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I'm looking for a syntax like this:

class Hugo
{
    Hugo();
    explicit Hugo( const Hugo& hugo );

    Hugo GetRandomHugo()
    {
        Hugo hugo;
        hugo.value = rand();
                                  // this would fail:
                                  //    return hugo;

        return Hugo(hugo);        // explicit copy!!
    }
};

In other words: I'm looking for a explicit copy syntax, to allow methods to return a copy, even if my copy constructor is explicit.

I'm using GCC 4.4.5.

Thanks a lot,

Charly

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1  
What's wrong with the code as-is? –  Puppy Nov 26 '10 at 13:21
    
Is there some kind of error? –  elusive Nov 26 '10 at 13:22
    
Why is your copy constructor explicit? And why say, "I want my copy constructor to be explicit but I also want to perform implicit copies"? The whole point of making a constructor explicit is to prevent implicit conversion, but a copy constructor doesn't really "convert" anything, it's there to support initialization, argument passing, etc. –  Steve Jessop Nov 26 '10 at 13:41
    
@Steve: as I understand it, he doesn't want to perform/allow implicit copies, while still having an explicit syntax for enabling pass-by-value semantics. –  jalf Nov 26 '10 at 13:44
    
error: no matching function for call to ‘Hugo::Hugo(Hugo)’ –  Charly Nov 26 '10 at 13:48

3 Answers 3

You can't : a return by value is an implicit copy construction. Here, the return attempts to implicitly copy your explicitly copy-constructed temporary.

From 8.5/12 :

The initialization that occurs in argument passing, function return, throwing an exception (15.1), handling an exception (15.3), and brace-enclosed initializer lists (8.5.1) is called copy-initialization and is equivalent to the form :

T x = a;

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Wouldn't it make sense, to have such a syntax - to tell the compiler: "Yes, I want to explicit copy" –  Charly Nov 26 '10 at 13:29
1  
@Charly: we have T x(a) (direct-initialization, which is what you wrote). In a sense, the problem here is that the return statement 'hides' an additional initialization which is necessarily a copy-initialization. –  icecrime Nov 26 '10 at 13:34
    
@Charly: why would it? In any case, copies should be handled transparently since the compiler is allowed to elide them (but it still needs to find an accessible copy constructor). –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 26 '10 at 13:36
    
@Charly: why would that make sense? The entire point in having the copy constructor, and in having it be "special" is that the compiler can invoke it when needed. When it needs to copy an object, it knows how to do it. If you want an explicit syntax, just add a Copy() function. Just note that if you don't also have a copy constructor, you'll be breaking a lot of things. You won't be able to return it by value, and you won't be able to store it in containers. –  jalf Nov 26 '10 at 13:37

You can work around this by having an explicit HugoCopy class like the following

class HugoCopy;
class Hugo {
public:
    Hugo() { ... }  
    Hugo(HugoCopy const&);
    explicit Hugo(Hugo const&) { ... }
};

struct HugoCopy { 
    HugoCopy(Hugo const& hugo) 
      :hugo(hugo)
    { }

    Hugo const& hugo;
};

Hugo::Hugo(HugoCopy const&) { ... }

Now the following semantics apply

Hugo a;
Hugo b = a; // forbidden
Hugo c(a); // allowed
Hugo d = HugoCopy(a); // allowed

Hugo f() {
  Hugo a;
  return a; // forbidden
  return HugoCopy(a); // allowed
}

Alternatively, you can use a conversion function

class Hugo {
public:
    Hugo() { ... }  
    explicit Hugo(Hugo const&) { ... }
};

struct HugoCopy { 
    HugoCopy(Hugo const& hugo) 
      :hugo(hugo)
    { }
    operator Hugo const&() { return hugo; }

private:
    Hugo const& hugo;
};

This relies on a subtle corner of the C++ language. So if you use this, you better know what you're doing or you don't do it: It first calls the conversion function on HugoCopy (or in the first case, the constructor of Hugo) to get a Hugo / Hugo const&, and then it direct initializes the destination Hugo object with that Hugo object. GCC doesn't like the code, but Clang and Comeau/EDG accept it according to the above semantics.

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return Hugo(hugo); 

this just creates one additional copy before returning. The actual return statement then takes that copy and copies it again. The entire point in the copy constructor is that it can be used implicitly, whenever we or the compiler need an object copied.

If you you want an explicit syntax, you can just add a Clone() or Copy() function to the class, but it can't replace the copy constructor.

Every time the compiler needs to copy an object (for example when passing it by value as a function parameter, or when returning it from a function), it needs to create a copy of the object. There is no way that you can do it for the compiler, because you don't see the "transition" code between caller and callee. You can copy the object around inside the called function, or outside it, but you have no way of copying from the callee's body to the caller. Only the compiler can do that, and in order to do that, it needs to be able to copy the object at will -- which is done through the copy constructor.

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