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df.sorted <- c("binned_walker1_1.grd", "binned_walker1_2.grd", "binned_walker1_3.grd",
    "binned_walker1_4.grd", "binned_walker1_5.grd", "binned_walker1_6.grd",
    "binned_walker2_1.grd", "binned_walker2_2.grd", "binned_walker3_1.grd",
    "binned_walker3_2.grd", "binned_walker3_3.grd", "binned_walker3_4.grd",
    "binned_walker3_5.grd", "binned_walker4_1.grd", "binned_walker4_2.grd",
    "binned_walker4_3.grd", "binned_walker4_4.grd", "binned_walker4_5.grd",
    "binned_walker5_1.grd", "binned_walker5_2.grd", "binned_walker5_3.grd",
    "binned_walker5_4.grd", "binned_walker5_5.grd", "binned_walker5_6.grd",
    "binned_walker6_1.grd", "binned_walker7_1.grd", "binned_walker7_2.grd",
    "binned_walker7_3.grd", "binned_walker7_4.grd", "binned_walker7_5.grd",
    "binned_walker8_1.grd", "binned_walker8_2.grd", "binned_walker9_1.grd",
    "binned_walker9_2.grd", "binned_walker9_3.grd", "binned_walker9_4.grd",
    "binned_walker10_1.grd", "binned_walker10_2.grd", "binned_walker10_3.grd")

One would expect that order of this vector would be 1:length(df.sorted), but that appears not to be the case. It looks like R internally sorts the vector according to its logic but tries really hard to display it the way it was created (and is seen in the output).

order(df.sorted)
 [1] 37 38 39  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
[26] 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

Is there a way to "reset" the ordering to 1:length(df.sorted)? That way, ordering and the output of the vector would be in sync.

share|improve this question
up vote 12 down vote accepted

construct it as an ordered factor:

> df.new <- ordered(df.sorted,levels=df.sorted)
> order(df.new)
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 ...

EDIT :

After @DWins comment, I want to add that it is even not nessecary to make it an ordered factor, just a factor is enough if you give the right order of levels :

>     df.new2 <- factor(df.sorted,levels=df.sorted)
>     order(df.new)
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 ...

The difference will be noticeable when you use those factors in a regression analysis, they can be treated differently. The advantage of ordered factors is that they let you use comparison operators as < and >. This makes life sometimes a lot easier.

> df.new2[5] < df.new2[10]
[1] NA
Warning message:
In Ops.factor(df.new[5], df.new[10]) : < not meaningful for factors

> df.new[5] < df.new[10]
[1] TRUE
share|improve this answer

Use the mixedsort (or) mixedorder functions in package gtools:

require(gtools)
mixedorder(df.sorted)
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
[28] 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39
share|improve this answer
    
+1 : nice tool, didn't know it yet. – Joris Meys Nov 26 '10 at 15:48
    
+1: wasn't aware of that function, DWin. – Gavin Simpson Nov 26 '10 at 16:23
    
Actually, my df.sorted is the result of gtools::mixedsort. :) – Roman Luštrik Nov 26 '10 at 23:02
    
@Roman: indeed, but the thing is that order will still give you the order according to the normal sort. mixedsort is the mixed equivalent for sort, mixedorder the mixed equivalent for order. Mixedsort doesn't save the order in the object, for that you have to make it an ordered factor. – Joris Meys Nov 26 '10 at 23:38
1  
@Dwin : true, I'll update my answer. Keep in mind though that a normal factor does not allow you to test order using the < and > operators. – Joris Meys Dec 6 '10 at 14:53

Isn't this simply the same thing you get with all lexicographic shorts (as e.g. ls on directories) where walker10_foo sorts higher than walker1_foo?

The easiest way around, in my book, is to use a consistent number of digits, i.e. I would change to binned_walker01_1.grd and so on inserting a 0 for the one-digit counts.

share|improve this answer
1  
Sometimes the data "comes at you" rather than being "putty in your hands" from the very beginning. That's why I would never dismiss the value of Greg Warnes mixedsort(). – 42- Nov 26 '10 at 15:46

In response to Dwin's comment on Dirk's answer: the data are always putty in your hands. "This is R. There is no if. Only how." -- Simon Blomberg

You can add 0 like so:

df.sorted <- gsub("(walker)([[:digit:]]{1}_)", "\\10\\2", df.sorted)

If you needed to add 00, you do it like this:

df.sorted <- gsub("(walker)([[:digit:]]{1}_)", "\\10\\2", df.sorted)
df.sorted <- gsub("(walker)([[:digit:]]{2}_)", "\\10\\2", df.sorted)

...and so on.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, it' all about the how. I'm just an apprentice. Perhaps some day I can make my own light saber. Until then I will use other's. – 42- Nov 27 '10 at 0:57
1  
@DWin But how will you learn to make your own if you only use others'? ;-) – Joshua Ulrich Nov 27 '10 at 13:11

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