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I use three different files to define a templated class. The class declaration is in a .h file, the implementation in a .cpp file and explicit instantiations are included in a .inc file. I'm trying to define a friend function that it's able to access private data members of a templated class. As in the case of templated classes, the function will be defined, implemented, and instantiated in 3 separate files. When I try the call the function, I get the following error messages:

myclass.h:error: ‘doSomething’ is neither function nor member function; cannot be declared friend

myclass.h:error: expected ‘;’ before ‘<’ token

mymethod.h: error: ‘friend’ used outside of class

Does anybody has any suggestion on how to solve this issue? I tried to simplify the code below.

myclass.h

  template<class T>
  class MyClass{

      friend T doSomething<T>( MyClass<T> *, T, int);
      friend  MyClass<T> * doSomethingElse<T>( const MyClass<T> *, const MyClass<T> *);
      public:
               ...
      private:
         T *m_pMyMatrix;
  };

mymethod.h

#include <myclass.h>
template <class T> friend T doSomething( MyClass<T> *, T, int);
template <class T> MyClass<T>* doSomethingElse(const MyClass<T>*, const MyClass<T>*);

mymethod.cpp

#include <mymethod.h>
template <class T>
T doSomething( MyClass<T> * pData, T val, int index){
   // the actual code does sth. more complex than the code below.
   pData->m_pMyMatrix[index]+=val;
   return pData->m_pMyMatrix[index];
}

template <class T>
MyClass<T>* doSomethingElse(const MyClass<T> * pData1, const MyClass<T> * pData2){
   ...
   T res1 = doSomething(pData1, val1, index1);
   ...
}
#include "mymethod-impl.inc"

mymethod-impl.inc

template float doSomething( MyClass<float> *, float, int);
template double doSomething( MyClass<double> *, double, int);

template MyClass<float>* doSomethingElse(const MyClass<float>*, const MyClass<float>*);
template MyClass<double>* doSomethingElse(const MyClass<double>*, const MyClass<double> *);
share|improve this question
    
using friend function can be dangerous ! Anyone can write a static function with the same signature and gain control of your class ,unless your friend function is declared with a namespace. – engf-010 Nov 26 '10 at 15:47
    
@Edwin: I guess this falls under the old "prevent that Murphy guy from gaining control, opposing Macchiavelli is futile anyway". – sbi Nov 26 '10 at 16:14
    
@sbi: i am just stating when you use friend functions (you dedicate a known trusted entity) ,make sure that your friend is really the one you intended. Guess whatever you want. – engf-010 Nov 26 '10 at 16:30

I think this should worK

template<class T>
class MyClass;

template <class T>
T doSomething( const MyClass<T> *, T, int);

template<class T>
class MyClass {
  friend T doSomething<T>( const MyClass<T> *, T, int);
public:
  ...
private:
  T *m_pMyMatrix;
};

That is, you need to declare the template before you can make it (or an instance thereof) a friend.

share|improve this answer
    
@Javier: try now, I have corrected the code (friend keyword should not be used in the template function declaration). – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 26 '10 at 14:08
    
@David: Thanks. I had copied the declaration without looking at it closely. – sbi Nov 26 '10 at 14:09
    
@Javier: You won't get around declaring the function template before you declare it a friend (and you will have to declare the class template in order to be able to declare the function template). However, you can define that template later. All the compiler needs for the friend is the declaration of function template (and all the compiler needs for that is the declaration of the class template). – sbi Nov 26 '10 at 14:12
    
What sould I do in the case my doSomething friend function has now a new parameter of type Foo<S>? Should I define doSomething<S,T> as friend in both class definitions (for the MyClass & Foo classes)? – Javier Jan 18 '11 at 10:45
    
@Javier: I see that Simone is already helping you with this. So far, I fully agree with everything he wrote, which would make it pointless if I repeated it. – sbi Jan 18 '11 at 12:27

I think I solved this:

mymethod.h

template<class T> class MyClass;

template<class T> 
T doSomething<T>(const MyClass<T>* pData, T val, int index);

myclass.h

#include "mymethod.h"

template<class T>
class MyClass {
    friend T doSomething<T>(const MyClass<T>* pData, T val, int index);

public:
    // ...

private:
    T *m_pMyMatrix;
};

mymethod.cpp

#include "myclass.h"

template<class T>
T doSomething(const MyClass<T>* pData, T val, int index)
{
    pData->m_pMyMatrix[index]+=val;
    return pData->m_pMyMatrix[index];
}

template<> float doSomething( const MyClass<float> *, float, int);
template<> double doSomething( const MyClass<double> *, double, int);

In practice, only thing you need is to declare the template function before MyClass definition.

share|improve this answer
    
You need to include mymethod.h in myclass.h before class definition (and remove friend declaration outside class MyClass' definition). – Simone Nov 26 '10 at 14:09
    
@Javier: You don't need to have the function definition, but only the declaration. Basically before you define MyClass you have to forward declare the MyClass template, and then declare the doSomething template function. The actual implementation can be placed anywhere. In general life is much easier if templates are provided in a single header file, but there are reasons not to do so in some cases (compilation times, fixing the types that can be used as instantiations for the template --i.e. failing to instantiate the template with some other types...) – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 26 '10 at 14:11
    
@Javies see the edit. – Simone Nov 26 '10 at 14:13
    
I don't think you can befriend an undeclared function template. – sbi Nov 26 '10 at 14:16
1  
As a side note, I would merge the two header files into a single header. The templated class and the template function are so coupled that it does not make sense to keep them separate. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 26 '10 at 14:39

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