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I'm trying to use composition in hibernate with annotations.

I have:

@Entity
@Table(name = "Foo")
public class Foo {
    private Bar bar;

    public void setBar(Bar bar){...}
    public Bar getBar() {...)
}

public class Bar {
  private double x;

  public void setX(double x) {...}
  public double getX() {...}
}

And when trying to save Foo, I'm getting

Could not determine type for entity org.bla.Bar at table Foo for columns: [org.hibernate.mapping.Column(bar)]

I tried putting an @Entity annotation on Bar, but this gets me:

No identifier specified for entity org.bla.Bar

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The mechanism is described in this section of the reference docs:

5.1.5. Embedded objects (aka components)

Apparently hibernate uses JPA annotations for this purpose, so the solution referred to by Ralph is correct

In a nutshell:

if you mark a class Address as @Embeddable and add a property of type Address to class User, marking the property as @Embedded, then the resulting database table User will have all fields specified by Address.

See Ralph's answer for the code.

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You need to specifiy the realtionship between Foo and Bar (somthing like @ManyToOne or @OneToOne).

Or if Bar is not an own Entity, then mark it with @Embeddable, and add @Embedded to the variable declaration in Foo.

@Entity
@Table(name = "Foo")
public class Foo {
    @Embedded
    private Bar bar;

    public void setBar(Bar bar){...}
    public Bar getBar() {...)
}

@Embeddable
public class Bar {
  private double x;

  public void setX(double x) {...}
  public double getX() {...}
}

@see: http://www.vaannila.com/hibernate/hibernate-example/hibernate-mapping-component-using-annotations-1.html -- The example expain the @Embeddable add @Embedded Composit way, where Foo and Bar (in the example: Student and Address) are mapped in the same Table.

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Where? Can you point me to a code sample? –  ripper234 Nov 26 '10 at 11:32
    
I'm reading through the link you sent - I believe that it assumes I would like to normalize the table representation. However, I think that in my case I prefer to embed these columns in one master table. Meaning - I want one table with all of Foo & Bar's fields as columns. Assuming this is indeed what I want - how can I achieve that with Hibernate? –  ripper234 Nov 26 '10 at 11:44
    
@Ripper234: No, have a look at the table in the example, it contains Stundent and Address fields. (The ER-Diagramme is a bit confusing, because it shows the more logical view, and not the Database.) –  Ralph Nov 26 '10 at 11:54
    
@Embeddable and @Embedded are not hibernate annotations, they are only available in JPA. The tutorial you linked to is pretty awful (not only because it doesn't mention that it's using JPA) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Nov 26 '10 at 11:58
    
Thanks, I was simply missing an @Embedded annotation. Please edit your answer to include this. –  ripper234 Nov 26 '10 at 12:06

Each simple entity must be marked as an entity (with @Entity) and have an identifier (mostly a Long) as a primary key. Each non-primitive association/composition must be declared with the corresponding association annotation (@OneToOne, @OneToMany, @ManyToMany). I suggest you read through the Hibernate Getting Started Guide. Try the following to make your code example work

@Entity
public class Foo {
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private Long id;

    @OneToOne
    private Bar bar;

    // getters and setters for id and bar
}

@Entity
public class Bar {
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private Long id;

    private double x;

    // getters and setters for id and x
}
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This creates two separate tables, but the OP wants bar's fields in foo's table. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Nov 26 '10 at 13:22

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