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I have yet to find an elegant solution for this. I have a class with a method I want to track the memory usage of without modifying the function:

class Example
{
    public function hello($name)
    {
        $something = str_repeat($name, pow(1024, 2));
    }
}

$class = new Example;
$class->hello('a');

So the task is, how much memory does hello() use without interferring with it?

Note: The memory usage of this method should be 1MB. I've tried wrapping the call with memory_get_usage(); to no avail:

class Example
{
    public function hello($name)
    {
        $something = str_repeat($name, pow(1024, 2));
    }
}

$class = new Example;

$s = memory_get_usage();

$class->hello('a');

echo memory_get_usage() - $s;

This only results in 144 bytes (Not correct at all). I've tried various magic with Reflection by using the ReflectionMethod class.

I have a feeling what I need to do is calculate the difference in the method :(. If someone can think of anything cleaner then you'd really make my day.

Edit: I should mention this is in the context of a benchmarking application. So while memory_get_peak_usage works in the sense that it correctly returns the memory usage, it will also skew benchmarks ran after a high memory method. Now if there was a way to reset the memory stats, that could be good also.

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+1 and good luck finding an answer –  alex Nov 26 '10 at 14:51
    
What do you need the memory usage for? Just curious. –  Kendall Hopkins Nov 26 '10 at 16:07
    
I'm trying to fix a bug with a library called CodeBench. img833.imageshack.us/img833/3306/selection006p.png and some code: github.com/kohana/codebench/blob/3.0.x/classes/kohana/… –  The Pixel Developer Nov 26 '10 at 16:15
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use register_tick_function and just dump memeory_get_usage out every tick (line) and analysis it later. The class below could be improved by using debug_backtrace to find line number related to memory usage or adding time per line using microtime.

Profiler class

class Profiler
{

    private $_data_array = array();

    function __construct()
    {
        register_tick_function( array( $this, "tick" ) );
        declare(ticks = 1);
    }

    function __destruct()
    {
        unregister_tick_function( array( $this, "tick" ) );
    }

    function tick()
    {
        $this->_data_array[] = array(
            "memory" => memory_get_usage(),
            "time" => microtime( TRUE ),
            //if you need a backtrace you can uncomment this next line
            //"backtrace" => debug_backtrace( FALSE ),
        );
    }

    function getDataArray()
    {
        return $this->_data_array;
    }
}

Example

class Example
{
    public function hello($name)
    {
        $something = str_repeat($name, pow(1024, 2));
    }
}

$profiler = new Profiler(); //starts logging when created

$class = new Example;
$class->hello('a');

$data_array = $profiler->getDataArray();

unset( $profiler ); //stops logging when __destruct is called

print_r( $data_array );

Output

Array (
    [0] => Array (
            [memory] => 638088
            [time] => 1290788749.72
        )
    [1] => Array (
            [memory] => 638896
            [time] => 1290788749.72
        )
    [2] => Array (
            [memory] => 639536
            [time] => 1290788749.72
        )
    [3] => Array (
            [memory] => 640480
            [time] => 1290788749.72
        )
    [4] => Array (
            [memory] => 1689800 // <~ money!
            [time] => 1290788749.72
        )
    [5] => Array (
            [memory] => 641664
            [time] => 1290788749.72
        )
)

Possible Issue

Since this profiler class stores the data in PHP, the overall memory usage will increase artificially. One way to sidestep this issue would be to write the data out to a file as you go (serialized), and when your done you can read it back.

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With a bit of work, this is good. Thanks for the creative solution, don't think we'll find a better answer :-) Accepted. –  The Pixel Developer Nov 28 '10 at 3:02
    
@The Pixel Developer Thanks –  Kendall Hopkins Nov 28 '10 at 5:40
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The XHProfLive profiler developed by the Facebook guys gives this degree of function/method-level profiling, and available as a PECL download.

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It looks like it has already 'freed up' memory after the call to hello() has ended.

What are the results when you do:

$s = memory_get_usage();

$class->hello('a');

echo memory_get_peak_usage() - $s;
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I've added a comment regarding memory_get_peak_usage(), thanks. –  The Pixel Developer Nov 26 '10 at 14:56
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You should use a php memory tool.

There is a nice one to be found in this SO thread: Tools to visually analyze memory usage of a PHP app.

this other question holds some further answers regarding your question

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The memory is released when you are returning from the function.

You might add the $s = memory_get_usage(); ... echo memory_get_usage() - $s; block inside of the function. This way, the memory used will not be released.

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The only trustable method I know to achieve this is profiling with tools that are not written in php itself.

Read this:

http://www.xdebug.org/docs/profiler

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