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I am trying to write a sed expression that can remove urls from a file

example

http://samgovephotography.blogspot.com/ updated my blog just a little bit ago. Take a chance to check out my latest work. Hope all is well:)   

Meet Former Child Star & Author Melissa Gilbert 6/15/09 at LA's B&N https://hollywoodmomblog.com/?p=2442 Thx to HMB Contributor @kdpartak :)   

But I dont get it:

sed 's/[\w \W \s]*http[s]*:\/\/\([\w \W]\)\+[\w \W \s]*/ /g' posFile  

FIXED!!!!!

handles almost all cases, even malformed URLs

sed 's/[\w \W \s]*http[s]*[a-zA-Z0-9 : \. \/ ; % " \W]*/ /g' positiveTweets | grep "http" | more
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When working with urls, file paths, etc, I prefer using "|" as sed separator so I dont have to escape /. Example: sed 's|/path/to/some/file/|/newpath/to/new/file/|g' –  JP19 Nov 26 '10 at 9:55
    
@JP19, like it, would try this out –  daydreamer Nov 26 '10 at 22:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The following removes http:// or https:// and everything up until the next space:

sed -e 's!http\(s\)\{0,1\}://[^[:space:]]*!!g' posFile  
 updated my blog just a little bit ago. Take a chance to check out my latest work. Hope all is well:)   

Meet Former Child Star & Author Melissa Gilbert 6/15/09 at LA's B&N  Thx to HMB Contributor @kdpartak :)

Edit:

I should have used:

sed -e 's!http[s]\?://\S*!!g' posFile

"[s]\?" is a far more readable way of writing "an optional s" compared to "\(s\)\{0,1\}"

"\S*" a more readable version of "any non-space characters" than "[^[:space:]]*"

I must have been using the sed that came installed with my Mac at the time I wrote this answer (brew install gnu-sed FTW).


There are better URL regular expressions out there (those that take into account schemes other than HTTP(S), for instance), but this will work for you, given the examples you give. Why complicate things?

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Johnsyweb could you please explain your sed expression? Particularly the {0,1} notation. –  minerals Apr 11 '13 at 13:00
1  
@minerals: I've updated my answer and hope that helps. –  Johnsyweb Apr 11 '13 at 23:02
    
very much appreciated! –  minerals Apr 12 '13 at 19:50

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