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I don't know how to explain the problem in plain English, so I help myself with regexp example. I have something similar to this (the example is pretty much simplified):

((\\d+) - (\\d+)\n)+

This pattern matches these lines at once:

123 - 23
32 - 321
3 - 0
99 - 55

The pattern contains 3 groups: the first one matches a line, the 2nd one matches first number in the line, and the 3rd one matches second number in the line.

Is there a possibility to get all those numbers? Matcher has only 3 groups. The first one returns 99 - 55, the 2nd one - 99 and the 3rd one - 55.

SSCCE:

class Test {
    private static final Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("((\\d+) - (\\d+)\n)+");

    public static void parseInput(String input) {

        Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(input);

        if (matcher.matches()) {

            for (int i = 0; i <= matcher.groupCount(); i++) {
                System.out.println("------------");
                System.out.println("Group " + i + ": " + matcher.group(i));
            }
            System.out.println();
        }

    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        parseInput("123 - 23\n32 - 321\n3 - 0\n99 - 55\n");
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

If I'm not mistaken (a distinct possibility), then every time you call matcher.matches(), it updates with the next match. So, basically, change the if (matcher.matches()) into a while (matcher.find()), and you're ready to go.

EDIT: Actually, it's not matches, it's find that does this:

http://download.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/regex/Matcher.html#find%28%29

Here's an example of using it:

http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/regex/test_harness.html

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Is it matcher.matches() or matcher.find() that will re-do each time you call it? (or both!) –  josh.trow Nov 26 '10 at 12:19
    
I answered a question yesterday about matches, and recall reading it, so I'm fairly sure about that. find, I don't know, unfortunately. –  Mike Caron Nov 26 '10 at 12:22
    
I cannot make it work. Do you have any code which succeeded with this task? –  Roman Nov 26 '10 at 12:36
    
Alas, I don't have a proper java development environment set up, so I can't test any code. However, it seems that josh.trow was correct. find() will match the next... match. –  Mike Caron Nov 26 '10 at 15:06

One more remark about the answer of Mike Caron: the program will not work if you simple replace "if" with "while" and use "find" instead of "match". You should also change the regular expression: the last group with the "+" should be removed, because you want to search for multiple occurrences of this pattern, and not for one occurrence of a (..)+ group.

For clarity, this is the final program that works:

class Test {
    private static final Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("(\\d+) - (\\d+)\n");

    public static void parseInput(String input) {

        Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(input);

        while (matcher.find()) {

            for (int i = 0; i <= matcher.groupCount(); i++) {
                System.out.println("------------");
                System.out.println("Group " + i + ": " + matcher.group(i));
            }
            System.out.println();
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        parseInput("123 - 23\n32 - 321\n3 - 0\n99 - 55\n");
    }
}

It will give you three groups for each line, where the first group is the entire line and the two following groups each contain a number. This is a good tutorial that helped me to understand it better: http://tutorials.jenkov.com/java-regex/matcher.html

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You're trying to match each line separately?

Remove the + to match only one line and change:

   if (matcher.matches()) {

to:

   while (matcher.matches()) {

and it will loop once for each match and automatically skip any unmatched text between the matches.

Note that matcher.group(0) returns the whole match. Actual groups start with 1.

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