inline unsigned int counter() {
    static unsigned int count = 0;
    return ++count;
}

struct BaseClass {
    virtual unsigned int GetID() = 0;
    virtual ~BaseClass() {}
};

template <typename D>
struct IntermediateClass : BaseClass {
    virtual unsigned int GetID() {
        static unsigned int thisid = counter();
        return thisid;
    }
};

// usage
struct Derived : IntermediateClass<Derived> {
    ...
};

You'd need to add thread-safety in counter if it's to be used in multi-threaded programs.

Obviously the ID is only unique within a given run of the program.

It gets a bit hairy if your inheritance hierarchy is deep, and if you have lots of constructors with different signatures for different classes, because you need to insert IntermediateClass between each derived class and its direct base class. But you can always bail out of all that as follows:

inline unsigned int counter() {
    static unsigned int count = 0;
    return ++count;
}

struct BaseClass {
    virtual unsigned int GetID() = 0;
    virtual ~BaseClass() {}
};

template <typename D>
unsigned int ThisID(const D *) {
    static unsigned int thisid = counter();
    return thisid;
}

// usage
struct Derived : BaseClass {
    // this single line pasted in each derived class
    virtual unsigned int GetID() { return ThisID(this); }
    ...
};

I guess there's an "opportunity" for a new language feature here: a virtual function which is defined in the base class as a template function with one "typename" template parameter, and which is automatically overridden in each derived class using that derived class as the template argument. Imaginary syntax, since virtual template functions are illegal:

struct BaseClass {
    template <typename Derived>
    virtual unsigned int GetID() {
        static unsigned int thisid = counter();
        return thisid;
    }
    virtual ~BaseClass() {}
};

Hard to justify a language feature on the basis of wanting to re-implement RTTI ourselves, mind...

share|improve this answer
    
This works well, but I lose the polymorphism of my class since the two derived classes are now inheriting from two different classes. – Dan Nov 26 '10 at 2:40
    
@Dan: I've been jiggering it a bit since you said your classes were polymorphic. In the first option, everything is derived indirectly from BaseClass, so you can still use Derived objects through BaseClass*. In the second option, everything is derived directly from BaseClass, which makes it much easier to manage constructors, but you have to add one (identical) function to each derived class. – Steve Jessop Nov 26 '10 at 2:43
    
Rats, just realised the line in each derived class isn't identical - it has to mention the class to disambiguate the call in the case where one of these derived classes extends another one, and hence inherits two GetIDImpl functions. I'll change that option. – Steve Jessop Nov 26 '10 at 2:56
    
@Steve Jessop: If indeed Derived class requires modification, isn't my way more simpler? – Chubsdad Nov 26 '10 at 2:56
    
@Chubsdad: I don't think so. Your way requires typing the unique ID into the source (I assume - you don't show the function implementations), so you'd need to somehow assign one and manage that centrally. With a 64 bit type, management could just be "programmer generates one at random", which isn't too bad. But certainly my way is only really simple in the case of a 1-deep hierarchy. – Steve Jessop Nov 26 '10 at 3:03

This does require modification of Derived classes, but if lack of confidence in RTTI is the only reason to avoid well established route of typeid, dynamic_cast, THEN

Something like this should be a good bet. It also returns an 'int' as compared to 'type_info' by RTTI.

class BaseClass{   
    //... 
    public:
       virtual unsigned int GetID( void ); 
    //... 
};

class DerivedClass : public BaseClass{
public: 
   virtual unsigned int GetID( void );
};
share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to avoid a separate implementation for each DerivedClass; that's my issue. Sorry if I did not make that clear. – Dan Nov 26 '10 at 2:27

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