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which one is better in Java code style?

boolean status = true;
if(!status) {
  //do sth
} else {
  //do sth
}

or

if(status == false) {
  //do sth
} else {
  //do sth
}
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switch (status) { case true: { ...; break; } default: { ...; break; } } :) –  tchrist Dec 1 '10 at 5:22
    
@tchrist: ... and your point is? –  missingfaktor Dec 1 '10 at 11:19
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10 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Former, of course. Latter is redundant, and only goes to show that you haven't understood the concept of booleans very well.

One more suggestion: Choose a different name for your boolean variable. As per this Java style guide:

is prefix should be used for boolean variables and methods.

isSet, isVisible, isFinished, isFound, isOpen

This is the naming convention for boolean methods and variables used by Sun for the Java core packages.

Using the is prefix solves a common problem of choosing bad boolean names like status or flag. isStatus or isFlag simply doesn't fit, and the programmer is forced to chose more meaningful names.

Setter methods for boolean variables must have set prefix as in:

void setFound(boolean isFound);

There are a few alternatives to the is prefix that fits better in some situations. These are has, can and should prefixes:

boolean hasLicense();
boolean canEvaluate();
boolean shouldAbort = false;
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Try good_status or fair_weather_status or status_known or status_unknown or even status_malus__vana_salus__semper_dissolubilis. :) –  tchrist Dec 1 '10 at 5:06
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I would suggest that you do:

if (status) {
    //positive work
} else {
    // negative work
}

The == tests, while obviously redundant, also run the risk of a single = typo which would result in an assignment.

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2  
+1 for pointing out the danger of mistakenly typing single "=" –  RAY Nov 26 '10 at 5:40
    
+1 from me for interchanging the place of positive and negative logic. –  Mudassir Nov 26 '10 at 5:44
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If you look at the alternatives on this page, of course the first option looks better and the second one is just more verbose. But if you are looking through a large class that someone else wrote, that verbosity can make the difference between realizing right away what the conditional is testing or not.

One of the reasons I moved away from Perl is because it relies so heavily on punctuation, which is much slower to interpret while reading.

I know I'm outvoted here, but I will almost always side with more explicit code so others can read it more accurately. Then again, I would never use a boolean variable called "status" either. Maybe isSuccess or just success, but "status" being true or false does not mean anything to the casual reader intuitively. As you can tell, I'm very into code readability because I read so much code others have written.

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+1 for choosing clarity over cleverness –  RAY Nov 26 '10 at 5:35
    
Good. +1 from me. –  Mudassir Nov 26 '10 at 5:38
    
agree with status being a horrible name, but !s is idiomatic in the C-derived languages for testing for false-hood. –  lijie Nov 26 '10 at 5:39
    
@lijie: While "!" is unambiguous, it is simply harder to notice when scanning code than " == false". Given that it completely negates the conditional after it, to me it's worth the extra typing. –  dj_segfault May 3 '12 at 17:14
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The first one, or if (status) { /*second clause*/ } else { /* first clause */ }

EDIT

If the second form is really desired, then if (false == status) <etc>, while uglier, is probably safer (wrt typos).

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+1 for (false == status), which also gives guidance for the if (0==i) question not asked –  subsub May 2 '11 at 14:06
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The former. The latter merely adds verbosity.

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It really also depends on how you name your variable.

When people are asking "which is better practice" - this implicitly implies that both are correct, so it's just a matter of which is easier to read and maintain.

If you name your variable "status" (which is the case in your example code), I would much prefer to see

if(status == false) // if status is false

On the other hand, if you had named your variable isXXX (e.g. isReadableCode), then the former is more readable. consider:

if(!isReadable) { // if not readable
  System.out.println("I'm having a headache reading your code");
}
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The first one. But just another point, the following would also make your code more readable:

if (!status) {
    // do false logic
} else {
    // do true logic
}

Note that there are extra spaces between if and the (, and also before the else statement.

EDIT

As noted by @Mudassir, if there is NO other shared code in the method using the logic, then the better style would be:

if (!status) {
    // do false logic
}

// do true logic
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@Downvoter - Care to comment? –  Nico Huysamen Nov 26 '10 at 5:59
    
Yeah, I downvoted your answer. But its not personal. –  Mudassir Nov 26 '10 at 6:25
1  
@Mudassir sigh... –  Nico Huysamen Nov 26 '10 at 6:27
    
Don't take it personally. Edit your answer and I will undo my downvote. –  Mudassir Nov 26 '10 at 6:30
    
@Mudassir - If you want me to update my answer, you need to leave feedback as to what is wrong with it. From looking at the previous posts, my answer seems to be the norm. Let me know what you have a problem with and I will edit it with pleasure. I'm here to learn just as much as I am here to answer other people's questions. –  Nico Huysamen Nov 26 '10 at 6:38
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First style is better. Though you should use better variable name

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My personal feeling when it comes to reading

if(!status) : if not status

if(status == false) : if status is false

if you are not used to !status reading. I see no harm doing as the second way.

if you use "active" instead of status I thing if(!active) is more readable

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this is more readable and good practice too.

if(!status){
//do sth
}else{
//do sth
}
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except I would flip the clauses you just test if (status) –  Peter Lawrey Nov 26 '10 at 8:44
    
Furthermore, you could reformulate the variable name with an "is-" prefix to indicate what the default value is. –  James Poulson Mar 23 '13 at 5:01
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