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I hit a bizarre problem earlier which I have replicated in a new console application. I wonder, can anyone explain why this occurs?

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        DoSomething(0);

        Console.Read();
    }

    public static void DoSomething(int? value)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Do Something int? called");
    }

    public static void DoSomething(MyEnum value)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Do Something MyEnum called");
    }

    public static enum MyEnum : int
    {
        test

    }
}

You get an error on the DoSomething line:

Error 1 The call is ambiguous between the following methods or properties: 'DoSomething(int?)' and 'DoSomething(MyEnum)'

However if you change the zero to any other number, there is no such problem.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The C# language specification states that there is an implicit conversion from the integer literal 0 to any enum type:

13.1.3 Implicit enumeration conversions

An implicit enumeration conversion permits the decimal-integer-literal 0 to be converted to any enum-type.

Therefore, any other integer literal can only convert to int? and is thus unambiguous; but the literal 0 is convertible to both int? and your enum.

It doesn’t matter which values are defined in your enum. Even if you have an enum like enum Test { Cats=7 }, the above still applies. Remember that all enums can have all values of their underlying integer types and are not restricted to the values actually declared.

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That's interesting, what happens if you have an enum of { Cats=7 } and you cast zero into it, what do you get then? –  SLC Nov 26 '10 at 12:30
    
@SLC: The value 0, of course. Similarly, if you cast 47 into it, you get the value 47, typed as the enum type. Like I said, enum types are not restricted to the values declared. You can cast any integer of any integer type to any enum type whose underlying integer type is the same. –  Timwi Nov 27 '10 at 11:14

This is because the literal 0 is implicitly convertible to any enum.

So in the first situation, the 0 is "equally" convertible to either int? or MyEnum. Neither conversion is "better" than the other so the compiler doesn't know which method you're expecting to call.

If you change the 0 to a 1 then it works because 1 is not implicitly convertible to MyEnum, so the only matching method is the one that takes an int? argument.

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What if you have an enum like enum Test { Cats=7 } ? –  SLC Nov 26 '10 at 11:18
    
This doesn't explain why the code works if you don't use a nullable integer: DoSomething(int value)? –  Darin Dimitrov Nov 26 '10 at 11:19
1  
@Darin: The OP didn't ask that, but if you use int rather than int? then no conversion is required for that method, so it's a better match. –  LukeH Nov 26 '10 at 11:21
    
@SLC: It doesn't matter what values you use, the literal 0 is implicitly convertible to any enum. (And any non-zero integer can be explicitly cast to any enum, assuming that the range of the underlying type can accomodate it.) –  LukeH Nov 26 '10 at 11:27

An implicit enumeration conversion permits the decimal-integer-literal 0 to be converted to any enum-type.

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