Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Morning all,

I'll admit straight off that I'm new to development and trying my hand at Android. I've been trying to search the 'net to find advice on how to implement some "Hold Button to Repeat Action" - I've created a custom numpad from buttons and want a backspace-like behaviour. Having got so far, I called upon a friend who hasnt coded Android before, but done lots of C# / Java and seems to know what he's doing.

The code below works just fine, but I feel it could be done more neatly. I apologise if I've missed bits out, but hopefully this explains my approach. I think the onTouchListener is ok, but the way Threads are handled doesnt feel right.

Is there a better or more simple way to do this?

Thanks,

M

public class MyApp extends Activity {

private boolean deleteThreadRunning = false;
private boolean cancelDeleteThread = false;
private Handler handler = new Handler();

public void onCreate(Bundle icicle) {
    super.onCreate(icicle);

    //May have missed some declarations here...

    Button_Del.setOnTouchListener(new OnTouchListener() {
        public boolean onTouch(View v, MotionEvent event) {

           switch (event.getAction())
           {
               case MotionEvent.ACTION_DOWN:
               {
                   handleDeleteDown();
                   return true;
               }

               case MotionEvent.ACTION_UP:
               {
                   handleDeleteUp();
                   return true;
               }

               default:
                   return false;
           }
        }

        private void handleDeleteDown() {

            if (!deleteThreadRunning)
                startDeleteThread();
        }

        private void startDeleteThread() {

            Thread r = new Thread() {

                @Override
                public void run() {
                    try {

                        deleteThreadRunning = true;
                        while (!cancelDeleteThread) {

                            handler.post(new Runnable() {   
                                @Override
                                public void run() {
                                    deleteOneChar();
                                }
                            });

                            try {
                                Thread.sleep(100);
                            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                                throw new RuntimeException(
                                    "Could not wait between char delete.", e);
                            }
                        }
                    }
                    finally
                    {
                        deleteThreadRunning = false;
                        cancelDeleteThread = false;
                    }
                }
            };

            // actually start the delete char thread
            r.start();
        }
    });
}

private void handleDeleteUp() {
    cancelDeleteThread = true;
}

private void deleteOneChar()
{
    String result = getNumberInput().getText().toString();
    int Length = result.length();

    if (Length > 0)
        getNumberInput().setText(result.substring(0, Length-1));
        //I've not pasted getNumberInput(), but it gets the string I wish to delete chars from
}
share|improve this question
    
That does not really look like a question. The code looks o.k. though. –  Konstantin Burov Nov 26 '10 at 11:23
    
Agreed, the question is whether there's a better, Android specific way to do it. It feels like a lot of code to acheive something so trivial. –  Mark Nov 26 '10 at 12:43

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your basic implementation is sound. However, I would encapsulate that logic into another class so that you can use it in other places without duplicating code. See e.g. this implementation of "RepeatListener" class that does the same thing you want to do, except for a seek bar.

Here's another thread with an alternative solution, but it's very similar to your first one.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I82Much, their code looks to do a similar job. I'll see if I can take it on board :) –  Mark Nov 26 '10 at 17:09
    
The Repeat Listener is a great option. Oliv's implementation of it is more complete. –  Ben Wilkinson Jan 23 '13 at 22:08

This is more independent implementation, usable with any View, that supports touch event

import android.os.Handler;
import android.view.MotionEvent;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.View.OnClickListener;
import android.view.View.OnTouchListener;

/**
 * A class, that can be used as a TouchListener on any view (e.g. a Button).
 * It cyclically runs a clickListener, emulating keyboard-like behaviour. First
 * click is fired immediately, next after initialInterval, and subsequent after
 * normalInterval.
 *
 * <p>Interval is scheduled after the onClick completes, so it has to run fast.
 * If it runs slow, it does not generate skipped onClicks.
 */
public class RepeatListener implements OnTouchListener {

    private Handler handler = new Handler();

    private int initialInterval;
    private final int normalInterval;
    private final OnClickListener clickListener;

    private Runnable handlerRunnable = new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            handler.postDelayed(this, normalInterval);
            clickListener.onClick(downView);
        }
    };

    private View downView;

