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I’m interested in the topic of Rails security and using Security on Rails. I'm on Implementing RBAC /page 142/ and i cannot get past the error in the subject. Here is the code:

module RoleBasedControllerAuthorization

  def self.included(base)
    base.extend(AuthorizationClassMethods)
  end

  def authorization_filter
    user = User.find(:first, 
      :conditions => ["id = ?", session[:user_id]])

    action_name = request.parameters[:action].to_sym
    action_roles = self.class.access_list[action_name]

    if action_roles.nil?
      logger.error "You must provide a roles declaration\
        or add skip_before_filter :authorization_filter to\
        the beginning of #{self}."
      redirect_to :controller => 'root', :action => 'index'
      return false
    elsif action_roles.include? user.role.name.to_sym
      return true
    else
      logger.info "#{user.user_name} (role: #{user.role.name}) attempted to access\
        #{self.class}##{action_name} without the proper permissions."
      flash[:notice] = "Not authorized!"
      redirect_to :controller => 'root', :action => 'index'
      return false
    end
  end      
end    

module AuthorizationClassMethods
  def self.extended(base)
    class << base
      @access_list = {}
      attr_reader :access_list 
    end
  end

  def roles(*roles)
    @roles = roles 
  end

  def method_added(method)
    logger.debug "#{caller[0].inspect}"
    logger.debug "#{method.inspect}"
    @access_list[method] = @roles  
  end
end

And @access_list[method] = @roles line throwing following exception:

ActionController::RoutingError (You have a nil object when you didn't expect it!
You might have expected an instance of ActiveRecord::Base.
The error occurred while evaluating nil.[]=):
  app/security/role_based_controller_authorization.rb:66:in `method_added'
  app/controllers/application_controller.rb:5:in `<class:ApplicationController>'
  app/controllers/application_controller.rb:1:in `<top (required)>'
  app/controllers/home_controller.rb:1:in `<top (required)>'

I'm using Rails 3.0.3 and Ruby 1.9.2. I'm storing session in database. In finally thank you for every advise.

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That book is probably written for Rails 2.3 and Ruby 1.8. There have been very significant changes in both with the latest versions. I'd try running it on that combo and see if there are still issues. If you use RVM you can switch rails and ruby versions really quick. –  rwilliams Nov 26 '10 at 2:44
    
Ok. I'm using RVM. But i need it on Rails 3 and Ruby 1.9.2. Please help me? –  Zeck Nov 26 '10 at 2:51
1  
When you add exception backtrace, try to mark at least some line numbers, because it's hard to know, about what lines exception is. –  Nakilon Nov 26 '10 at 2:56
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3 Answers

Your defining @access_list as a instance variable of the class but your accessing it in as a instance_variable of an instance of the class. The following should probably work:

module AuthorizationClassMethods
  def access_list
    @access_list ||={}
  end

  def method_added(method)
    logger.debug "#{caller[0].inspect}"
    logger.debug "#{method.inspect}"
    access_list[method] = @roles  
  end
end

If you need Auhorization you might want to check out Cancan by Ryan Bates

https://github.com/ryanb/cancan

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I'm not sure if this is the problem, but this looks suspicious:

class << base
  @access_list = {}
  attr_reader :access_list 
end

Shouldn't @access_list be a class variable @@access_list?

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It seems like you can't access @access_list in method_added. I would try

class << base
  attr_accessor :access_list 
  @access_list = {}
end

Might not solve your particular problem, but otherwise you won't be able to call @access_list[method] = @roles if your access_list attribute is read-only.

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@access_list would normally be in scope inside the instance so the accessor wouldn't be needed. attr_accessor creates getter/setter methods that allow code outside the instance to get at the value of the instance variable, without the developer having to explicitly write them. –  the Tin Man Nov 26 '10 at 3:40
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