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I have a far more complicated class structure than this, but boiling the problem down to its essence, this describes my scenario: I have two classes, A & B, that implement pure virtual base classes that share a common ancestor, and then a third class C that com-posits A & B. Finally, a template class that fills in the common methods in the pure virtual base:

struct I {
  virtual void r()=0;
};

struct A : I {};
struct B : I {};

struct C : A, B {
  void q(){
    r();              // the problem is here.
  }
};

struct D : C {
  virtual void r(){
  }
};

C* c = new D;
c->q();

My problem is, I can't see any way to get C::q to call r().

void C::q(){
  r();    // is ambiguous
  A::r(); // is pure virtual
  B::r(); // also is pure virtual
  D::r(); // C doesn't know about D
  ((D*)this)->r(); // is dubious and requires C to know about D.
}

How can I call the r() method from C so that the correct virtual method is called?


Sorry, I should have clarified that virtual inheritance can't be used here. I have found two solutions:

struct C : A, B {
  virtual void r()=0;
  ...

OR

struct C : A, B {
   using A::r;
   ...

Both appear to disambiguate the call to r() sufficiently for everything to resolve.

share|improve this question
5  
+1 for taking your problem and breaking it down to its simplest form. –  Ólafur Waage Nov 26 '10 at 9:00
    
Isn't r() going to be ambiguous in C without virtual inheritance ? –  DumbCoder Nov 26 '10 at 9:10
    
Did you mean virtual base class or just abstract base class? Because to make I a virtual base you need struct A : virtual I {}; and struct B : virtual I {};. –  Charles Bailey Nov 26 '10 at 9:11
    
@DumbCoder: r looks ambiguous to the compiler, but it is not. The only place its implemented is in D. This is the issue. @Charles: unfortunately this represents a COM inheritance issue, virtual base classes can't be mixed with COM. –  Chris Becke Nov 26 '10 at 9:14
    
using A::r; doesn't really help, at least the Standard says this will still be ambiguous. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 26 '10 at 21:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Redeclare method r as pure virtual in C:

struct C : A, B {
  void q(){
    r();              // the problem is here.
  }

  virtual void r()=0;
};
share|improve this answer
1  
Not sure why this was the accepted answer. It is a hack. Correct answer is virtually inheriting from I. –  T33C Nov 26 '10 at 11:45
    
Normally I would agree. But in my situation I can't use virtual inheritance. Of all the non-virtual inheritance solutions, this is the most elegant. –  Chris Becke Nov 29 '10 at 9:05

Try virtual inheritance

struct A : virtual  I {};
struct B : virtual I {};
share|improve this answer

Tell the compiler which part of the hierarchy to follow:

struct C : A, B {
  void q(){
    A * p = this;
    p->r();              // recent GCC compiles this
  }
};
share|improve this answer

It's ambiguous because the compiler doesn't know which r() to call, the one coming from A or the one coming from B.

The easy way is to write:

static_cast<A*>(this)->r();

or

static_cast<B*>(this)->r();

But I think that none of this is the answer you're looking for. You clean up the situation by inheriting through virtual the interface I:

struct A : virtual I {};
struct B : virtual I {};

Now, you can call

void C::q() { r(); }

as you would expect. The simple explanation of this is that, by using virtual, class C gets only one "copy" of the interface I, not two. This disambiguates your code.

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Shouldn't you be using dynamic_cast rather than static_cast ? There are virtual functions involved. –  DumbCoder Nov 26 '10 at 9:16
    
No, you're going upward the hierarchy, not downward. –  Simone Nov 26 '10 at 9:17

You haven't overloaded r() in the child structs, so it's still pure virtual. i.e have no implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
No, that's not the problem. –  Simone Nov 26 '10 at 9:12

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