Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have interface I and two classes A and B that implement it. The implementation of method f of this interface in A throws one set of exceptions and the implementation in B throws another set. The only common ancestor of these exceptions is java.lang.Exception. Is it reasonable to declare f throwing java.lang.Exception in this case? Any other alternatives?

The reason why I am asking is that on the one hand java.lang.Exception seems too general to me and one the other hand listing all exceptions seems impractical considering possible other implementations.

Example:

interface I {
    void f() throws Exception;
}

class A implements I {
    public void f() throws IOException {}
}

class B implements I {
    public void f() throws InterruptedException {}
}
share|improve this question
1  
You've discovered the biggest reason why checked exceptions are generally considered a failed experiment in language design... –  Michael Borgwardt Nov 26 '10 at 8:51
2  
@Michael Borgwardt - your comments and downvotes are off topic. –  Stephen C Nov 26 '10 at 9:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The reason for using an interface is to abstract away the implementation details.

By throwing these exceptions, you're exposing implementation details that probably should be abstracted away.

Perhaps it would be best to define a new exception. Then each implementation of f() would catch the exceptions it knows about and throw the new exception instead so you'd have:

interface I {
    void f() throws MyException;
}

class A implements I {
    public void f() throws MyException {
         try {
             ...
         } catch (IOException e) {
             throw new MyException(e);
         }
    }
}

class B implements I {
    public void f() throws MyException {
         try {
             ...
         } catch (InterruptedException e) {
             throw new MyException(e);
         }
    }
}

By wrapping the implementation exception, you're still exposing it to the caller and that can bite you when you're calling remote methods. In those cases you need to do more work to return useful information in a generic way.

Edit
There seems to be a bit of a dispute going on about the correct approach.

When we call f(), we'll need code like:

I instanceOfI = getI();
try {
    instanceOfI.f();
}
catch ( /* What should go here ? */ )

It comes down to what is a good Exception class to put in the catch block.
With OP's original code we could catch Exception and then maybe try to see which subclass we have, or not depending on requirements. Or we could individually catch each subclass but then we'd have to add catch blocks when new implementations throw different exceptions.

If we used Runtime exceptions it would come to much the same thing except that we could alternatively defer the exception handling to a caller method without even giving the possibility of exceptions any thought.

If we used my suggestion of using a new, wrapped exception then this means we have to catch MyException and then try to see what additional information is available. This essentially becomes very like just using an Exception, but requires extra work for the limited benefit of having a bespoke exception that can be tailored to the purpose.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I think that's the way to go. In java you just have to create a new class for anything. –  milan Nov 26 '10 at 9:20
    
+1 although I wouldn't suggest an interface throw a plain Exception –  Armand Nov 26 '10 at 13:30

You could just declare the exceptions you throw

void f() throws IOException, InterruptedException;

If you use a decent IDE, it will correct this for you. I just throw the exception in the method, which the IDE gives the optionsto add to the method clause and its interface.

share|improve this answer
1  
What if I add in the future one more implementation that throws something else? –  vitaut Nov 26 '10 at 8:37
    
+1 to counter random downvote. –  Stephen C Nov 26 '10 at 9:02

This seems a bit backward. You should be throwing exceptions that are relevant and possibly specific to your interface, or not at all. Change the implementations to wrap a common Exception class (although not Exception itself). If you can't deal with this you may want to wrap the Exceptions in the implementations with a RuntimeException.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for suggesting a RuntimeException –  Michael Borgwardt Nov 26 '10 at 8:53
1  
@Michael: I think that hinting at the checked/unchecked exception debate is completely unrelated to the issues raised by the question. –  Adrian Pronk Nov 26 '10 at 8:57
1  
@Michael Borgwardt - Throwing RuntimeException in this case is a very bad idea IMO. It is just a way of getting around declaring the exceptions that your interface throws. If you don't like checked exceptions, switch to C#. –  Stephen C Nov 26 '10 at 9:01
    
@Adrian: No, this issue is at the heart of that debate. –  Michael Borgwardt Nov 26 '10 at 9:17
1  
@Michael - I seriously hope that the Java language does NOT evolve away from checked exceptions. Indeed, I don't think it would be technically possible. –  Stephen C Nov 26 '10 at 9:59

A well designed interface will declare that it throws exceptions that it needs to throw. In this case, you should declare f as throwing IOException and InterruptedException.

What if I add in the future one more implementation that throws something else?

Then you modify the interface and any code that depends on it.

The other strategy is to create your own exceptions and use these to wrap some or all of the checked exceptions. If a new implementation of the method needs to throw different exceptions, wrapper them with your existing exceptions or with new exception subclasses. This avoids the need to change the interface method signatures.

For the record, it is nearly always a bad idea for a method to declare that it throws Exception. It leaves the calling method with limited error recovery options, and offers the programmer no clues as to what actual exceptions to expect.

share|improve this answer
    
-1: for suggesting an interface to expose implementation details. –  Michael Borgwardt Nov 26 '10 at 8:54
    
@Michael Borgwardt - I don't understand your point / down vote. Are you suggesting that it is a bad idea to throw IOException, etc? Are you suggesting that an application API should not throw application-defined exceptions? If so, I think you are very wrong. –  Stephen C Nov 26 '10 at 8:58
    
I'm saying that IOException and InterruptedException are not application-defined exceptions, they're implementation details. And having to modify the interface and any code that depends on it because a new, additional implementation throws another exception is an absolute impossibility in a real-world setting. Which is exactly why you keep that kind of exception out of the interface in the first place. –  Michael Borgwardt Nov 26 '10 at 9:16
    
@Micheal Borgwardt - sorry, but treating all non-application-defined exceptions as implementation details that should be hidden is totally impractical, and is certainly no "best practice". –  Stephen C Nov 26 '10 at 10:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.