    /**
     * @param initialInterval The interval after first click event
     * @param normalInterval The interval after second and subsequent click 
     *       events
     * @param clickListener The OnClickListener, that will be called
     *       periodically
     */
    public RepeatListener(int initialInterval, int normalInterval, 
            OnClickListener clickListener) {
        if (clickListener == null)
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("null runnable");
        if (initialInterval < 0 || normalInterval < 0)
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("negative interval");

        this.initialInterval = initialInterval;
        this.normalInterval = normalInterval;
        this.clickListener = clickListener;
    }

    public boolean onTouch(View view, MotionEvent motionEvent) {
        switch (motionEvent.getAction()) {
        case MotionEvent.ACTION_DOWN:
            handler.removeCallbacks(handlerRunnable);
            handler.postDelayed(handlerRunnable, initialInterval);
            downView = view;
            clickListener.onClick(view);
            return true;
        case MotionEvent.ACTION_UP:
        case MotionEvent.ACTION_CANCEL:
            handler.removeCallbacks(handlerRunnable);
            downView = null;
            return true;
        }

        return false;
    }

}

Usage:

Button button = new Button(context);
button.setOnTouchListener(new RepeatListener(400, 100, new OnClickListener() {
  @Override
  public void onClick(View view) {
    // the code to execute repeatedly
  }
}));
share|improve this answer
5  
I like this implementation. There is one error in it however. The onTouch functin should return true, at least in the ACTION_DOWN case, otherwise no other touch events will be detected (the ACTION_UP in this case will never be called) –  bbedward Feb 1 '13 at 17:18
    
This is a really good solution. But make sure to implement ACTION_CANCEL as in sephiron's answer too. –  Leo Landau Aug 11 at 18:07
    
Thanks for comments, I updated it. –  Oliv Aug 22 at 9:35

Here is a simple class called AutoRepeatButton which can, in many instances, be used as a drop-in replacement for the standard Button class:

package com.yourdomain.yourlibrary;

import android.content.Context;
import android.util.AttributeSet;
import android.view.MotionEvent;
import android.view.View;
import android.widget.Button;

public class AutoRepeatButton extends Button {

  private long initialRepeatDelay = 500;
  private long repeatIntervalInMilliseconds = 100;

  private Runnable repeatClickWhileButtonHeldRunnable = new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
      //Perform the present repetition of the click action provided by the user
      // in setOnClickListener().
      performClick();

      //Schedule the next repetitions of the click action, using a faster repeat
      // interval than the initial repeat delay interval.
      postDelayed(repeatClickWhileButtonHeldRunnable, repeatIntervalInMilliseconds);
    }
  };

  private void commonConstructorCode() {
    this.setOnTouchListener(new OnTouchListener() {
      @Override
      public boolean onTouch(View v, MotionEvent event) {
                int action = event.getAction(); 
                if(action == MotionEvent.ACTION_DOWN) 
                {
                  //Just to be sure that we removed all callbacks, 
                  // which should have occurred in the ACTION_UP
                  removeCallbacks(repeatClickWhileButtonHeldRunnable);

                  //Perform the default click action.
                  performClick();

                  //Schedule the start of repetitions after a one half second delay.
                  postDelayed(repeatClickWhileButtonHeldRunnable, initialRepeatDelay);
                }
                else if(action == MotionEvent.ACTION_UP) {
                  //Cancel any repetition in progress.
                  removeCallbacks(repeatClickWhileButtonHeldRunnable);
                }

                //Returning true here prevents performClick() from getting called 
                // in the usual manner, which would be redundant, given that we are 
                // already calling it above.
                return true;
      }
    });
  }

    public AutoRepeatButton(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
        super(context, attrs, defStyle);
        commonConstructorCode();
    }


    public AutoRepeatButton(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
        super(context, attrs);
        commonConstructorCode();
    }

  public AutoRepeatButton(Context context) {
    super(context);
    commonConstructorCode();
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is a great solution. I changed the performClick() to performLongClick() and moved performClick() into the ACTION_UP condition. Only problem I have is that my buttons don't animate now. –  SparkyNZ Oct 3 at 22:31

Carl's class is self-contained and works fine.

I would make initial delay and repeat interval configurable. To do so,

attrs.xml

<resources>
<declare-styleable name="AutoRepeatButton">
    <attr name="initial_delay"  format="integer" />
    <attr name="repeat_interval"  format="integer" />
</declare-styleable>
</resources>

AutoRepeatButton.java

    public AutoRepeatButton(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
    super(context, attrs);

