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What are the parameters that I should pass? The Ghostscript version I'm using is 8.71.

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1  
As mentioned elsewhere in this page, using Ghostscript for this needlessly decodes and re-encodes the JPEG data. See img2pdf instead, on this page. –  Robert Fleming May 14 '13 at 21:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted
gs \
 -sDEVICE=pdfwrite \
 -o foo.pdf \
  /usr/local/share/ghostscript/8.71/lib/viewjpeg.ps \
 -c \(my.jpg\) viewJPEG

reads my.jpg and produces foo.pdf. You will have to find where your installation installed the PostScript program viewjpeg.ps.

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use locate to find the location of viewjpeg.ps –  Vineet Menon May 28 at 7:13

https://github.com/josch/img2pdf

As mentioned by PleaseStand, GhostScript will decode the JPEG data, resulting in generation loss, as well as performance "ten to hundred" times worse than img2pdf.

ImageMagick (i.e. convert) also decodes and re-encodes the images.

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Thanks for this. Using any of the other methods takes forever with any nontrivial number of images. –  emacsomancer Dec 21 at 19:29

I've been using the same basic commandline Henry gave in his answer for quite some time now in a simple Bash script, with a few tweaks.

My full script converts multiple JPEG images to a multipage PDF, using this modified command:

gs \
 -sDEVICE=pdfwrite \
 -o foo.pdf \
  /usr/local/share/ghostscript/9.02/lib/viewjpeg.ps \
 -c "(1st.jpg)  viewJPEG showpage \
     (2nd.jpg)  viewJPEG showpage \
     (3rd.jpg)  viewJPEG showpage \
     (last.jpg) viewJPEG showpage"

It is called like this:

jpegs2pdf.sh output.pdf file1.jpeg [file2.jpeg [file2.jpeg [...]]]

The problem is that this command would use the same (default) page size of Ghostscript (usually Letter or A4 in portrait mode), and each JPEG image will be scaled to fit this pagewidth and/or pageheight, being placed on the lower left corner.

My script makes each PDF page use the same page dimensions as the original JPEG for the page. For auto-discovery of the JPEG's dimensions, I use ImageMagick's identify command:

 identify -format "%[fx:(w)] %[fx:(h)]" some.jpeg

Here is the code of the full script:

#!/bin/bash
#
#############################################################################
#  
#  Shellscript to convert a set of JPEG files to a multipage PDF.
#
#  Requirements: (1) Ghostscript needs to be installed on the local system.
#                (2) ImageMagick needs to be installed on the local system.
#
#  Usage:  jpegs2pdf.sh output.pdf file1.jpeg [file2.jpeg [file2.jpeg [...]]]
#
#  Copyright (c) 2007, <pipitas@gmail.com>
#                Use, distribute and modify without any restrictions.
#
#  Versions:
#          v1.0.0, Jul 12 2007:  initial version
#          v1.0.1, Jan 07 2011:  set viewJPEG.ps path (self-compiled GS 9.02)
#
#############################################################################

outfile=$1
shift

param=""
for i in "$@" ; do
   dimension=$(identify -format "%[fx:(w)] %[fx:(h)]" "${i}")
   param="${param} <</PageSize [${dimension}]>> setpagedevice (${i}) viewJPEG showpage"
done

gs \
  -sDEVICE=pdfwrite \
  -dPDFSETTINGS=/prepress \
  -o "$outfile" \
   /usr/local/share/ghostscript/9.02/lib/viewjpeg.ps \
  -c "${param}"
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hay i used ur script without identify -format and pdf was generated but .jpg images are aligned at botton how can i bring them to top of the pdf page. and identify -format "%[fx:(w)] %[fx:(h)]" some.jpeg returns null so i ca't use it. –  run Feb 22 '12 at 8:56
    
@run: which OS are you on to run identify? What does identify -version tell you? You know you could also use identify some.jpeg manually which will return a line indicating the WxH dimensions of the JPEG in pixels, which you can then use to to insert to the commandline manually.... –  Kurt Pfeifle Feb 22 '12 at 17:40
    
unix. and i achiecev it by dimension=$(identify -format "%w %h" "${x}") but is there any way other than using width and height to set image on top of the page instead of bottom. i would be delighted if i get any links to get good documentation on this. –  run Feb 23 '12 at 6:03
    
@run: you still didn't tell the output of identify -version. –  Kurt Pfeifle Feb 23 '12 at 9:55
    
@run: No, you can only get the image to the lower left corner in one go. But, after you placed the image on the PDF page successfully, you could employ a second step gs commandline to shift the image. That's why I wrote '...script makes each PDF page use the same page dimensions as the original JPEG for the page'. –  Kurt Pfeifle Feb 23 '12 at 9:58

alternatively on some linux distros convert pic1.jpg pic2.jpg out.pdf does the job with mixed results

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Worked for me well. Warning: very memory-hungry, merging 80 JPEG files took 30 mins of swapping here. –  liori Oct 16 '11 at 20:53
    
That's because ImageMagick fully decodes and re-encodes the JPEG data. Not only is this slow and memory-intensive, but also results in generation loss. See img2pdf elsewhere on this page. –  Robert Fleming May 14 '13 at 20:52

GhostScript is a PostScript interpreter, so it does not directly support a JPEG input, only a JPEG output. That said, it does support JPEG decompression (except for progressive JPEG).

There's a PostScript program and accompanying shell script that you can use to take advantage of this called jpeg2eps. To get a PDF, most systems have the script pstopdf available for use, which runs each of the input files (you would use the output of the jpeg2eps script) through GhostScript.

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I have Ghostscript version 9.10, so the command with the below line DIDN'T WORKED FOR ME

/usr/local/share/ghostscript/9.02/lib/viewjpeg.ps

so I modifid the command and edited the line and insted used this, IT WORKED FOR ME

viewjpeg.ps

So the NEW MODIFIED COMMAND IS below:

gs \
     -sDEVICE=pdfwrite \
     -o foo.pdf \
      viewjpeg.ps \
     -c "(1st.jpg)  viewJPEG showpage \
         (2nd.jpg)  viewJPEG showpage \
         (3rd.jpg)  viewJPEG showpage \
         (last.jpg) viewJPEG showpage"
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