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I'm having fun with macros (not)

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

#define DEF_ATTRIBUTE(type, name) type name;\
    typedef void (*type_name_t)(CLASS_NAME*);\
    type_name_t ptr_type_name;\
    void type_name(){( ptr_type_name = &CLASS_NAME::type_name);}\

class Test
{
    public:
        #define CLASS_NAME Test
        DEF_ATTRIBUTE(int, i_Test);

        void Print()
        {
            cout << "Test::Print()" << endl;
        }
};

int main()
{
    Test t;
    t.Print();
}

Which expands to :

class Test
{
    public:

        int i_Test; typedef void (*type_name_t)(Test*); type_name_t ptr_type_name; void type_name(){( ptr_type_name = &Test::type_name);};

        void Print()
        {
            cout << "Test::Print()" << endl;
        }
};

And yields the compiler error :

main.cpp: In member function void Test::type_name():
main.cpp:16: error: cannot convert void (Test::*)() to void (*)(Test*) in assignment

As far as I can understand, the function pointers are equivalent. What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Using macros in C++ ? Putting macros in the middle of code ? –  Raveline Nov 26 '10 at 11:32
    
Here we go again. If you don't like it, don't post. I'm not asking for an opinion, just an answer. –  nakiya Nov 26 '10 at 11:34
    
I think this is one of those square macros trying to fit into a round problem. –  Skizz Nov 26 '10 at 11:45
    
@nakiya: Although the answers here do indeed answer the question, the question itself is hinting at bigger issues, i.e. using brute force (macros) to solve a problem where there is a set of language features that will do what you want. Search using Google to learn why C preprocessor macros are an unfortunate evil. In C++, macros used like this are usually a code-smell! –  Skizz Nov 26 '10 at 11:50
    
@Skizz : Of course, there are trade offs. That is why people still use C++ in the first place. But then, this is also a trade off. If I could do what I want in any other 'elegant' way, I would have. :) –  nakiya Nov 26 '10 at 11:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The function pointers aren't equivalent.

void (*type_name_t)(Test*)

is not the same as

&Test::type_name

Your function pointer is of type: a pointer to a function that takes one argument, a Test pointer, and returns no value.

What you want is a pointer-to-member-function, specifically, a pointer to a member function that takes no arguments and returns no value:

void (Test::*type_name_t) (); // note the empty parameter list!
share|improve this answer
    
Of course, this doesn't solve the using macros problem. Try having two DEF_ATTRIBUTEs in a class! –  Skizz Nov 26 '10 at 11:44

The pointer types are not equivalent: A type_name_t is a function pointer (a pointer to a free function), whereas &Test::type_name is a pointer to member function. This is what the compiler is telling you.

The reason you can't convert a pointer to member function to a simple function pointer is that a (non-static) member function has a hidden this parameter. You can't call a member function through a plain function pointer since there would be no way to pass the this parameter. You're trying to account for this by giving your type_name_t a CLASS_NAME* parameter -- conceptually the right thing to do, but C++ doesn't work that way.

Instead, what you need to do is to delare type_name_t as a pointer to member function:

typedef void (CLASS_NAME::*type_name_t)();

(Untested. I hope the syntax is right; I don't use pointers to member functions on a daily basis.)

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1  
How should I change type_name_t to match &Test::type_name? –  nakiya Nov 26 '10 at 11:39
    
void (Test::*type_name_t)(Test*) although I'm pretty sure that this isn't what you want to do. My guess is that you want to change the type_name() method into a static method. –  Let_Me_Be Nov 26 '10 at 11:42
    
@nakiya: Edited answer to show how the declaration of type_name_t should be changed. –  Martin B Nov 26 '10 at 11:43
    
@Let_Me_Be: You are right. If the stupid function-pointer to void* cast was available, I would have been home easily though. –  nakiya Nov 26 '10 at 11:50
    
@nakiya Well, such cast of course is possible, the problem is that function pointers can have different size then member pointers and those can have different size then void pointers. Not to mention that your code would break horribly if you would mix member pointers with function pointers. –  Let_Me_Be Nov 26 '10 at 11:54

The types are different.

&Test::type_name is a pointer to member function of class Test whereas type_name_t cannot hold the address of any member function of class Test. Its just a pointer to a free function (not to a member function).

Try this:

#define CLASS_NAME Test
#define DEF_ATTRIBUTE(type, name) type name;\
    typedef void (CLASS_NAME::*type_name_t)();\
    type_name_t ptr_type_name;\
    void type_name(){( ptr_type_name = &CLASS_NAME::type_name);}\
share|improve this answer

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