    TypedArray a = context.obtainStyledAttributes(attrs, R.styleable.AutoRepeatButton);
    int n = a.getIndexCount();
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        int attr = a.getIndex(i);

        switch (attr) {
        case R.styleable.AutoRepeatButton_initial_delay:
            initialRepeatDelay = a.getInt(attr, DEFAULT_INITIAL_DELAY);
            break;
        case R.styleable.AutoRepeatButton_repeat_interval:
            repeatIntervalInMilliseconds = a.getInt(attr, DEFAULT_REPEAT_INTERVAL);
            break;
        }
    }
    a.recycle();
    commonConstructorCode();
}

then you can use the class like this

        <com.thepath.AutoRepeatButton
            xmlns:repeat="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/com.thepath"
            android:id="@+id/btn_delete"
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:background="@drawable/selector_btn_delete"
            android:onClick="onBtnClick"
            android:layout_weight="1"
            android:layout_margin="2dp"

            repeat:initial_delay="1500"
            repeat:repeat_interval="150"
            />
share|improve this answer

Oliv's RepeatListenerClass is pretty good, but it does not handle "MotionEvent.ACTION_CANCEL", so handler does not remove call back in that action. This makes problems in PagerAdapter, and so on. So I added that event case.

private Rect rect; // Variable rect to hold the bounds of the view

public boolean onTouch(View view, MotionEvent motionEvent) {
    switch (motionEvent.getAction()) {
    case MotionEvent.ACTION_DOWN:
        handler.removeCallbacks(handlerRunnable);
        handler.postDelayed(handlerRunnable, initialInterval);
        downView = view;
        rect = new Rect(view.getLeft(), view.getTop(), view.getRight(),
                view.getBottom());
        clickListener.onClick(view);
        break;
    case MotionEvent.ACTION_UP:
        handler.removeCallbacks(handlerRunnable);
        downView = null;
        break;
    case MotionEvent.ACTION_MOVE:
        if (!rect.contains(view.getLeft() + (int) motionEvent.getX(),
                view.getTop() + (int) motionEvent.getY())) {
            // User moved outside bounds
            handler.removeCallbacks(handlerRunnable);
            downView = null;
            Log.d(TAG, "ACTION_MOVE...OUTSIDE");
        }
        break;
    case MotionEvent.ACTION_CANCEL:
        handler.removeCallbacks(handlerRunnable);
        downView = null;
        break;  
    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

Carl's class is pretty good, here is modification that'll allow speedup (the longer you hold the faster click function is executed:

package com.yourdomain.yourlibrary;

import android.content.Context;
import android.util.AttributeSet;
import android.view.MotionEvent;
import android.view.View;
import android.widget.Button;

public class AutoRepeatButton extends Button {
    private long initialRepeatDelay = 500;
    private long repeatIntervalInMilliseconds = 100;

    // speedup
    private long repeatIntervalCurrent = repeatIntervalInMilliseconds;
    private long repeatIntervalStep = 2;
    private long repeatIntervalMin = 10;

    private Runnable repeatClickWhileButtonHeldRunnable = new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            // Perform the present repetition of the click action provided by the user
            // in setOnClickListener().
            performClick();

            // Schedule the next repetitions of the click action, 
            // faster and faster until it reaches repeaterIntervalMin
            if (repeatIntervalCurrent > repeatIntervalMin)
                repeatIntervalCurrent = repeatIntervalCurrent - repeatIntervalStep;

            postDelayed(repeatClickWhileButtonHeldRunnable, repeatIntervalCurrent);
        }
    };

    private void commonConstructorCode() {
        this.setOnTouchListener(new OnTouchListener() {
            @Override
            public boolean onTouch(View v, MotionEvent event) {
                int action = event.getAction();
                if (action == MotionEvent.ACTION_DOWN) {
                    // Just to be sure that we removed all callbacks,
                    // which should have occurred in the ACTION_UP
                    removeCallbacks(repeatClickWhileButtonHeldRunnable);

                    // Perform the default click action.
                    performClick();

                    // Schedule the start of repetitions after a one half second delay.
                    repeatIntervalCurrent = repeatIntervalInMilliseconds;
                    postDelayed(repeatClickWhileButtonHeldRunnable, initialRepeatDelay);
                } else if (action == MotionEvent.ACTION_UP) {
                    // Cancel any repetition in progress.
                    removeCallbacks(repeatClickWhileButtonHeldRunnable);
                }

                // Returning true here prevents performClick() from getting called
                // in the usual manner, which would be redundant, given that we are
                // already calling it above.
                return true;
            }
        });
    }

    public AutoRepeatButton(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
        super(context, attrs, defStyle);
        commonConstructorCode();
    }

     public AutoRepeatButton(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
     super(context, attrs);
     commonConstructorCode();
     }

    public AutoRepeatButton(Context context) {
        super(context);
        commonConstructorCode();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This would have been even better if it was for all views, not only buttton. –  harvey_slash Jul 2 at 6:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.