Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following array. It has a parent id that correspond with the id. I manage to create a function to sort and turn this array into a tree array. My problem stands that sometimes it does not work properly if the parent is after the child.

So how would I turn an array like the one below to a tree that doesn't need to be sorted first?

    [0] => Array
        (
            [menu] => 
            [parent] => 0
            [id] => 1
        )
    ,
    [1] => Array
        (
            [menu] => 
            [parent] => 
            [id] => 2
        )
    ,
    [2] => Array
        (
            [menu] => 
            [parent] => 1
            [id] => 3
        )
    ,
    [3] => Array
        (
            [menu] => 
            [parent] => 1
            [id] => 4
        )
    ,
    [4] => Array
        (
            [menu] => 
            [parent] => 4
            [id] => 5
        )

I have this function which does not work properly:

function page_tree($rows) {
    if(!is_array($rows) || empty($rows) ){
        return false;
    }
    // $rows = array();  //stores all the database rows that are to be converted into a tree
    $tree = array();  //stores the tree
    $tree_index = array();  //an array used to quickly find nodes in the tree
    $id_column = "id";  //The column that contains the id of each node
    $parent_column = "parent";  //The column that contains the id of each node's parent
    $text_column = "title";  //The column to display when printing the tree to html
    //build the tree - this will complete in a single pass if no parents are defined after children
    // vp(count($rows) );die();
    // while(count($rows) > 0){
    foreach($rows as $row_id => $row){
        $row_id = $row['id'];
        if($row[$parent_column]){
            if((!array_key_exists($row[$parent_column], $rows)) and (!array_key_exists($row[$parent_column], $tree_index))){
               unset($rows[$row_id]);
            }
            else{
              if(array_key_exists($row[$parent_column], $tree_index)){
                $parent = & $tree_index[$row[$parent_column]];
                $parent['children'][$row_id] =$row;
                $parent['children'][$row_id]["children"] = array();
                $tree_index[$row_id] = & $parent['children'][$row_id];
                unset($rows[$row_id]);
              }
            }
        }
        else{
            $tree[$row_id] = $row;
            $tree[$row_id]["children"] = array();
            $tree_index[$row_id] = & $tree[$row_id];
            unset($rows[$row_id]);
        }
    }
    // }
    return $tree;
}

Please note: where parent is (empty) (='';) it means it's the root.

share|improve this question
    
Quick question: why in your example is $rows[0][parent] == 0? –  Zecc Nov 26 '10 at 11:09
    
because there is a db row that has an id as 0 –  Val Nov 26 '10 at 11:16
    
And a quick suggestion: ignoring the fact you may want your code to be more robust, you can assume your flat hierarchy will come in order if in your database you use a powerful technique called the Nested Set Model. See dev.mysql.com/tech-resources/articles/hierarchical-data.html (scroll down until you see Nested Set Model) –  Zecc Nov 26 '10 at 11:32
    
Never mind. I was assuming the indexes on the array corresponded to the ids of the nodes. –  Zecc Nov 26 '10 at 11:33
    
@Zecc Nested Set Model adds complexity and may be overkill if you are always retrieving the full set. –  John Nov 26 '10 at 11:52
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The trick is to keep a kind of index (named $all below) with references to all nodes in the tree. The example below will add nodes that still need to be processed to an array named $dangling and add the final output to the $output array.

<?
// Test input
$input = array(
array( 'menu' => 'A', 'parent' => 2, 'id' => 4),
    array( 'menu' => 'B', 'parent' => 1, 'id' => 3),
    array( 'menu' => 'C', 'parent' => 2, 'id' => 1),
    array( 'menu' => 'D', 'parent' => '', 'id' => 2)
);

$output = array();
$all = array();
$dangling = array();

// Initialize arrays
foreach ($input as $entry) {
    $entry['children'] = array();
    $id = $entry['id'];

    // If this is a top-level node, add it to the output immediately
    if ($entry['parent'] == '') {
        $all[$id] = $entry;
        $output[] =& $all[$id];

    // If this isn't a top-level node, we have to process it later
    } else {
        $dangling[$id] = $entry; 
    }
}

// Process all 'dangling' nodes
while (count($dangling) > 0) {
    foreach($dangling as $entry) {
        $id = $entry['id'];
        $pid = $entry['parent'];

        // If the parent has already been added to the output, it's
        // safe to add this node too
        if (isset($all[$pid])) {
            $all[$id] = $entry;
            $all[$pid]['children'][] =& $all[$id]; 
            unset($dangling[$entry['id']]);
        }
    }
}

print_r($output);

Note that this will go horribly wrong if your input data is incorrect (e.g. an item with an invalid value for parent will cause an infinite loop).

share|improve this answer
    
thanks john.. . this sounds good however I have hit that infinite loop thing :( –  Val Nov 26 '10 at 11:59
    
found the problem it seems that parent id 0 (zero) should should be (null) so it's top level(root) node. –  Val Nov 26 '10 at 12:09
    
I have also tested it re sorting in different ways and it still works nicely so thnx again :) –  Val Nov 26 '10 at 12:09
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.