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I have a struct:

typedef struct
{  
   int nNum; 
   string str;   
}KeyPair;

Let's say I initialize my struct:

KeyPair keys[] = 
{    {0, "tester"},  
     {2, "yadah"},  
     {0, "tester"} 
};  

I want to use the initialized values in a function. How do I pass this array struct as a function parameter?

I have:

FetchKeys( KeyPair *pKeys)
{
     //get the contents of keys[] here...   
}
share|improve this question
    
If you're writing C++ you don't need to write typedef struct, you can just declare struct KeyPair { ... } –  Tim Martin Nov 26 '10 at 11:07

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Should be

// Definition
void FetchKeys( KeyPair *pKeys, int nKeys)
{
     //get the contents of keys[] here...   
}
// Call
FetchKeys(keys, sizeof(keys)/sizeof(keys[0]));
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6  
I feel like I'm pissing into the ocean with how often I have to say this but please use size_t instead of int to represent object sizes and array indices. –  Chris Lutz Nov 26 '10 at 10:49
2  
#define countOf(a) (sizeof(a) / sizeof(*(a))) –  tato Nov 26 '10 at 10:50
1  
@tato no need to use #define here, you can use a template to do it: template<typename T, size_t N> size_t countOf(T (&arr)[N] ) return N; and does not have the side effect of accidentally passing in a pointer instead of an array. –  CashCow Nov 26 '10 at 11:21

i use VS 2008, and this works fine for me.

#include "stdafx.h"

typedef struct
{  
   int nNum; 
   CString str;   
}KeyPair;

void FetchKeys( KeyPair *pKeys);
int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{

    KeyPair keys[] = 
{    {0, _T("tester")},  
     {2, _T("yadah")},  
     {0, _T("tester")} 
};

    FetchKeys(keys); //--> just pass the initialized variable.
    return 0;
}

void FetchKeys(KeyPair *pKeys)
{
    printf("%d, %s\n",pKeys[0].nNum, pKeys[0].str);

}

I don't understand the difficulty. correct me if i'm wrong. To keep it simple, i avoided using vectors, templates and etc. edit: to know size of struct, you can pass one more arg.

share|improve this answer

Depending on what you want to do you can even use boost range and pass it to function as a pair of iterators:

void FetchKeys(KeyPair *begin, KeyPair *end)
FetchKeys(boost::begin(keys), boost::end(keys));
share|improve this answer

See this answer: How can I pass an array by reference to a function in C++?

Wrap it in a structure, nice and easy..

#include <iostream>

struct foo
{
  int a;
  int b;
};

template <typename _T, size_t _size>
struct array_of
{
  static size_t size() { return _size; }
  _T data[_size];
};

template <typename _at>
void test(_at & array)
{
  cout << "size: " << _at::size() << std::endl;
}

int main(void)
{
  array_of<foo, 3> a = {{ {1,2}, {2,2}, {3,2} }};

  test(a);

}

EDIT: URGH, I can't see the toolbar to format the code correctly, hopefully the tags works..

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Just a quick question; in C, identifiers starting with an underscore followed by a capital letter (i.e. _T) are reserved and using them results in undefined behaviour. Do you know whether C++ has this same restriction, even for templates? –  dreamlax Nov 26 '10 at 11:20
    
@dreamlax: See "What are the rules about using an underscore in a C++ identifier?". Identifiers starting with an underscore followed by an uppercase letter are reserved in any scope. –  Georg Fritzsche Nov 26 '10 at 11:23
    
@dreamlax, thanks, there was something odd going on and I couldn't format/comment etc. now seems to be okay... With respect to your question, I was just being lazy... –  Nim Nov 26 '10 at 11:40

How about?

template<int N> void FetchKeys(KeyPair const (&r)[N]){}

EDIT 2:

Or even

template<int N> void FetchKeys(KeyPair const (*p)[N])

with the call as

FetchKeys(&keys);
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the reference version... I would avoid the extra pointer of the second example if possible (it does not add any value and makes code less readable) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 26 '10 at 11:31

You can do it as @MSalters mentioned, or you can create a std::vector<KeyPair> and pass it to the function. Here is a sample code:

using namespace std;

struct KeyPair 
{ 
   int nNum;
   string str;  
};

void fetchKeys(const vector<KeyPair>& keys)
{
    //Go through elements of the vector
    vector<KeyPair>::const_iterator iter = keys.begin();
    for(; iter != keys.end(); ++iter)
    {
        const KeyPair& pair = *iter;

    }
}



int main()
{
    KeyPair keys[] = {{0, "tester"}, 
                   {2, "yadah"}, 
                   {0, "tester"}
                  }; 

    //Create a vector out of the array you are having
    vector<KeyPair> v(keys, keys + sizeof(keys)/sizeof(keys[0]));

    //Pass this vector to the function. This is safe as vector knows
    //how many element it contains
    fetchKeys(v);
    return 0;

}
share|improve this answer
    
That's how I would do it. –  graham.reeds Nov 26 '10 at 10:57
    
Indeed. Never use an array unless you are forced to (for instance, because of a legacy function interface). –  Gorpik Nov 26 '10 at 11:20

You just callFetchKeys(keys);

EDIT

Pay attention to declare FetchKeys' return type.

EDIT 2

If you also need the number of items, you add size as FetchKeys input parameters:

void FetchKeys(KeyPair*, size_t size);

and call FetchKeys(keys, sizeof(keys)/sizeof(*keys));

BTW, state all your question by editing your first post if you can.

share|improve this answer
    
And how would you know how many elements are in the array... ? –  Georg Fritzsche Nov 26 '10 at 10:45
1  
You don't - that's why you'll always see people recommending the use of std::vector over plain arrays. –  Joris Timmermans Nov 26 '10 at 10:46
    
@Mad: Psst, rethorical question. –  Georg Fritzsche Nov 26 '10 at 10:46

In c/c++ the name of the array (of any type) represents the address of the first element of the array, so keys and &keys [0] are same. You can pass any one of them for KeyPair*.

share|improve this answer
    
The correct wording is that in C/C++ arrays decay into pointers to the first element quite easily. That is not the same as claiming that the name of the array represents the address of the first element --the name of the array represents the array, and that is not a pointer to the first element. Take a look at @Chubsdad answer for a real use case (C++ only) where your interpretation would fail. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 26 '10 at 11:33
    
For a C test, try: void foo( int (*array)[5] ) {} int main() { int array[5] = {0}; foo( &array ); int array2[2] = {0}; /*foo(&array2)*/ } The code will compile for the first case as the array has 5 elements, but will fail in the second (commented out) case as the number of elements differ. The test verifies that the array is not a pointer to the first element, but has the size information --which is only available at compile time, and before the array decays into a pointer. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 26 '10 at 11:39

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