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I wanted to rotate a Rectangle in matplotlib but when I apply the transformation, the rectangle doesn't show anymore:

rect = mpl.patches.Rectangle((0.0120,0),0.1,1000)
t = mpl.transforms.Affine2D().rotate_deg(45)
rect.set_transform(t)

is this a known bug or do I make a mistake?

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could you elaborate on the question, what exactly are you trying to do here? –  steabert Nov 26 '10 at 14:05
    
I want to add a Rectangle to my ax (this works fine) but instead of a straight rectangle, I want it to be tilted of 45 degrees. The final aim is to represent a "cut" in the axis. –  Mermoz Nov 26 '10 at 14:11
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Apparently the transforms on patches are composites of several transforms for dealing with scaling and the bounding box. Adding the transform to the existing plot transform seems to give something more like what you'd expect. Though it looks like there's still an offset to work out.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.patches as patches
import matplotlib as mpl
fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

rect = patches.Rectangle((0.0120,0),0.1,1000)

t_start = ax.transData
t = mpl.transforms.Affine2D().rotate_deg(-45)
t_end = t_start + t

rect.set_transform(t_end)

print repr(t_start)
print repr(t_end)
ax.add_patch(rect)

plt.show()
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I don't see why you need to add the ax.transData? –  Mermoz Nov 26 '10 at 17:14
    
I'm honestly in the dark about it as well. I would have thought that t_start = rect.get_transform() would have been the right incantation, but that didn't work either. –  mjhm Nov 26 '10 at 17:36
1  
I think the answer is correct, so I'll just add this comment about why: the fact that it didn't work before is that if you attach a patch without transform, this is defaulted to transData, as you can see from the add_path documentation. So if you do set it before, you need to add this to your transform. @mjhm: if you want to use rect.get_transform() for t_start, then you have to create the Rectangle with a transform= option. –  steabert Nov 27 '10 at 15:02
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Okay, I worked this out from a matplotlib example:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.patches as patches
import matplotlib as mpl

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

r1 = patches.Rectangle((0,0), 20, 40, color="blue", alpha=0.50)
r2 = patches.Rectangle((0,0), 20, 40, color="red",  alpha=0.50)

t2 = mpl.transforms.Affine2D().rotate_deg(-45) + ax.transData
r2.set_transform(t2)

ax.add_patch(r1)
ax.add_patch(r2)

plt.xlim(-20, 60)
plt.ylim(-20, 60)

plt.grid(True)

plt.show()
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